Navigation Links
How Ion Channels are Organized to Control Nerve Cell Communication?

The messages passed in a neuronal network can target something like 100 billion nerve cells in the brain alone. //These, in turn communicate with millions of other cells and organs in the body. How, then, do whole cascades of events trigger responses that are highly specific, quick and precisely timed?

A team at the Weizmann Institute of Science has now shed light on this mysterious mechanism. Their discovery could have important implications for the future development of drugs for epilepsy and other nervous system diseases. These findings were recently published in the journal Neuron.

The secret is in the control over electrical signals generated by cells. These signals depend on ion channels – membrane proteins found in excitable cells, such as nerve cells – that allow them to generate electrical signals, depending on whether the channels are opened or closed.

Prof. Eitan Reuveny, together with Ph.D. students Inbal Riven and Shachar Iwanir of the Weizmann Institute’s Biological Chemistry Department, studied channels that work on potassium ions and are coupled to a protein called the G protein, which when activated, causes the channel to open. Opening the channel inhibits the conductance of electrical signals, a fact that might be relevant, for example, in the control of seizures.

The G protein itself is activated by another protein, a receptor, which gets its cue to carry out its task from chemical messengers known as neurotransmitters. But neurotransmitters are general messengers – they can inhibit as well as excite, and the receptors can respond to either message. How, the scientists wanted to know, is the G protein targeted so quickly and precisely to activate the channel?

Reuveny and his team found that the receptor and G protein are physically bound together in a complex, allowing the process to be finely tuned. When the receptor receives a chemical message from the neurotransmitter, it is alread y hooked up to the correct G protein. After being activated by the receptor, the G protein changes shape, opening the ion channel.

The evidence for this complex structure came from special technique called FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) that can measure the distance between two molecules. The scientists observed that even without stimulation, there is a lot of energy transfer between the G protein and the potassium channel, suggesting that they are very close together.

Mutations in ion channels are likely to be involved in epilepsy, chronic pain, neurodegenerative diseases and muscular diseases, and ion channels are the target of many drugs. Understanding the basic biological phenomena behind the way proteins organize themselves and orchestrate biological processes may allow scientists to design better or more efficient drugs.



Source-Eurekalert
RI
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. New Way to Open Cellular Ion Channels, Implications for Drug Design
2. Brain Networks Strengthened by Closing Ion Channels
3. FDA Approves Birth Control Skin Patch
4. Control of inflammation
5. New Birth Control Pills increase the stroke risk
6. Control of anger disorder connected to Brain Dysfunction
7. WHO Declares Vietnam First Country to Control SARS
8. The Importance Of “ Good ”Control Of Diabetes During Pregnanc
9. Controlling Asthma during Pregnancy
10. Effective Control Of Blood Sugar Levels
11. Controlling Allergies Before They Start
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... First Choice Emergency Room , the largest network of independent freestanding ... of its new Mesquite-Samuell Farm facility. , “We are pleased to announce Dr. ... James M. Muzzarelli, Executive Medical Director of First Choice Emergency Room. , Dr. ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... recover from injury. Recently, he has implemented orthobiologic procedures as a method for ... is one of the first doctors to perform the treatment. Orthobiologics are substances ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... Conventional wisdom preaches the benefits of moderation, whether it’s a matter of indulgence ... high can result in disappointment, perhaps even self-loathing. However, those who set the bar ... from PsychTests.com reveals that behind the tendency to set low expectations is ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... Those who have experienced traumatic events may suffer from a complex set of ... or alcohol abuse, as a coping mechanism. To avoid this pain and suffering, Serenity ... event. , Trauma sufferers tend to feel a range of emotions, from depression, guilt, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... in a crisis. Her son James, eight, was out of control. Prone to extreme mood ... something upset him, he couldn’t control his emotions,” remembers Marcy. “If there was a ... children and say he was going to kill them. If we were driving on ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... 24, 2016  Global Blood Therapeutics, Inc. (GBT) (NASDAQ: ... novel therapeutics for the treatment of grievous blood-based ... closing of its previously announced underwritten public offering ... public offering price of $18.75 per share. All ... by GBT. GBT estimates net proceeds from the ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016 ... has announced the addition of the " Global ... This report ... provides an updated review, including its applications in various ... total market, which includes three main industries: pharmaceutical and ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... 24, 2016 The Academy of Managed Care ... that would allow biopharmaceutical companies to more easily ... make formulary and coverage decisions, a move that addresses ... medicines. The recommendations address restrictions in the ... the drug label, a prohibition that hinders decision makers ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: