Navigation Links
High Level ICU Facilities Afford Greater Survival Chances for Small Infants

A recent survey that appears in the May 24th issue of the New England Journal of Medicine states that, very low birth weight infants delivered in hospitals with high-level neonatal intensive care units, have better survival chances. These hospitals care for more than 100 babies annually as compared to facilities that care for less than 100 babies per year.

The research was supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the National Institutes of Health (agencies within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are specialized hospital facilities offering medical care for newborn infants. NICUs are classified according to the level of services they provide. High-level neonatal intensive care units provide mechanical ventilationthe use of a device that assists with breathing. Depending on the level of care, some high-level NICUs provide major surgery.

Very low birth weight infants are those weighing less than 1500 grams, or about 3.3 pounds, at birth. Very low birth weight infants are highly vulnerable to medical complications. In 2000, these infants comprised just 1.4 percent of U.S. births but 51 percent of infant deaths. The latest research indicates some of these newborn deaths may be preventable.

Based on their analyses of California birth records, the researchers reported that less than a quarter of very low birth weight infants are born in hospitals with high-level, high-volume NICUs, and this percentage has been declining over time. The study examined differences in death rates across hospitals with different NICU levels and their volume (how many very low birth weight infants they care for in a year).

The researchers found that hospitals with lower-volume, lower-level NICUs had a significantly higher newborn death rate for very low birth weight infants when compa red with the newborn death rate among this group in hospitals with high-level and high-volume NICUs.

"Previous studies have established a link between high volume and high quality among NICUs, and this study offers further evidence of that relationship," said Carolyn M. Clancy, M.D., AHRQs Director. "It is becoming increasingly clear that some very low birth weight infants are not getting the care they need, and that we need to make sure that patients and clinicians know how important high-quality NICU care is."

The researchers were led by Ciaran Phibbs, Ph.D., Health Economist at the Health Economics Resource Center at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System and Associate Professor at the Department of Pediatrics at Stanford University.

The researchers analyzed data from more than 48,000 very low birth weight infants born in California hospitals from 1991 to 2000. They calculated newborn death rates by linking birth certificates, hospital discharge abstracts, and fetal and infant death certificates.

Despite the increased survival rate for very low birth weight infants in large, high-level NICUs, the researchers found that an increasing number of high-risk newborns are receiving care in low-volume, mid-level units.

In the past 20 years, a growing number of community hospitals have built NICUs, but most have been lower level facilities that see only a few very low birth weight infants.

"While lower-level NICUs are required to have formal relationships with high-level NICUs, the mere fact that they have such a relationship is no guarantee that the lower-level NICUs are going to get the same level of results as can be obtained at the large high volume NICUs," Dr. Phibbs said.

Dr. Phibbs and his colleagues determined that as much as 21 percent of very low birth weight infant deaths in California could have been avoided.

"The increasing number of NICU s in community hospitals does not serve all very low birth weight infants in all instances," said Dr. Phibbs. "These results indicate that increased regionalizationthat is, ensuring that more very low birth weight infants are born at higher level NICUsmight reduce infant mortality."


'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Virus Level could Predict Cervical Cancer Risk
2. Levels Of Blood Proteins May Help Heart Disease Care
3. Elevated Ozone Levels Hurt Sperm Count
4. Elevating Manganese Levels hold back HIV
5. High Levels of Protein Linked to Brain Shrinkage
6. Fitness Level Predicts Stroke
7. Chickens Found To Have High Levels of Arsenic
8. Low Protein Levels A Possible Indicator For A Miscarriage
9. Low Testosterone Levels the Cause Of Depression In Men
10. Weather Found To Play An Important Role In Cholesterol Levels
11. Education Levels Found To Predict Stress
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/28/2017)... NC (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2017 , ... ... announce its new partnership with the Home Care Association of America (HCAOA). This ... and Private Duty Accreditation services, as well as discounts on Accreditation University (AU) ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield ... credit rating of “A” and its outlook as “stable.” At the same time, the ... have fallen in recent years, dip below “capital adequacy” thresholds required for its strong ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... California (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2017 , ... ... T8 Direct Replace tubes . These lamps offer an instant energy-saving solution for ... need to rewire fixtures or disconnect ballasts. These 50,000 hour rated lamps utilize ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... ... The Texas Cord Blood Bank (TCBB), a program of nonprofit biomedical organization ... Hospital at Renaissance in Edinburg for their outstanding efforts in collecting umbilical cord blood ... , “Women’s Hospital at Renaissance has been a collection partner for the TCBB ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... San Diego, Ca (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2017 , ... ... the property management industry in the coastal communities. After Tina Howe joined the team, ... healthy and happy employees, honest services at affordable rates, and giving back to the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)... -- Vivify Health, the pioneer and market leader of remote ... significant patent for the advancement of healthcare delivery from ... health.  This landmark patent provides the company with broad ... position as the leader in remote care.  ... to apply consumer mobile devices, wireless biometrics, EMR integration ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... 20, 2017 Research and Markets has announced ... Driven by Rapidly Expanding Injectables Market and Increasing Usage of Complex ... ... technologies will rise from USD 20 Billion in 2015 to around ... Delivery Technologies - Innovation Driven by Rapidly Expanding Injectables Market and ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... April 20, 2017 Research and Markets ... Size, Market Share, Application Analysis, Regional Outlook, Growth Trends, Key ... to their offering. ... global pharmacogenomics market was valued at US$ 7,167.6 Mn in ... 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 5.6% from 2016 to ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: