Navigation Links
Golf Courses Could Serve as Wildlife Sanctuaries If Managed Properly

Golf courses, if properly managed, could serve as important wildlife sanctuaries, a recent study by a University of Missouri-Columbia researcher has revealed .

"There are more than 17,000 golf courses in the United States, and approximately 70 percent of that land is not used for playing. These managed green spaces aren't surrogates for protected land and ecosystems, but they can include suitable habitat for species native to the area. Golf courses could act as nature sanctuaries if managed properly," said Ray Semlitsch, Curators' Professor of Biology in the MU College of Arts and Science.

Semlitsch, along with Michelle Boone, an assistant professor at Miami University in Ohio and former MU graduate student, and J. Russell Bodie, senior scientist for Audubon International, outlined recommendations that would improve golf course habitats for amphibian populations in a paper published in USGA Turfgrass and Environmental Research Online in January.

Their recommendations included buffering aquatic habitats from chemical runoff, surrounding wetland areas with 150 to 300 meters of forest or natural grassland, and creating a diversity of pond types that mimic natural wetlands.

A recent study by Semlitsch, Boone and Cory Mosby, a senior at MU, built on these suggestions, and found that completely drying golf course ponds in the late summer or early fall would benefit amphibian populations and biodiversity.

"It's a hard concept for people to understand, but non-permanent wetlands are more natural than permanent wetlands. Most natural wetlands dry for some periods of time, and the species that live in them are well-adapted for this. The natural drying process benefits amphibians, and it releases nutrients from the soil. Maintaining permanent ponds actually harms biodiversity," said Prof. Semlitsch.

In the study, the researchers used two types of ponds - control reference ponds and ponds l ocated on golf courses - to monitor populations of American toads, southern leopard frogs and spotted salamanders.

They found that the American toads, southern leopard frogs and spotted salamanders survived better in the golf course ponds than in the control ponds, probably because of a reduced number of insect predators.

They also found that these species survived better in the absence of over-wintered bullfrog tadpoles, which are common to permanent golf course ponds and act as unnatural predators and competitors.

Semlitsch said this showed that greater biodiversity could be achieved by eliminating bullfrog tadpoles.

"As bullfrog cycles of metamorphosis take longer to complete (typically 12 months) than the cycles of other amphibians (typically one to four months), the bullfrog tadpoles have advantages in permanent ponds and can grow larger and more powerful, nudging out other species. By drying golf course ponds in the early fall, the tadpoles can be eliminated," he said.

The study is scheduled for publication later this year in the journal Conservation Biology.


'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Provisional Fees For Medical Courses Fixed By Punjab Government
2. Supreme Court Quashed Reservation Quotas For PG Medical Courses
3. Amity Institutions To Launch Short-term Professional Courses In Oman
4. Evidence Underlying Repeated Courses of Steroids for Preterm Birth may Be Unsound
5. Lean Protein Could Be Key to Obesity Drugs
6. Nasal Spray Could Take Drugs Direct to Brain.
7. Nasal Spray Could Take Drugs Directly to Brain
8. Oxygen Usage During Exercise Could Indicate Heart Problems
9. Ultrasound Screening Could Improve The Outcome Of Critically ill Patients
10. Anger Could Be Linked To Weight Gain
11. A Seizure Late In Life Could be A Stroke Warning
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/27/2017)... , ... June 27, 2017 , ... Harbour , ... token assets on the Ethereum blockchain, has released their technical specifications . , ... there has been little systematic approach for determining which offerings will garner the greatest ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... Meadows, IL (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2017 ... ... Society for Dermatologic Surgery Association’s SUNucate efforts, Louisiana became the sixth state ... at school. With Governor John Bel Edwards’ signature, Louisiana joins the states ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... ... ... Two residents from the Gardant-managed assisted living and memory care communities in South ... protect Medicaid funding. , The video, which was produced by the American Health Care ... Cathy Schwarz, a couple who is still able to see each other every day ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... ... 27, 2017 , ... Atmosera , a premier Microsoft ... Services . The trusted, transparent, and secure solution for the cloud enablement of ... Atmosera’s next generation services include integrated capabilities for public, private, and hybrid Azure ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... Rosemont, Ill. (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2017 , ... ... & Conditioning Association (NBSCA) have named Javair Gillett of the Houston Rockets the NBSCA ... recipient of the award is decided by NBSCA members who vote to select the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/30/2017)... , May 30, 2017 Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. ... Annual Global Healthcare Conference on Tuesday, June 13, 2017, ... John Greisch , Hill-Rom,s president and chief executive officer, is ... The live audio webcast can be accessed at http://ir.hill-rom.com/events.cfm ... conclusion of the live event through September 13, 2017. ...
(Date:5/29/2017)... Biotechnology Ltd. (NASDAQ: APOP ; TASE: APOP), a ... of stem cells, today provided a corporate update and ... 31 st , 2017. "We are ... of 2017," said Dr. Shai Yarkoni, Chief Executive Officer. ... the first blood cancer patient in the recently initiated ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... , May 25, 2017  In response to the ... , Direct Relief is working with Pfizer to make ... at no cost to community health centers, free and ... nationwide. "Pfizer has a long-standing commitment ... and ensuring patient safety through educational activities," said ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: