Navigation Links
Genetically Modified Cells Attack Tumors

Mice with neuroblastoma tumors have been successfully treated with genetically modified cells that sought out the cancer cells and activated a chemotherapy drug directly at// those sites, according to investigators at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and their colleagues at City of Hope National Medical Center (Duarte, Calif.) and the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada). Neuroblastoma is a solid tumor that arises in the part of the nervous system outside the brain.

The researchers also showed that the modified cells migrated to tumors regardless of how small the tumors were or where they were located in the body. A report on this work appears in the Dec. 20 issue of the Web-based journal PLoS ONE.

The study is the first to provide evidence that such cells, called neural stem-progenitor cells (NSPCs), can be used to target solid tumors that have metastasized (spread from their original site), according to the researchers. During normal development NSPCs give rise to all the various types of cells in the brain.

Moreover, since the drug, called CPT-11 (irinotecan), is already used to treat cancers, doctors and scientists already know how the drug behaves in humans. That knowledge should make it easier to translate these laboratory findings to the clinic, the researchers said.

The ability to target tumors with CPT-11 suggests that this technique could let clinicians treat tumors in humans more effectively while avoiding side effects caused by damage to normal cells. The success with neuroblastoma also suggests this technique might improve the treatment of other solid tumors that metastasize, such as colon and prostate cancer.

This homing ability is especially important in the case of high-risk neuroblastoma because even very small tumors that survive after an initially successful treatment often generate more cancer cells that spread and become unresponsive to treatment, said Mary Danks, Ph.D., associate member of Molecular Pharmacology at St. Jude. Therefore, the study holds special promise for children with high-risk neuroblastoma because as many as 80 percent of these patients relapse with chemotherapy-resistant metastatic cancer. Neuroblastoma is considered high risk if the tumors have certain genetic mutations or have already spread when the cancer is diagnosed.

“Clinicians are limited in how aggressively they can treat these children because the chemotherapy drugs produce harsh side effects and therefore must be administered at reduced levels,” Danks said. “But by targeting tumor cells while avoiding normal cells, doctors could treat the neuroblastoma aggressively while minimizing side effects.” Danks is senior author of the PLoS ONE report.

The researchers based their new treatment on work previously reported that showed certain NSPCs have a natural tendency to seek out damaged or cancerous areas in the brain.

In the current study, the researchers first injected into mice that had neuroblastoma large numbers of NSPCs that had been genetically modified to carry a drug-activating enzyme called rabbit carboxylesterase (rCE). The NSPCs traveled to the tumors and used the gene to produce rCE. Three days later the team injected the CPT-11 into the mice. The drug dispersed throughout the mice but was activated by rCE selectively at the neuroblastoma tumors. The researchers used the rabbit form of this enzyme because it activates CPT-11 much more efficiently than the human version, Danks said. This activation is essential to treatment because the activated form is up to 1,000 times more active than CPT-11.

While half of a group of 10 mice that received only CPT-11 survived for six months, all 10 mice treated with both the modified NSPCs and CPT-11 survived for more than six months.

“There is a real need for new treatments for neuroblastoma that target tumor cells while having minimal si de effects,” said Karen S. Aboody, M.D., assistant professor in the Division of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation at City of Hope. “The use of NSPCs carrying the gene for rCE might fill that need.” Aboody is first author of the PLoS ONE report.

Source-NewswiseBR>SRM
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Malaria To Be Tackled By Genetically Modified Mosquitoes
2. Genetically modified rice faces strong protests in Asia
3. Genetically modified bacteria to combat HIV
4. Asthma And Obesity Are Genetically Linked
5. Women Are Genetically More Prone To Depression
6. Genetically modified Lactic acid bacteria offers HIV protection
7. Regulators Object Drug Produced from Genetically Engineered Farm Animals
8. Cocaine Acts As Suppressant Not Stimulant In Genetically Altered Mice
9. Multiple Sclerosis in Genetically Susceptible Twins is Augmented by Northern Environment
10. Humans Genetically More Suited To Being Vegetarians Than Meat-eaters
11. Indian American have Genetically Engineered Edible Cottonseed
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:10/12/2017)... WILMINGTON, Del. (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 ... ... technology and advisory services for healthcare compliance program management, will showcase a range ... and National Association for Assisted Living (NCAL) Convention and Expo to be held ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... IsoComforter, Inc. ... products, announced today the introduction of an innovative new design of the shoulder pad. ... so you get maximum comfort while controlling your pain while using cold therapy. By ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Dr. Parsa Mohebi, the Los Angeles based ... the newly revamped Cosmetic Town journal section, featuring articles written by ... as Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE). , Dr. Mohebi says “I enjoy ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Women-owned and ... 2017 Best and Brightest in Wellness® by Best and Brightest. OnSite Wellness will ... Friday, Oct. 20 from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Henry Autograph ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... at the University of California Berkeley, and other leading institutions in announcing the ... power of institutions to change the way animals are raised for food. , ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2017)... , Oct. 10, 2017   West Pharmaceutical ... innovative solutions for injectable drug administration, today shared the ... ID Adapter for improving the intradermal administration of polio ... Skin Vaccination Summit in May 2017 by Dr. ... Polio Department, World Health Organization (WHO), and recently published ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), influenza vaccination should take ... communities across Massachusetts , Connecticut , ... through the end of the month. *Some exclusions apply ... ... by the end of October, according to the Centers for Disease Control ...
(Date:10/2/2017)...  AllianceRx Walgreens Prime, the combined central specialty pharmacy ... benefit manager Prime Therapeutics LLC (Prime), today officially began ... unveiling of new signage at its headquarters in ... a few other company-owned facilities across the country. This ... of whom will begin to see the AllianceRx Walgreens ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: