Navigation Links
Fishing for a Speedy Recovery After Chemotherapy or Marrow Transplant

Researchers at Childrens Hospital, Boston, have discovered a novel way of increasing stem cells in blood, that holds promise for patients undergoing chemotherapy and bone marrow transplant.

The recent research on zebra fish has raised hope about its ability to help patients bounce back sooner after treatment for cancer or recuperating post bone marrow transplant. The research is available in detail in the current issue of Nature.

The discovery, made possible through high-volume drug screening in zebra fish, marks the first time stem-cell production has been induced by a small-molecule drug, says the studys senior author, Leonard Zon, MD, of the Childrens Hospital Boston Stem Cell Program and Division of Hematology/Oncology. Other studies, including one from Zon's own lab*, have identified ways of increasing formation of blood stem cells, which give rise to each of the bodys various blood cell types. However, the methods are technically complex and havent lent themselves to broad medical use.

The hospital now hopes to conduct a clinical trial of the drug, a long-active derivative of prostaglandin E2 known as dmPGE2. This compound was originally tested more than 20 years ago for patients with gastritis, but was never marketed as a drug.

Currently, patients undergoing bone marrow transplant must wait for marrow from a matched donor to replenish their stem cells and reproduce the full array of blood cell types, including all the cells of the immune system. When theres no suitable donor for a marrow match, patients can receive umbilical cord blood, which also contains blood stem cells. But the number of stem cells in one cord of blood is often not adequate for older children and adults, leaving them with diminished immune function and high risk for infections.

Zon and colleagues Trista North, PhD, and Wolfram Goessling, MD, PhD, both also of Childrens Stem Cell Program, zeroed in on dmPGE2 by screen ing more than 2,500 chemicals in zebrafish. Knowing that two genes, runx1 and cmyb, are required for blood stem cells to develop in vertebrate embryos, they looked for compounds that altered the expression (activation) of these genes. North spent six months placing 15,000+ tiny embryos in wells, each containing a different chemical five embryos to a well, 48 wells to a plate then checking each embryo 24 hours later to monitor its development and count its blood stem cells.

The screen identified 82 chemicals that markedly increased or decreased gene activity. Of these, 10 turned out to affect the prostaglandin pathway: five increased the formation of blood stem cells, and five decreased it. We werent specifically looking for prostaglandins, says Zon, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator who is also a member of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. This was a surprise finding.

A variety of experiments confirmed that prostaglandins, particularly dmPGE2, promote blood stem cell formation, while chemicals that block prostaglandin synthesis (such as aspirin or ibuprofen), suppress blood stem cell formation. Finally, in zebrafish whose marrow was depleted by irradiation, those given dmPGE2 recovered blood cell populations more quickly.

Prostaglandins are known to be released by the body when inflammation is present such as after an injury and may be among the compounds that aid recovery. So it makes some sense that prostaglandins would have the ability to enhance regrowth of cells, Zon says.

The zebrafish is ideal for investigating blood formation, says North. It reproduces quickly and in large number and has a blood-forming system that shares many similarities with that of mammals. Zebrafish embryos develop outside the mothers body and can take up chemicals through their skin, making it easy to test the developmental effects of large numbers of compounds very rapidly, while their transparent skin makes it p ossible to visualize the blood stem cells in live fish.

The researchers also confirmed their observations in mammalian models. When dmPGE2 was added to mouse embryonic stem cells in the lab, production of blood stem cells increased. In mice that underwent bone marrow transplant, treatment with dmPGE2 led to enhanced blood-stem-cell formation, and the stem cells remained present in the marrow more than six months after transplantation, indicating long-term engraftment. The fact that we confirmed the zebrafish discovery in a mammalian system suggests it may also be applicable in humans, says Goessling.

The clinical trial, projected to begin in 2008 at Childrens Hospital Boston in conjunction with the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, will recruit patients undergoing cord blood transplant for leukemia.

Patients will receive cord blood to replenish their blood systems, some of it treated with dmPGE2 to enhance blood-stem-cell formation. Having more stem cells should help the blood system to regrow faster and minimize complications, such as infections, says North.


'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Just Had Bowel Surgery? Chew Gum For A Speedy Recovery
2. Proper Diagnosis Could Augment Speedy Recovery Of Haglund’s Syndrom
3. Glucose Enables Speedy Recovery From Malaria
4. Amphetamines Help Recovery of Stroke Patients
5. Recovery from lung injury
6. Recovery After Heart Transplantation
7. Combination Therapy Found To Improves Stroke Recovery
8. Swallowing Exercises Helps With Cancer Treatment Recovery
9. Early Detection Of Prostate Cancer For Complete Recovery From Prostate Cancer
10. Breast Cancer Survivors Emotional Recovery Is Rapid After Treatment
11. Face Transplant Patient Jeopardizing Chances of Recovery By Smoking
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/26/2016)... ... , ... PawPaws brand pet supplements owned by Whole Health Supply ... health of felines. The formula is all-natural and is made from Chinese herbs that ... Cat Kidney Support Supplement Soft Chews are Astragalus Root Extract and Rehmannia Root ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Austin residents seeking Mohs surgery services, can ... Surgery and to Dr. Russell Peckham for medical and surgical dermatology. , Dr. Dorsey ... cancer. The selective fellowship in Mohs Micrographic Surgery completed by Dr. Dorsey was under ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a ... Magna Cum Laude and his M.D from the David Geffen School of Medicine at ... returned to Los Angeles to complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... A ... procedures that most people are unfamiliar with. The article goes on to state that ... but also many of these less common operations such as calf and cheek reduction. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... Conference and Scientific Sessions in Dallas that it will receive two significant new ... the grants came as PHA marked its 25th anniversary by recognizing patients, medical ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... 2016 According to a new ... Pen Needles, Safety Pen Needles), Needle Length (4mm, 5mm, ... Mode of Purchase (Retail, Non-Retail) - Trends & Global ... the market for the forecast period of 2016 to ... Billion by 2021 from USD 1.65 Billion in 2016, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , Belgium , June ... MKT: VNRX), today announced the appointment of Dr. ... of Directors as a Non-Executive Director, effective June ... Company,s Audit, Compensation and Nominations and Governance Committees.  ... Dr. Futcher will provide independent expertise and strategic ...
(Date:6/23/2016)...  MedSource announced today that it has selected ... of choice.  This latest decision demonstrates MedSource,s commitment ... clients by offering a state-of-the-art electronic data capture ... as the EDC platform of choice in exchange ... has long been a preferred EDC platform by ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: