Navigation Links
Fat Metabolism Of Heart Muscles Affected By High Blood Pressure

A research conducted by de las Fuentes and colleagues at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that hearts with muscle thickening// or hypertrophy due to high blood pressure get less energy because of their reduced fat metabolism. Their finding has been published in the recent issue of the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology.

"The heart is the single most energy-consuming organ per weight in the body," says Lisa de las Fuentes, M.D.

Earlier research led by de las Fuentes' colleague Robert J. Gropler, M.D., showed that heart muscle in people with diabetes is overly dependent on fat for energy. Even though fat is an efficient fuel, burning it for energy creates an unusually high demand for oxygen, making the diabetic heart more sensitive to the drops in oxygen levels that occur with coronary artery blockage.

Gropler is director of the Cardiovascular Imaging Laboratory at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at the School of Medicine and professor of radiology, medicine and biomedical engineering.

Now this group of Washington University researchers has shown that hearts of non-diabetics with muscle thickening due to high blood pressure have an energy metabolism skewed in the opposite direction -- away from the use of fat for energy.

"Whereas Dr. Gropler found that a high level of fatty acid metabolism could be detrimental, we show that a low level may also be harmful," says de las Fuentes, co-director of the Cardiovascular Imaging and Clinical Research Core Laboratory and assistant professor of medicine. "These findings aren't contradictory. The heart has to be able to choose the energy source, either fats or glucose, most appropriate for its current energy needs and the availability of fuel."

De las Fuentes explains that hearts with muscle thickening, or hypertrophy, get less energy because of their reduced fat metabolism, which leads them to rely more heavily on carbohydrates.< br>
"Carbohydrates produce less energy per molecule than fatty acids," she says. "With hypertrophy, the heart has a higher energy demand because there's more muscle to feed. With less fat metabolism, a greater reliance on carbohydrates may represent a shift to a less-efficient fuel."

The metabolic abnormality can eventually lead to impaired contraction of the heart and to heart failure.

Animal studies by collaborators at Washington University have shown that in mice with thickened heart muscle, genes associated with transporting and breaking down fatty acids are less active than normal -- in other words, the heart's fat-burning machinery is malfunctioning.

In this human study, the researchers studied patients who had high blood pressure that resulted in hypertrophy of the muscle of the left ventricle, the chamber of the heart that pumps blood to the body. The study showed that the greater the muscle mass of the hypertrophic heart, the lower the ability to burn fat. Magnetic resonance scans suggested that hypertrophic heart muscle had subtle abnormalities in contractile function at rest and was less energy efficient.

Normally heart muscle will alter between using fats and carbohydrates as fuel depending on availability. But at times of the day when blood glucose is low -- such as when a person hasn't eaten in a while -- hypertrophic hearts can't switch to burning fatty acids as normal hearts would, possibly leaving them energy deficient, de las Fuentes explains.

"This is the first time these data have been shown in humans," says senior author Victor G. Dávila-Román, M.D., director of the Cardiovascular Imaging and Clinical Research Core Laboratory and professor of medicine, anesthesiology and radiology. "That is particularly significant because hypertension (high blood pressure) is a huge public health problem in the United States. Of the 65 million people with hypertension, between 25 and 50 percent of t hem have some evidence that their heart has been affected by high blood pressure."

Not everyone who has high blood pressure will develop hypertrophy, and not everyone with hypertrophy has long-term problems, according to de las Fuentes. Some people appear to be protected while others appear to be at increased risk, likely due to genetic factors.

"Because we have this evidence that shows that fatty acid metabolism may play a role in this process, we are looking for variations in the metabolism genes in an ongoing clinical study," de las Fuentes says.

Dávila-Román adds that by looking at the genetics of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease, they hope to identify genes that predispose people to both good and bad traits associated with these disorders. Such information promises opportunities for both prevention and treatment of cardiac disease.

Source: Eurekalet
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Understanding The Link Between Movement And Metabolism
2. Metabolism cycle of Kala-Azar parasite revealed
3. Adult and Children Have Varied Drug Metabolism
4. Abnormal Glucose Metabolism May Contribute to Chronic Nerve Disorder
5. A New Gene to Contribute in Insulin Metabolism
6. Glucose Sensor That Controls Glucose Metabolism Identified
7. Primitive Yeast Yields Secrets Of Human Cholesterol And Drug Metabolism
8. One in Three Heart Attack Patients Have No Chest Pains
9. Epileptic Seizures Can Be Due to Heart Problem
10. Bypass Heart Surgery Performed Without General Anesthesia
11. New CPR Guidelines issued by Heart Association
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Every winter, someone is killed, injured or ... West Penn Burn Center, part of the Allegheny Health Network, has partnered with ... the “Space Heaters Need Space” campaign. , “Space Heaters Need Space” aims ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... , ... The Jones Agency, a family owned insurance company with offices serving ... charity drive with the Tarrant Area Food Bank in the hopes of alleviating hunger ... need, the Tarrant County Food Bank offers hope and security to the one in ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Young ... area, celebrates the beginning of the latest charity campaign in their community enrichment ... art. Donations to this worthy cause are currently being accepted at: http://artexpressioninc.org/ ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... ... For Coast Dental dentist Everet Lake, DDS, the smiles began at dawn. ... before 7 a.m. to volunteer at Friday’s Dentistry from the Heart event in New ... help hundreds of uninsured and underinsured people receive much-needed dental care. , This ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... ... foods choices that promote eye health. These articles generally list between five and ... health advocate Sharon Kleyne endorses every one of these lists and believes that ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/12/2016)... February 12, 2016 ... titled Chronic Inflammation Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, ... the global clinical trials landscape along with top ... Region, Country (G7 & E7), Trial Status, Trial ... reviews top companies involved and enlists all trials ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... 2016 Laboratory glassware and plasticware ... These may range from microscope slides to large storage ... from borosilicate glass because of its low weight and ... hand, started gaining popularity over the past decade when ... glass with plastic in several applications due to its ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... 11, 2016 Potrero Medical, Inc., the developer of ... the appointment of George M. Rapier, III , MD, ... TX , WellMed is one of the nation,s largest ... HMO members in Texas and ... of his own internal medicine practice, he has been instrumental ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: