Navigation Links
Elevating Manganese Levels hold back HIV

According to researchers at the Hopkins University, working with yeast have made the unexpected discovery the metal manganese can block the replication of HIV inside cells, a finding that could lead to a whole new class of treatments for the virus that causes AIDS.// A team of researchers at Hopkins University in Baltimore found that, human immunodeficiency virus depends on an enzyme called reverse transcriptase to replicate, and higher than normal levels of manganese lower the activity of a similar enzyme used by a virus-like component of yeast.

Further research determined increasing manganese also lowers the activity of HIV's reverse transcriptase, which could block replication of the virus and help prevent it from causing acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

According to Jef Boeke, professor of molecular biology at Hopkins University, if drugs could be grown that increase manganese levels, it would be a innovative approach to treating HIV. Boeke said his team currently is looking for drugs that do just that. The higher levels of manganese in yeast were caused by a defective gene called PRM1, which produces a protein that shuttles manganese out of cells. The Hopkins scientists, felt that they human equivalent of PRM1 will be a good target for drugs designed to treat HIV infection. Boeke cautioned, however, it is not yet known whether raising manganese levels in humans will have any therapeutic effect.

One of the first treatments for HIV infection, the antiretroviral zidovudine (AZT), targeted reverse transcriptase. The virus is notorious for developing resistance to drugs, however, so new treatments are needed to keep it in check. Drugs that target PRM1 and increase manganese levels may help prevent the development of resistance, Boeke said.

HIV may still develop resistance but "a new class of agents would still be really useful because what has really been successful is combining drugs," he said.

Carl Dief fenbach, associate director for basic sciences in the AIDS program at the National Institutes of Health's Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Md., said the research was done in a test tube and adjusting metal ion concentrations in the body could have completely different results.

Dieffenbach told UPI the study will spur a flurry of research to further understand whether the PRM1 gene is a viable target to develop drugs around. His first step will be to do a study in mice. At the same time, researchers also can look at people infected with HIV and see if they can detect any with a defect in the PRM1 gene. If they do find a defect, they can determine if they are protected from HIV infection or have a slower progression of disease.


'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Levels Of Blood Proteins May Help Heart Disease Care
2. Elevated Ozone Levels Hurt Sperm Count
3. High Levels of Protein Linked to Brain Shrinkage
4. Chickens Found To Have High Levels of Arsenic
5. Low Protein Levels A Possible Indicator For A Miscarriage
6. Low Testosterone Levels the Cause Of Depression In Men
7. Weather Found To Play An Important Role In Cholesterol Levels
8. Education Levels Found To Predict Stress
9. Effective Control Of Blood Sugar Levels
10. Elevated Blood Sugar Levels A Risk Factor Of Heart Disease
11. Better Control Of Sugar Levels
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... won the $30,000 Perlman Grand Prize of the 2016 Wharton Business Plan ... the Michelson People’s Choice Award, and the Committee Award for Most ‘Wow Factor,’ ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... patented products, announces the Gyrociser, an exercise invention which aids in proper muscle ... says Scott Cooper, CEO and Creative Director of World Patent Marketing. "Globalization has ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... , ... April 29, 2016 , ... Melanoma is the deadliest type of skin cancer. ... for the majority of skin cancer deaths. More than 10,000 people are expected to die ... diagnosis is 62, it is the one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in young ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... ... City based oral and maxillofacial surgeon Dr. Majid Jamali is an expert in ... apnea. Dr. Jamali is proud to offer this permanent solution to patients who suffer from ... bones. This surgery is performed to correct the alignment of the jaw. It is beneficial ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... For those ... as the meal to miss. That was among the many new lifestyle diet tips ... a recent Sharon Kleyne Hour® Power of Water® radio show. Bonny and Lawrence noted ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... 2016  Hologic, Inc. (Nasdaq: HOLX ... the fiscal second quarter ended March 26, 2016.  ... increased 41.2%, and non-GAAP diluted EPS of $0.47 ... on a reported basis, and 6.3% on a ... another good quarter, highlighted by 14.6% growth in ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... -- Elekta today announced that its leading-edge ... focal point of seven scientific presentations at ESTRO 35, ... & Oncology, taking place April 29 - May 3. ... and a high-field MRI scanner with sophisticated software that ... in real time. The MR-linac is designed to improve ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... SHAWNEE, Kan. , April 27, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... Martabano , a senior from the University of ... winner of the Bayer Excellence in Communication Award ... veterinary schools, which were awarded a total of ... Over the last four years, Bayer has provided ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: