Navigation Links
Einstein's Tea Leaves Inspire New Blood Separation Technique

Scientists at Monash University in Australia have developed a process for rapidly and efficiently separating blood plasma at the microscopic level without any moving parts, potentially allowing doctors //to do blood tests without sending samples to a laboratory.

The new method uses the same principle that causes tea leaves to accumulate at the center of the bottom in a stirred teacup, a phenomenon first explained by Einstein in the 1920s.

Separating blood plasma from red blood cells, proteins and other microscopic particles is an essential step in many common medical tests, including those for cholesterol levels, drugs in athletes, blood types in donors and glucose levels in diabetics. Current testing requires samples to be taken in a doctor's office and sent off to a laboratory and analyzed with a large centrifuge, a process that can take several days.

In the new method, a tiny amount of blood enters a fluid chamber, and a needle tip is placed close to the surface of the blood at an angle. A voltage is applied to the needle, generating ions around its tip that repel the oppositely charged ions close to it. This creates an airflow known as "ionic wind" that sweeps across the surface of the blood, causing it to circulate. The microscopic particles in the blood travel in a downward spiral because of the needle's angle relative to the surface.

When the fluid begins to circulate, one might intuitively expect the microscopic particles such as red blood cells would be pulled to the outside wall of the chamber owing to centrifugal force. But because of a phenomenon called the 'tea leaf paradox,' the particles are instead pulled inward near the bottom of the chamber. Einstein proposed an explanation to this phenomenon in 1926 when he noticed that tea leaves collected at the center of the bottom of a stirred teacup instead of being expelled outward.

The tiny chamber of blood, like the teacup, is a cylinder of liquid that is rota ted at the top while the base remains stationary. To satisfy a zero-velocity condition at the base, an inward force near the bottom of the liquid is generated, suppressing the centrifugal force there. Thus the microscopic particles spiral inward toward the bottom of the chamber like a miniature tornado, leaving a clear layer of plasma above.

Yeo anticipates the technology could be incorporated into a chip roughly the size of a credit card. He said the devices could be produced cheaply with current manufacturing techniques -- about 50 cents per chip -- but could still be five to 10 years away from mass production.

Source-Newswise
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Cancer-causing Property Of Teflon Leaves US Regulators Concerned
2. Strange Theft Of HIV Infected Blood Leaves Authorities Puzzled
3. Mass Leave By Doctors Leaves Patients Helpless
4. Anti Inflammatory Evaluation Of Plumeria Acuminata Leaves
5. United Kingdom: Maternity Units Exposed! Leaves Much to Be Desired
6. No Smoking Day Inspires Many to Kick the Butt
7. Recommendations for Treatment of Blood Pressue
8. Blood Cells Capable of Regenerating Liver
9. Blood clots likely in long travel
10. Hemochromatosis Patients Blood is Safe
11. Blood transfusions beneficial after heart attacks
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:1/17/2017)... ... January 17, 2017 , ... A prescription medication bottle, pocket knife, luggage ... Cradle to Cradle Product Design Challenge , the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation ... circular design challenges scheduled to run through early 2018. The challenges are presented by ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... 2017 , ... SC&H Group, a leading audit, tax, and consulting firm, announced ... Advisory Services practice . Rossi is the third technology consulting leader to join SC&H ... grows, and the practice continues to expand.     , Bringing more than 25 years of ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... January 17, 2017 , ... The Sharie Withers ... has announced the latest beneficiary of their thriving community involvement program. The current ... to fulfilling the dreams of terminally ill patients. Donations to this worthy cause ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... Falls, NJ (PRWEB) , ... January 17, 2017 ... ... and Learning Center and the Montclair State University’s Athletic Training Education program forged ... State University’s Athletic Training Education Program, which is consists of both student ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... York, NY (PRWEB) , ... January 16, 2017 , ... ... grand opening of a new showroom in East Hanover, New Jersey. , “We are ... Gym Source. “The new innovative in-store concept is designed to give clients a seamless ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/17/2017)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of ... to their offering. ... The global fluoropolymer market in the healthcare industry to grow ... Global Fluoropolymer Market in the Healthcare Industry 2016-2020, has been ... experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... , Jan. 17, 2017 Following an ... today praised the Food and Drug Administration,s (FDA,s) ... Human Drug Products by Pharmacies and Outsourcing Facilities." ... proposed limitation on pre-packaging -- which would have ... costs to long term care (LTC) pharmacies.  ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ReportsnReports.com adds "Anaphylaxis - Pipeline Review, H2 2016" ... Anaphylaxis,s therapeutic pipeline with comprehensive information on the therapeutic development ... assessment by drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of ... featured news and press releases. ... Complete report on H2 2016 pipeline ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: