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DVT Treatment Vacuums Away Blood Clots – Prevents Disabilit

A study presented today demonstrates that a new technique safely and effectively removes blood clots in the body faster, reducing// patient risk for pulmonary embolism and disability.

The interventional radiology treatment was also shown to have a positive impact on patients’ quality of life, relieving symptoms such as pain and swelling, as well as greatly improving their ability to be active. The “rapid lysis” technique combines a clot-dissolving drug with a clot removal device, thus improving the breaking up and dissolving of the clot, which is then vacuumed out of the vein and into the catheter, nonsurgically clearing away the deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Blood flow is restored throughout the leg, resolving symptoms. Patients in the study had extensive, large volume DVT that commonly ran the length of the leg from the ankle to the pelvis, and often into the vena cava. Although the body may eventually dissolve clots, in the time needed to do so, permanent damage to the vein may occur, causing permanent disability and pain. In addition, previous studies have shown that clots in the larger veins will rarely clear on their own. The research was presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology’s 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting.

“The new combination technique offers a significant advancement in the treatment of DVT, often allowing the interventional radiologists to break up the clot in one treatment. It has worked on even the largest, most difficult clots and could become the new standard technique, potentially changing the way all DVT patients are treated,” says Mark J. Garcia, M.D., interventional radiologist at Christiana Care Health System, Wilmington, DE.

This treatment worked on the largest, most difficult clots, allowing resolution of DVT quickly and safely while restoring blood flow in the vein. The treatment can reduce the length of a hospital stay, thus reducing costs. The current standard catheter-directed thromb olysis treatment uses a clot-dissolving drug only and, although highly effective, can take two to four days to work. This increases the patients’ risk of bleeding as well as increasing their stay in the ICU. Although the catheter-directed thrombolysis technique has been available for about a decade, many DVT patients don’t receive it. Instead, many patients are treated with blood thinners alone which can help prevent a life threatening pulmonary embolism, but do not help dissolve the clot. Long-term studies show that fifty percent of people with leg DVT treated with blood thinners alone develop the sequela of DVT, known as post-thrombotic syndrome. Post-thrombotic syndrome is caused by a combination of damage to the vein valves, as well as blocked blood flow in the vein from residual thrombus (clot). This condition is characterized by chronic leg pain and swelling which can lead to skin thickening and ulceration.

“Post-thrombotic syndrome is a common complication of DVT that is under-recognized and potentially preventable if we are able to dissolve the clots early, before permanent damage to the vein occurs,” says Garcia. “If we treat these patients within 14 days of their onset of symptoms, we are very successful in clearing the clot. Because the treatment is more rapid, safe and effective, patients are more likely to receive it and prevention of permanent damage is more likely to occur.”

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