Navigation Links
British Scientists Discover New Protein to Treat Epilepsy and Schizophrenia

Curbing excitation through suppressing communication between the cells could be one way of treating diseases such as epilepsy and schizophrenia.

Researchers at the University of Bristol seem to have pitched upon a protein that could do the trick. The SUMO protein acts to damp down the amount of information transmitted to cells.

And so boosting the level of the protein in the brain could the key to tackling diseases such as epilepsy and schizophrenia, the Bristol scientists think.

There are 100 million nerve cells in the brain, which each have 10,000 connections, called synapses, which link to other nerves cells.

These connections chemically transmit information that control brain function via proteins called receptors. These processes are believed to be the basis of learning and memory.

In a healthy brain, synapses can modify how efficiently they work, by increasing or decreasing the amount of information transmitted.

Having too much information is a problem, but so is having too little which can cause conditions including coma.

The researchers, who carried out work on rats, found that when one type of receptor, the kainate receptor, receives a chemical signal a small protein called SUMO attaches itself.

SUMO pulls the kainate receptor out of the synapse, stopping it from receiving information from other cells and making the cell less excitable.

The scientists who discovered SUMO's role say it is interesting because it means the receptor is not destroyed, but simply lies dormant, meaning the dangers of completely cutting off communication between cells should be avoided.

Professor Jeremy Henley, who led the research, said: "We have found one mechanism that regulates the flow of information between cells in the brain.

"It is possible that increasing the amount of SUMO attached to kainate receptors - which would red uce communication between the cells - could be a way to treat epilepsy by preventing over-excitation."

The researchers say that their findings could also provide insight into other brain diseases that are characterised by too much synaptic activity, like schizophrenia, which could one day lead to new drugs.

Professor Ley Sander, an epilepsy expert at the Institute of Neurology, said the work was at early stages but was interesting.

"This is an additional part of the puzzle and it is interesting to learn more about brain processes.

"But we are talking about five to 10 years if this is really going to make a big difference." Jo Loughran, of the mental health charity Rethink, said: "We welcome this exciting new research and hope that one day it could make a difference to the thousands of people living with severe mental illnesses like schizophrenia.

"We would like to see continued investment in such research that will lead to a third generation of antipsychotic medicines with fewer side effects."


'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Designer baby for British couple
2. British Authorities Seize Spurious Drugs
3. Collaborations planned between British Organization and Indian health care industry
4. British Healthcare Mission Explores Partnership Possibilities With Indian Healthcare Sector
5. British Women Flies to India for Treatment of Breast Cancer
6. Sharp Increase In Morning-After Pill Sales Among British Women
7. British company developing ‘Safer Cigarettes
8. British man Recovered from HIV
9. British medical education suffers shortage of bodies
10. Relief For British MS Patients: Cannabis-Based Oral Spray
11. British Scientists Doubt Delhi Doctor’s Stem Cell Claim
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/24/2017)... , ... May 24, 2017 ... ... the female reproductive tract in which the endometrial lining of the uterus ... inflammation and pain. Patients experiencing painful intercourse, painful periods, pelvic pain, or ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... May 24, 2017 , ... ... offering holistic pediatric dentistry options for its patients on Long Island, New York. ... entire physical well being, and is one of the biggest trends in dentistry ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... May 24, 2017 , ... Technique, technique, technique – with a dash ... weights for strength training and exercise or simply lifting heavy objects, advises Dr. Kaliq ... is everything,” Dr. Chang says. “Improper technique in lifting anything heavy or an attempt ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Allegheny Health Network and the Alexis Joy ... Women’s Behavioral Health at West Penn Hospital , a unique facility that will ... pregnancy-related depression. Construction of the Center is underway with a scheduled opening in ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 23, 2017 , ... i2i Population Health, a ... KLAS category winner, has named Daniel P. Bullington as chief technology officer. , ... platform and product offerings,” says Justin Neece, president. “Daniel is an excellent fit ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/4/2017)... and SAN DIEGO , ... and Gynecologists (ACOG) 2017 Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting— ... self-contained, illuminating medical devices, today announced the launch of ... its OfficeSPEC and ER-SPEC vaginal ... addition of extra-small and extra-large sizes makes OBP Medical,s ...
(Date:5/4/2017)... 2017  A new tight-tolerance microextrusion medical tubing ... materials, is being launched by Natvar, a Tekni-Plex ... in recent years to service a wide variety ... More expensive materials such as glass and fluoropolymers ... to their ability to consistently hold tolerances. This ...
(Date:5/3/2017)... , May 3, 2017 A ... any hospital or healthcare facility. Commonly referred to ... is equipped with diagnostic imaging technology to give ... the heart. In these spaces, a team of ... balloon angioplasty, percutaneous coronary intervention, congenital heart defect ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: