Navigation Links
Bacteria Fighter Goes Where Antibiotics Can't

Researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have figured out a way to turn one of nature’s most powerful microbe //fighters into a guided missile that strikes specifically at a common bacteria responsible for serious infections throughout the body.

Professor Amram Mor of the Biotechnology and Food Engineering Faculty and his colleagues revamped an antimicrobial peptide, a small molecule made of short chains of amino acids that attacks Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

P aeruginosa is the bacterium behind serious lung infections in people with cystic fibrosis and some types of pneumonia and meningitis, as well as less serious but widespread infections such as “swimmer’s ear” and urinary tract infections.

The research was reported in the January 26 issue of the journal Chemistry and Biology. Common antibiotic medicines used to treat infections are increasingly thwarted by new strains of drug-resistant bacteria. Unlike most antibiotics, antimicrobial peptides can sidestep such resistance mechanisms and destroy by brute force, often simply ripping a hole in a targeted cell. For this reason, “antimicrobial peptides present an obvious advantage over conventional antibiotics,” said Mor.

Yet one of the features that makes the peptides so useful—their ability to kill a variety of invaders from bacteria to cancer cells—makes them hard to deploy as a treatment against specific infections. Their “non-specific” action can also destroy normal red blood cells.

The number and order of amino acids in an antimicrobial peptide determines how it recognizes and attacks an invading microbe. Some previous studies have shown that removing amino acids from one end of a peptide can boost its antibacterial properties. However, these shortened peptides are also more deadly to red blood cells.

To build a more useful and less toxic antimicrobial peptide, Mor and colleagues removed a few amino acids from one end of a dermaseptin peptide and replaced it with a fatty acid molecule. (Dermaseptins are a well-known family of peptides that destroy a wide range of microbes). The study shows for the first time that a fatty acid can replace part of a shortened peptide, which may lower the costs of manufacturing such peptides, according to the researchers.

The change made this particular peptide deadly accurate against P. aeruginosa while leaving other bacteria alone. The new peptide was also 60 times less likely to adhere to red blood cells.

“Many experts believe that one of the factors that might hamper the commercial use of antimicrobial peptides is their prohibitive cost. Therefore, smaller means cheaper and in this case, more potent,” Mor said.

Mor said the procedure might be used to create a variety of designer peptides that latch on different microbes, and that his lab will work on repeating the strategy with other peptide chains. The researchers also hope to test these new peptides against infections in animals.

Source-Newsise
SRI
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Bacterial discovery may help CF patients
2. Cure for Bacterial Meningitis
3. Before Weight Loss Surgery One Should Get Tested for Bacteria
4. Molecule That Aids Bacterial Infections Identified
5. Moms Stomach Bacteria Can Cause Leukaemia In Children
6. Bacteria Evolve Armamentarium Against Antibiotics By ‘Stealing’ Gens
7. Bacterial Photographs Created By Student Scientists!
8. Bacterial infestation in food very critical!
9. Tooth Decay Bacteria Unaffected By Altered Biochemical Pathway
10. Beneficial Symbiotic Relationship Between Ants And Bacteria.
11. Tamiflu substrate produced from Bioengineered Bacteria
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/23/2017)... VA (PRWEB) , ... August 23, 2017 , ... The Stevie® Awards have announced the ... Business Awards , the world’s premier business awards competition. , Nominees in the 2017 IBAs ... determined by a points system based on the total number of awards won in the ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... August 23, 2017 , ... Boling ... returned home to Indiana, and is now seeing patients at Boling Vision Center’s ... specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of eye disease, medical retina, high-technology cataract ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... August 23, 2017 , ... ... Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons , points out that therapeutic modalities (physical therapy) is ... injury. According to the report, a wider scope of physical therapy options is ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... Western ... spoke at a popular international aesthetics conference for medical professionals about the positive ... patients’ health and his growing practice. , Dr. George K. Ibrahim ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... ... Glass is new to the Texas market, but is proudly managed by widely recognized All ... models, in Grand Prairie, TX, located in the center of the DFW Metroplex, the fourth ... for the past 40 years with 32 convenient locations in Texas, Nevada and California resulting ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/14/2017)... HACKENSACK, N.J. and PETACH TIKVAH, ... Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: BCLI), a leading developer of adult ... for the second quarter ending June 30, 2017. ... advanced stages of preparing for our pivotal Phase 3 ... Chaim Lebovits , President and Chief Executive Officer ...
(Date:8/8/2017)... Second-quarter 2017 revenues of $876 million ... continuing operations Second-quarter 2017 ... million Second-quarter 2017 Sterile ... Second-quarter 2017 adjusted diluted earnings ... to $0.93 Second-quarter 2017 ...
(Date:8/7/2017)... -- Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO), the nation,s largest independent specialty ... 2017.  All comparisons, unless otherwise noted, are to the quarter ... Second Quarter 2017 Highlights include: ... of 3.5% Total prescriptions dispensed of 220,000, ... versus 7.6% Gross profit per prescription ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: