Navigation Links
Anti Allergy Drugs Reduce Tumor Growth

Researchers at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center suggest that the use of an anti allergy drug over the span of 40 years reduced the tumor growth in the// human pancreas and also resulted in improved effect of chemotherapy.

The Journal of the National Cancer Institute issued on Dec.20 reported that a combination of chemotherapy and the drug cromolyn is three times more effective than just the administration of chemotherapy agent gemcitabine.

The finding may lead to a treatment advance for patients with pancreatic cancer, believed to be the most lethal of all cancers. More than 95 percent of patients diagnosed with the disease die from it, and half of those deaths occur in the first six months after diagnosis.

"Our goal is to offer longer life to these patients, and the combination of these two agents may well do that," says the study's lead author, Craig Logsdon, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Cancer Biology.

Logsdon is working with physicians at M. D. Anderson to prepare for a clinical trial. Although cromolyn is off patent and widely available, it has been used only as a topical agent (through an inhaler, nasal spray and eye drops), so the research team is studying how to deliver the drug internally.

"Cromolyn seems to reduce survival mechanisms in pancreatic cancer cells enough that when gemcitabine is added, the chemotherapy is more effective," Logsdon says. "This is good, because chemotherapy normally has very little effect in patients."

The JNCI study demonstrates in mouse models of human pancreatic cancer that the cromolyn-gemcitabine combination reduced cancer growth by 85 percent compared to control animals, Logsdon says. "Cromolyn used alone actually had a good effect on reduction of tumors compared to control animals, which surprised us," he adds. It reduced tumor growth by 70 percent, compared to growth reduction of 50 percent when gemcitabine was used as a single ag ent, compared to control animals.

No one knows exactly how cromolyn works to control allergies. However, Dr. Logsdon has found that cromolyn can bind a specific protein produced by cancer cells and block that protein's ability to interact with a receptor that stimulates cancer cell growth, survival, and spreading. The relationship between how the drug controls allergies and its anti-tumor effect in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. "It may be possible that cromolyn has more than one target that influences cancer," he says.

Logsdon discovered the cancer-stimulating protein, determined how it triggers tumor growth and spread, and identified cromolyn as an inhibitor. "Through serendipity and basic science sleuthing we may now have something that helps patients," he says.

The study culminates Logsdon's five-year search for an agent to treat pancreatic cancer.

Logsdon searched for genes that produced proteins secreted only by cancer cells, which would then loop around and act on the cancer cell through a receptor on the cell surface. "That way, we could have two potential drug targets - the secreted protein and the receptor," he said.

Out of a long list of such genes, Logsdon and his research team selected one called "S100P" because it is a member of the large S100 gene family, some of which produce secreted proteins and some of which are associated with other cancers. Further work showed that S100P over-expression was very specific to pancreatic cancer; the protein was not found in normal pancreatic cells. "It is important to embryonic development, but no one knows its physiological role in adult biology," he says.

By using gene-silencing techniques, Logsdon found that when the protein is disabled, cancer growth is slowed. "S100P plays a role in tumor development because it causes cancer cells to grow faster, survive better, and be more invasive," he says.

Logsdon found that S100P interacts with a re ceptor known as "RAGE" which also plays a role in diabetes, arthritis and Alzheimer's disease. If RAGE is blocked in pancreatic cancer cells, addition of synthetic S100P to the tumor does not accelerate growth.

While Logsdon was defining S100P in pancreatic cancer, a Japanese research team working on allergies ran an experiment to see which proteins "stuck" to anti-allergy drugs, including cromolyn. Several members of the S100 family did. Logsdon then discovered that the drug also bound to S100P. He applied cromolyn to laboratory pancreatic cancer cells, and found that tumor growth was slowed. A larger effect was seen when the chemotherapy agent gemcitabine was combined with cromolyn.

Logsdon suspects that cromolyn may have other anti-tumor effects, a theory which he is currently testing. "For me this is pretty thrilling," he says. "In a relatively short time, we have gone all the way from discovering a molecule to preparations for a clinical trial."

Source-Eurekalert
KOM
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Allergy Risk Increased by Kerosene Use
2. Infant Fevers Found to Reduce Allergy Risk Later In Life
3. A Common Cause Of Allergy That Goes Unnoticed
4. Laser Surgery for Allergy
5. The Efficacy Of Allergy Shots Questioned
6. Oral Edible vaccine for Allergy Vaccines
7. Tattoo Wearers Are More Prone To Allergy Risks
8. A Sneak Preview of Human’s Susceptibility to Auto Immune Disease, Allergy, Asthm
9. Allergy Alarm: Sams Choice Milk Chocolate Turns Bitter with Undisclosed Nuts
10. Hope for Dust Mite Allergy Sufferers
11. Effective Vaccine Found For Dust Mite Allergy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/13/2016)... City, Utah (PRWEB) , ... February 13, 2016 , ... When an Au Pair ... Parents aren’t always sure what they are in for and they are often worried things ... more than they were hoping for. This year’s Au Pair of the Year winner’s all ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... San Antonio, TX (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 , ... ... of love, as expressed in Blue SKies Buddha, the biography of Rama - Dr. ... in fact a love story, the love of a Buddhist teacher for teaching and ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... ... Trends: , Back to the Future , Feb. 25, 2016 — 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 ... don’t learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” , An analysis of CDRH’s enforcement ... that takes time. , Take a close look at the warning letters the agency ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... ... Coco Libre, the maker of coconut water beverages with a purpose, is ... Coco Libre will offer musicians and celebrities the company’s signature Organic Coconut Water, a ... suite, held this year at the W Hollywood Hotel, has become a pre-show “must” ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... , ... Every winter, someone is killed, injured or loses a home in ... part of the Allegheny Health Network, has partnered with Etna Volunteer Fire Department, ... Space” campaign. , “Space Heaters Need Space” aims to bring awareness to ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/12/2016)... Feb. 12, 2016 /PRNewswire/ - Demers Ambulances announces its first delivery ... Okaloosa County Emergency Medical Services (EMS) ... and one LT2 van. Quality Emergency Vehicles in ... for the sale.  This is the latest in Demers, ongoing ... Vice President at Demers. --> Benoit LaFortune , ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ALISO VIEJO , Kalifornien, 12. Februar 2016 ... es mit der Aufnahme von Patienten für eine ... Embolisation von Aneurysmen („WEB") speziell für die Behandlung ... Laurent Spelle , MD, Leiter der Neuroradiologie an ... , Frankreich, und Hauptprüfarzt der CLARYS-Studie hat den ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... and SEOUL, South Korea , ... and Macrogen, Inc. today announced they will form ... procedures for precision medicine in cancer. The goal ... DEPArray™ digital-sorting technology with Macrogen,s high-throughput Next Generation ... under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) of ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: