Navigation Links
Activated T-Cells Could Help In The Battle Against HIV

Researchers have explained that on altering the immune cells and incorporating it into the vaccine they could develop a therapeutic treatment for AIDS. //

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh have claimed that they are of the belief that if patients with HIV, subject their immune system cells through a laboratory version of boot camp, it could help in their fight against the disease. Announcing their findings at the AIDS 2006 conference in Toronto, yesterday they explained that this would be in core concept for developing a novel therapeutic vaccine that would be loaded with a patient's own souped up dendritic cells, which have been galvanized in gathering other cells of the immune system for fighting the virus, which is unique to that individual.

At the XVI International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2006), University of Pittsburgh researchers will describe one of the steps that is key to the approach's success – modifying the dendritic cells in such a way that they will get the attention of killer T cells. Results of these studies will be incorporated into the protocol for a clinical trial of the vaccine, which is expected to begin later this year.

“The goal of the approach is to teach killer T cells to more efficiently find, detect and destroy HIV infected cells. Our vaccine, as an immunotherapy, is custom-designed to target the unique virus that has evolved in each individual being treated. A patient's own dendritic cells together with their unique viral antigens comprise the main elements of the vaccine,” said Charles R. Rinaldo, Jr., Ph.D., professor and chairman of the department of infectious diseases and microbiology at Pitt's Graduate School of Public Health (GSPH) and the study's senior author.

In particular, the approach aims to activate a type of T cell called a CD8, or cytotoxic, T cell, also known as a killer T cell. In a typical immune response, CD8 cells are called to action by dendritic cells. Person s infected with HIV and being treated with antiretroviral drugs can control but not eliminate HIV infection. If the drug therapy is discontinued, the virus comes roaring back. Dr. Rinaldo and others have hypothesized that this is because the drug therapy does not completely restore CD8 cell immunity to the virus. So, in trying to figure a way to activate the CD8 cells to more efficiently control HIV, the researchers focused on a molecule called interleuken-12 (IL-12). When dendritic cells recognize and capture viral antigens, they work together with CD4 T cells to release IL-12, which in turn triggers stimulation of killer CD8 cells that are specific to the virus.

Reporting at AIDS 2006, Xiao-Li Huang, M.D., research assistant professor of infectious diseases and microbiology at GSPH, said that IL-12 could be increased when CD40 ligand, a substance that binds to certain immune cells, and interferon gamma were added to dendritic cells.

In the study, white blood cells called monocytes were obtained from both HIV patients and individuals not infected with the virus. In the laboratory, the researchers coaxed them to differentiate into mature dendritic cells, and they were grown in culture with the addition of various substances to boost their potency. Separately, the researchers combined a small amount of the patient's HIV with their CD4 cells, in order to "super infect" them. In these now super-infected cells, the researchers inactivated the virus by promoting a process called apoptosis, or programmed cell death. In their dying state and with trace amounts of viral antigen still present, these CD4 cells were placed in culture with the beefed up dendritic cells. Recognizing the cells as foreign, the dendritic cells processed the antigen. Importantly, the dendritic cells presenting the HIV fragments were able to stimulate CD8 cells when the two cell types were combined.

“This model of T cell activation by dendritic cells provides a bas is for immunotherapy trials of persons with HIV infection,” said Dr. Huang.

The trial should be enrolling patients within the year, pending approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The researchers have already completed a similar trial in 18 patients that proved the approach is safe. In that trial, the vaccine was derived using a readily available HIV protein. Even with this somewhat generic approach, T cell immunity was enhanced.

“Quite likely, it will be a combination of anti-viral drugs and some sort of immunotherapy, such as a therapeutic vaccine, that will be the most effective weapon against HIV,” noted Dr. Rinaldo.

Source: EureAlert.
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Activated charcoal for poisoning treatment
2. Distinct Brain Sections Are Activated While Making Risky Decisions
3. Scientists Identify Genes Activated During Learning and Memory
4. Lean Protein Could Be Key to Obesity Drugs
5. Nasal Spray Could Take Drugs Direct to Brain.
6. Nasal Spray Could Take Drugs Directly to Brain
7. Oxygen Usage During Exercise Could Indicate Heart Problems
8. Ultrasound Screening Could Improve The Outcome Of Critically ill Patients
9. Anger Could Be Linked To Weight Gain
10. A Seizure Late In Life Could be A Stroke Warning
11. New Findings Could Reduce The Extent Of Spinal Cord Injuries
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/3/2016)... ... ... In April, Amerec launched a new website designed with optimal user experience in ... sauna solutions. , First, the Amerec website has been redesigned to be easier to ... features, especially the Steam Builder Tool , to both mobile and desktop devices. ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... , ... May 03, 2016 , ... For over 23 ... medical providers to build the leading network of doctors and therapists treating personal injury ... founder of the distinguished Bay Chiropractic and Rehabilitation in Santa Monica, Doctors ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... ... for the 31st annual AIDS Walk Boston & 5K Run , which will take ... regularly draws thousands of participants, making it AIDS Action Committee’s largest annual fundraiser. The Walk ... Track & Field Association. , The AIDS Walk & 5K Run will begin and ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... Santa Monica, California (PRWEB) , ... May 03, 2016 , ... ... cosmetic surgery practice in late 2014, incorporating the injectable filler into his menu ... journeys of aesthetic transformation. Now, more than a year later, he’s still improving his ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... May 03, 2016 , ... University of the People, ... launch of its Associates and Bachelor's degrees in Health Studies. Leading figures are ... Dr. Torsten N. Wiesel; Chairman and CEO of Fortune 500® company Henry Schein, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/2/2016)... , May 2, 2016 ... reach USD 11.1 billion by 2024, according to ... Inc. Major drivers of the sonography market include ... and government recommendations for periodic ultrasound screenings of ... (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150105/723757 ) High ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... 29, 2016 ReportsnReports.com adds ... market research report that provides an overview of ... at various stages, therapeutics assessment by drug target, ... and molecule type, along with latest updates, and ... key players involved in the therapeutic development for ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... , April 29, 2016 ... Directeur Financier Sanofi, leader ... publie ses résultats pour le premier ... Groupe, Jérôme Contamine, commente les résultats ... les perspectives pour le reste de ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: