Navigation Links
A Protein from Primate may Save Humans from HIV !

Protein can efficiently stop HIV virus from entering and infecting blood cells, according to researchers of the University of Central Florida. // Advancement has made man to stop producing this protein that was produced by our predecessors.

HIV-1 has a technique to escape the antiviral drugs targeted against it. It does so by frequently getting mutated. But a research team led by Associate Professor Alexander Cole of UCF's Burnett College of Biomedical Sciences has demonstrated that over 100 days the virus develops only weak resistance to retrocyclin, a defense peptide still found in monkeys and lower primates.

If additional laboratory tests demonstrate only weak resistance, Cole will study how retrocyclin could be developed into a drug designed to prevent the HIV virus from entering human cells.

Cole is also working with Henry Daniell, a UCF professor of molecular biology and microbiology, to develop a way to grow retrocyclin through genetically engineered tobacco plants. The retrocyclin gene would be incorporated into the chloroplast genome of tobacco cells before the plants grow. Daniell has developed a similar approach to growing anthrax vaccine in tobacco plants.

An inexpensive way to produce the drug with only a small amount of tobacco would help to make it accessible in areas such as Southeast Asia, Africa and the Caribbean where the disease spreads most quickly.

"If we could develop retrocyclin in plants and produce enough of the drug cheaply, we could potentially save a lot of lives," Cole said.

Cole was recently awarded about $4 million of National Institutes of Health grants through 2011 for the HIV-1 research and similar studies. The grants were provided through the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Cole started his research into theta-defensins at the Univer sity of California, Los Angeles, before he moved to UCF in 2003. Drs. Otto Yang and Robert Lehrer, infectious disease specialists at UCLA, and researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Emory University are collaborating with Cole.

There are three classes of defensin peptides, and most research around the world has focused on alpha and beta defensins, the two types that humans still make. Cole studies theta-defensins called retrocyclins, which are no longer made by humans or advanced primates such as chimpanzees. However, theta-defensins are more active against HIV-1 than the other two types of defensins and can be developed in laboratories, two features that suggest retrocyclins still could become an effective way to fight the virus.

HIV-1 is the most common form of the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS. The disease is often transmitted sexually, and the drugs produced from Cole's research would be applied to the vagina in the form of a gel or cream. Many of the laboratory tests have shown that retrocyclin can prevent HIV-1 infection of human vaginal tissue.

Retrocyclin was still an effective inhibitor of HIV-1 even after 100 days of continuous exposure to human cells in a laboratory setting. Cole and his team are encouraged that only minimal resistance of the virus occurred during that time. Higher resistance levels make it more difficult to develop drugs to fight the virus because doses must be increased substantially over time.

The exact reason why resistance does not develop quickly with retrocyclin is unclear, but it may be a result of retrocyclin interacting with more than one target on both the cell and virus. Viruses that have to defeat more than one antiviral mechanism often develop resistance at a much slower pace.

The next phase of Cole's research will delve more into the mutations that HIV-1 can take in an effort to minimize them as much as possible. Many series of laboratory tests would need to be completed before clinical trials could begin no earlier than 2009.

Cole's findings were published in the June 1 issue of The Journal of Immunology, a top journal in the fields of immunology, molecular biology and microbiology.

Source: Eurekalert
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Lean Protein Could Be Key to Obesity Drugs
2. Evidence Links Protein Damage to Neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinsons and Alzheimers
3. Unravelling the secrets of ‘Huntingtin’ Protein - towards the treatment of ‘Huntingtons’ Disase
4. Unravelling the secrets of ‘Huntingtin’ Protein - towards the treatment of Huntingtins’ Disese
5. Protein in urine foresees heart disease
6. Levels Of Blood Proteins May Help Heart Disease Care
7. Protein signals need for heart surgery
8. Protein and fat improve memory
9. Clotting Protein plays a role in nerve repair
10. High Levels of Protein Linked to Brain Shrinkage
11. Protein can change worn muscle fibres
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... The American College ... to Carol Friedman, PhD, FACMI, during the Opening Session of AMIA’s Annual Symposium in ... , In honor of Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the field of medical ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ANGELES (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... Parsa Mohebi Hair Restoration, has recently contributed a medical article to the newly ... on cosmetictown.com. Dr. Mohebi’s article spotlights the hair transplant procedure known as ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... On Saturday, October ... treadmill relay – Miles by Moonlight to raise money for the American Heart Association ... more. , Teams will work together to keep their treadmills moving for 5 ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... in property taxes a year. In some states—like New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, ... contrast, many overseas retirement havens have extremely low property-tax rates, which contributes to ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... content management, presents its enhanced Pepper Flow promotional review platform at the ... Pepper Flow’s increased insight-driven capabilities help marketers streamline the medical, legal, and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... FRISCO, Texas , Oct. 11, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... healthcare services, has amplified its effort during National ... patients about hereditary cancer risks. ... Journal of Clinical Oncology calculated that more than ... to have inherited mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and ...
(Date:10/7/2017)... , Oct. 6, 2017   Provista, a ... than $100 billion in purchasing power, today announced a ... information. The Newsroom is the online home ... trends, infographics, expert bios, news releases, slideshows and events. ... to a wealth of resources at their fingertips, viewers ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... 4, 2017 OBP Medical , ... medical devices, today announced regulatory approval from ... (or Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA)) to ... surgical retractor with integrated LED light source and ... and exposure of a tissue pocket or cavity ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: