Navigation Links
A New Test Kit to Detect Spoilt Food

A new test kit to quickly and accurately determine if food products are spoiled or safe to eat is being made by Chemists at the University of South Carolina//.

Described today at the 233rd national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the new diagnostic test, which researchers describe as a disposable “dipstick,” is capable of rapidly (less than 5 minutes) detecting the presence of chemicals formed by disease-causing bacteria. In preliminary studies, the test had a 90 percent accuracy rate, the researchers say. The test could help avoid illnesses and even deaths caused by food poisoning, which afflicts several million people each year in the United States alone.

The dipstick test is still in development but could be on store shelves in two to three years, says study leader John J. Lavigne, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the school’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, located in Columbia, S.C.

“There’s no other test like this targeting the consumer market right now that I am aware of,” says Lavigne. “It has the potential to change the way individual diners think about the quality of their food and greatly impact public health.”

Lavigne envisions that consumers will be able to carry the dipsticks with them and use them anywhere, including homes and restaurants.

The new test relies on the detection of a class of chemicals called nonvolatile biogenic amines. These compounds are generated during the bacterial decay of food proteins and are an indirect measurement of the extent of food spoilage. Lavigne and his associates developed special polymers that change color in the presence of these biogenic amines. In lab studies, they tested these polymer biosensors against a variety of fish samples, including fresh salmon, fresh tuna and canned tuna.

The polymers change color in the presence of increasing levels of these biogenic amines to indicate degrees of food spoilage. Specifically, the polymers changed from dark purple to yellow in the presence of badly spoiled fish, while the change was from dark purple to a reddish hue in the presence of mildly spoiled fish, he says. Depending on the degree of freshness identified, the consumer could then decide whether to eat the food or avoid it. To the consumer, the yellow color would clearly be an indication to avoid the fish, Lavigne says. The test is currently designed to be qualitative only and will not identify the specific pathogen present, he notes.

Although fish were used in this study, a similar approach can be applied to other foods, including other meats as well as fruits and vegetables, according to Lavigne. Although many fruits and vegetables contain lower protein levels than meats, preliminary studies also indicate the dipsticks are capable of detecting even small amounts of protein decay caused by bacterial activity, he says. More detailed tests on these other food types are planned.

Other than tell-tale clues of food spoilage such as foul smells and the appearance of mold, spoilage sometimes can be difficult to detect by the average consumer. Current scientific methods used to identify foodborne pathogens often require expensive equipment, are time consuming (ranging from hours to days) and involve complicated analyses carried out by trained professionals.

The researchers are working to improve the speed, sensitivity and accuracy of the new test. But Lavigne notes that no ‘freshness’ test will substitute for the importance of proper food safety, including optimal storage, cleaning and cooking. Funding for the study was provided by the University of South Carolina and Research Corporation, a private foundation that advances scientific research.

Source-Eurekalet
PRI
'"/>




Related medicine news :

1. Detecting anomalies in heart rythm
2. Detecting brain aneurysms
3. Detection of Cancer
4. Prototype Detector detects Anthrax Quickly
5. Detecting Colorectal Cancer
6. Early Detection Of Prostate Cancer
7. Skin Cancer “Reflection” Detectin
8. Scanning Combo Helps Detect Lung Cancer
9. Early Detection of Lung Cancer
10. Detect masses in the breast
11. Photographs An Effective Tool In Detecting Skin Cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:12/8/2016)... , ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... Chester County, a Property owned by an affiliate of Seavest, has won a ... Penn Medicine Southern Chester County ambulatory care center (ACC) was named “Best New ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... David J. Dykeman ... law firm Greenberg Traurig, LLP, will speak at DeviceTalks West, Dec. 12, 2016, at ... DeviceTalks series, and attorneys from the firm’s global Life Sciences & Medical Technology Group ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Somerset, N.J. (PRWEB) , ... December 08, 2016 ... ... advanced delivery technologies and development solutions for drugs, biologics and consumer health products, ... The PSCI was set up in 2006 as a non-profit organization to unite ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... surgery as possible. With this in mind, SIGVARIS has created a new line ... clot) during bed rest and provide the benefits of graduated compression when transitioning ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... The Dianne Michael Insurance ... in Hamilton County, is embarking on a charity drive with the aim of ... homes for orphaned or neglected senior dogs in the Cincinnati region, and LuvFurMutts ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/9/2016)... Japan , Dec. 9, 2016 Mitsubishi ... ; President & Representative Director, CEO: Dr. Masayuki ... amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) given edaravone intravenously in 10-14 ... loss as measured by the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised ... International Symposium on ALS/MND in Dublin, ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... ... travel vaccines market to grow at a CAGR of 6.83% during ... and the growth prospects of the global travel vaccines market for ... generated from the sales of various vaccines administered to actively immunize ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... DIEGO , Dec. 9, 2016  Forge ... Evotec AG (Frankfurt Stock Exchange: EVT, TecDAX, ISIN: ... targeting ,LpxC, for the treatment of bacterial infections ... has been recognized as an attractive antibacterial target ... a lack of suitable chemical starting points has ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: