Navigation Links
Family Infighting Hurts the Heart

Spats with spouse, kids, others boosts cardiovascular dangers, study finds

MONDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Clashing with those you're closest to can literally bring on a heap of heartache.

So finds a British study that linked constant bickering to a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease.

When the researchers accounted for other heart risk factors, such as depression or smoking, "negative close relationships" boosted the risk of coronary events by a third, according to a report in the Oct. 8 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Previous research in this area focused more on philosophy," said lead researcher Robert De Vogli, a lecturer in social epidemiology at University College London. "It was assumed that if you were married, you were more likely to be healthy. It was well established that social relationships are important for health."

But more recently, De Vogli said, "research has focused on the quality of social relationships, rather than on their quantity -- emotional support and social support, what kind of interactions you have with this partner."

The study included about 9,000 British civil servants who filled out questionnaires on up to four close relationships, with most attention paid to the primary relationship. Two-thirds of the time, that relationship was with a spouse.

The participants were also asked about the emotional and practical support they received from that person. They were then followed for more than 12 years, with data collected on the incidence of heart disease events in the group.

Any increased heart risk found in the study appeared unrelated to either the participant's sex or social position. And it was not related to the social and emotional support given to an individual, the team found.

Instead, "it is possible that negative aspects of close relationships are more important for the health of individuals because of the power of negative close relationships to activate stronger emotions (worrying and anxiety) and the consequent physiological effects," the researchers wrote.

The impact probably comes from increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system, explained Frank A. Treiber, vice president for research at the Medical College of Georgia, who has also done research on the issue.

"A lot of my work has to do with things such as family relationships, risk factors for hypertension, kids from dysfunctional families," Treiber said. "They are more reactive to stress, which makes their hearts work harder."

The new report on the British study "does add another piece to the puzzle," Treiber said. The link between negative relationships and cardiovascular problems "has held up really well across a 12-year follow-up," he said. Still, more work is needed to determine if the same link exists in social groups other than British civil servants, Trieber noted.

It's possible that the cardiovascular impact of negative relationships can be lessened by counseling and training, he said. "I would say that the family doctor could evaluate the situation and get people referred to someone who would teach them how to cope with stress," Treiber said.

What is different about this study is that the participants defined the closeness of the relationship, noted Carol Shively, a psychologist who is also professor of pathology at Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C.

In previous studies, those definitions came from outside, usually on the basis of the marital status of the participants, she said.

"This captures much more closely what is the importance of social relationships to ourselves," Shively said. That importance has to do with "the emotional quality as perceived by the person who is recording the relationship," she said.

More information

There's more on coping with stress at the American Psychological Association.

SOURCES: Robert De Vogli, Ph.D., lecturer, social epidemiology, University College London, England; Frank A. Treiber, Ph.D., vice president, research, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta; Carol Shively, Ph.D., professor, pathology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, N.C.; Oct. 9, 2007, Annals of Internal Medicine

Copyright©2007 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Family planning with folate
2. Breast cancer in younger women strongly linked to family history
3. Accuracy of Some Natural Family Planning Methods Questioned .
4. Alcoholism Influenced By Both Genetics & Family Environment
5. Restless leg syndrome can be a family trait
6. Merck to pay $ 253.5 million to Vioxx victim family
7. Family Counseling To Encourage Children Eat Healthy
8. Survey finds that discussion with family very crucial in organ donation decision
9. Effective family control measures and stem cell research focus of Indian Government
10. Family history of alcoholism influences reaction to advice
11. Family planning is insisted upon Muslims by Shia cleric
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/9/2015)... Beach, CA (PRWEB) , ... October 09, 2015 ... ... is now offering a special promotion on Invisalign, the orthodontic system that uses ... reasons. The aligners are almost invisible against the teeth, which allow patients to ...
(Date:10/9/2015)... ... October 09, 2015 , ... On Saturday, September 26, ... Jump Rope Championship in Madrid, Spain. Representing both the USA and Sweden in the ... Unders and One-Minute Am Front Crosses, she was awarded 1 Silver and 4 Gold ...
(Date:10/9/2015)... , ... October 09, 2015 , ... ... New Orleans and the surrounding communities, is initiating a combined charity effort with ... for unwanted animals in southern Louisiana. , Animal Rescue New Orleans is ...
(Date:10/9/2015)... , ... October 09, 2015 , ... ... upcoming episode of Innovations with Ed Begley Jr., airing 1st QT 2016 via ... will educate audiences on MMJ Phytotech Limited (MMJ) – a global leader in ...
(Date:10/9/2015)... ... October 09, 2015 , ... ... oldest and largest recreational dispensaries in Colorado, says the latest figures on the ... rapidly and maturing into a legitimate industry. , Last month, according to ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
... of Medicine (BUSM) have found that some medical inpatients ... intervention. The BUSM study appears in the May issue ... . , "Brief intervention shows promise for increasing receipt ... cognitive functioning or an alcohol- attributable diagnosis," said lead ...
... on human genome , , THURSDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- ... has succeeded in sequencing the entire genome of the placid, ... biology of this bovine and related creatures (even humans), and ... two reports in the April 24 issue of Science ...
... Harvard Medical School today announced the launch ... cancer and other prostate conditions understand the issues related ... treatment. The website, , was ... medical oncology and urologic cancer. This website is especially ...
... Keeping Michigan Workers Working!LANSING, Mich., April 23 May ... MICHIGAN will hold a summit involving 120 of Michigan,s ... Workability in Michigan, , ... professions and organizations who are passionate about promoting safer, ...
... MR procedure that uses diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to determine ... benign may help reduce unnecessary breast biopsies, according to ... in Bethesda, MD. DWI is a method that produces ... compartments (diffusion). , The study included 80 patients ...
... tubo ovarian abscesses help women avoid surgery, according to ... MA. Tubo ovarian abscesses (TOAs) are an infected collection ... They can occur in patients with complicated cases of ... study included 54 TOAs in 46 patients. Results showed ...
Cached Medicine News:
(Date:10/8/2015)... , Oct. 8, 2015  Ardelyx, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... on gastrointestinal and cardio-renal diseases, today announced that ... tenapanor, will be presented at the 2015 American ... will include measures of sustained response in IBS-C ... placebo-controlled, randomized Phase 2 trial. The meeting will ...
(Date:10/8/2015)... 2015  Trovagene, Inc., (NASDAQ:   TROV) a ... presentation of results from a field experience analysis ... SM (PCM) platform to accurately identify mutational ... determine appropriate therapy for patients. Mark Erlander ... delivering the results today in an oral presentation ...
(Date:10/8/2015)... 2015  Following months of investigation, Ross Feller Casey ... alleging that the anticoagulant Xarelto,s recommended dosage doesn,t work for ... Philadelphia on behalf of a ... the drug didn,t work as the manufacturer suggested. Ross ... shortly on behalf of clients from across the country with ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
... CLARA, Calif., Oct. 7, 2011 ProteinSimple today ... and field service support for its biologics products ... product lines are included in this expanded support ... Micro-Flow Imaging systems. The biologics market ...
... (Nasdaq: CPHD ) today announced that it will ... 30, 2011, on Thursday, October 20, 2011, after the close ... management presentation at 2 p.m. Pacific Time on Thursday, October ... webcast, please visit Cepheid,s website at at ...
Cached Medicine Technology:
The MACS VA_500 (variable atmosphere) is primarily for the study and isolation of microaerophilic organisms,including Campylobacter spp,Helicobacter pylori and other similarly fastdious organisms....
... an electrical power supply, MERKUR offers a broad ... a gas spring for ease of operation. For ... a foot pedal hydraulic system. Thanks to its ... anytime in a highly mobile and flexible manner. ...
... The operating table MARS Enduro ... examinations or interventions are required before, ... Due to the motorised longitudinal adjustment ... provides optimum working conditions in examination, ...
... Exclusive, 210° Top Rotation provides uncommon ... surgery. The Hercules 6700B eliminates any ... head-end procedures, while providing ample leg ... sit during procedures. Removable back and ...
Medicine Products: