Navigation Links
Experts Say CPR by Untrained Bystander a Good Idea
Date:12/21/2009

Study found little harm done even when collapsed person didn't need it

MONDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The risk that an untrained bystander can do harm by giving cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, to someone who collapses in public is almost vanishingly small, a new study indicates.

And so the dispatchers who send emergency medical help when 911 is called should routinely tell the caller to start CPR, said Dr. Thomas D. Rea, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Washington, and lead author of a report in the Dec. 21 online issue of Circulation.

"There have been concerns expressed by laypeople and dispatchers that doing CPR might cause damage," Rea said. "Our study shows that you can help the person at risk and the chances that you can injure someone who is not in cardiac arrest are very, very small, and those injuries are not serious."

Rea and his colleagues used data on 1,700 adults who received CPR in the King County emergency response system between June 2004 and January 2007. Rea is program medical director of the King County program. Of those, 55 percent were in cardiac arrest and 45 percent were not. Nearly half of those not in cardiac arrest received CPR from bystanders.

The data showed minor problems -- discomfort or injuries in 9 percent to 11 percent of cases -- but only four fractures, three due to chest compressions administered during CPR, one from repositioning the individual for CPR.

And while this study did not measure the benefits of giving CPR even when it eventually turned out to be unnecessary, "many studies have shown that the odds of surviving cardiac arrest increase by 20, 30, 100 percent, depending on what study you look at, when CPR is given," Rea said.

"The key finding here is that when a well-meaning member of the general public starts CPR and the victim is not in cardiac arrest, it will probably cause no injury at all," said Dr. Michael Sayre, an associate professor of emergency medicine at Ohio State University, and a spokesman for the American Heart Association. "The study reassures me that rescuers are rarely going to do any kind of injury."

King County emergency dispatchers use a basic two-question format to determine whether CPR should be started: Is the person conscious? Is the person breathing normally?

"If the answers are 'no,' the dispatcher tells the caller to 'get the victim on a hard surface, on his back, bare the chest, put the hands in the center of the chest right between the nipples and then start compressions of one to two inches, counting aloud,'" Rea said. The dispatcher counts along with the CPR giver, and the routine continues until the emergency response team arrives.

It can end sooner if the person getting CPR regains consciousness and tells the rescuer to stop.

King County is unusually well organized to handle cardiac emergencies, Sayre said. "My experience is that in many places, the 911 center is almost too polite," he said. "In communities like King County, call-takers are aggressive about telling callers how to do CPR."

There often is uncertainty at the caller's end of the telephone encounter, Sayre said. "I know there can be hesitation in terms of training and doing it in person. But this shows that evaluating the situation quickly and starting CPR will rarely do any harm."

More information

Advice on when and how to give CPR is available from the American Heart Association.



SOURCES: Thomas D. Rea, M.D., associate professor, medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, and program medical director, King County Medic One, EMS Division, Kent, Wash.; Michael Sayre, M.D., professor, emergency medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus; Dec. 21, 2009, Circulation, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Transplant infectious disease experts provide pandemic guidance
2. Leading Plastic Surgery Experts Available to Discuss Proposed Cosmetic Surgery Tax
3. 10 x 20: ID experts call for 10 new antibiotics by 2020
4. Experts Examine Possible Links Between Climate Change and Infectious Disease Transmission
5. Lung cancer experts hold roundtable on new staging guide
6. Experts Urge School Screening of Athletes Hearts
7. Conference of International Experts Calls for a Focus on Well-Being and The Person in Health
8. Prevention experts urge modification to 2009 H1N1 guidance for health care workers
9. U.S. and European Experts Applaud Creation of New Transatlantic Task Force on Global Antibiotic Resistance Threat
10. The Sports Bracing and Therapy Experts Re-Launch Website BetterBraces.com
11. Experts offer policy recommendations for improving medication adherence
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... January 17, 2017 , ... Gym Source, America’s leading retailer of premium ... South Dixie Hwy in Miami, FL. , “We are elated to be opening this ... in-store concept is designed to give clients a seamless and motivating shopping experience.” , ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... , ... For breast cancer clinicians and researchers who were unable to attend ... intimate review and analysis of its highlights, a novel half-day, complimentary meeting—the 14th Annual ... on February 4, 2017 in Chicago. Chaired by Kathy S. Albain, MD, FACP, FASCO ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... January 17, 2017 , ... ... improved supplement, Healthful-Flex. , The company, owned and operated by Ed Stroup, ... at a reasonable price with the highest level of customer service. Healthful Balance ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... ... Kevin Harrington (one of the original Sharks from mega-hit reality series Shark ... of Beauty and Personal Care. , Everyone makes New Year’s resolutions ... to these changes than beginning with personal care and beauty products? AsSeenOnTV.pro will be ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... January 17, 2017 , ... ... 21st century approach to infusing high speed technology into the fabric of an ... to the advancement of healthcare and wellness in a yet-to-be-named, health focused campus. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/17/2017)... Future published a Half Cooked Research Report on Endoscopy Devices Market. ... million during the period 2016 to 2022 from USD 28.7 million ... ... as a swiftly growing market and expected to grow at a ... various regions.  The increasing growth in endoscopy procedures is influencing the ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... 17, 2016  Attorney Advertising -- Bronstein, Gewirtz & Grossman, ... Anthera Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ("Anthera" or the "Company") (NASDAQ: ... and assist the investigation by visiting the firm,s site: ... certain of its officers and/or directors have violated Sections 10(b) ... ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... 17, 2017  In a letter to President-elect ... Jenkins outlines AARP,s priorities for Americans age 50 ... access to affordable health care coverage, and lowering the ... Jenkins writes to President-elect Trump that "Our nearly 38 ... on you to protect their Medicare and Social Security ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: