Navigation Links
Zebrafish reveal promising mechanism for healing spinal cord injury
Date:7/6/2012

BETHESDA, MD July 6, 2012 Yona Goldshmit, Ph.D., is a former physical therapist who worked in rehabilitation centers with spinal cord injury patients for many years before deciding to switch her focus to the underlying science.

"After a few years in the clinic, I realized that we don't really know what's going on," she said.

Now a scientist working with Peter Currie, Ph.D., at Monash University in Australia, Dr. Goldshmit is studying the mechanisms of spinal cord repair in zebrafish, which, unlike humans and other mammals, can regenerate their spinal cord following injury. On June 23 at the 2012 International Zebrafish Development and Genetics Conference in Madison, Wisconsin, she described a protein that may be a key difference between regeneration in fish and mammals.

One of the major barriers to spinal regeneration in mammals is a natural protective mechanism, which incongruously results in an unfortunate side effect. After a spinal injury, nervous system cells called glia are activated and flood the area to seal the wound to protect the brain and spinal cord. In doing so, however, the glia create scar tissue that acts as a physical and chemical barrier, which prevents new nerves from growing through the injury site.

One striking difference between the glial cells in mammals and fish is the resulting shape: mammalian glia take on highly branched, star-like arrangements that appear to intertwine into dense tissue. Fish glia cells, by contrast, adopt a simple elongated shape called bipolar morphology that bridges the injury site and appears to help new nerve cells grow through the damaged area to heal the spinal cord.

"Zebrafish don't have so much inflammation and the injury is not so severe as in mammals, so we can actually see the pro-regenerative effects that can happen," Dr. Goldshmit explained.

Studies in mice have found that mammalian glia can take up the same elongated shape, but in response to the environment around the injury they instead mature into scar tissue that does not allow nerve regrowth.

Dr. Goldshmit and her colleagues have focused on a family of molecules called fibroblast growth factors (Fgf), which have shown some evidence of improving recovery in mice and humans with spinal cord damage. The Monash University group found that Fgf activity around the damage site promotes the bipolar glial shape and encourages nerve regeneration in zebrafish.

Preliminary results in mice show that Fgf injections near a spinal injury increase both the number of glia cells at the site and the elongated morphology. Their evidence suggests that Fgfs may work to create an environment more supportive of regeneration in mammals as well and could be a valuable therapeutic target.

Spinal injury patients usually have few options, Dr. Goldshmit emphasized, and development of new, biologically-based approaches will be critical.

"This is a nice example of how we can use the zebrafish model," she said. "When we learn from the zebrafish what to look at, we can find things that give us hope for finding therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury in humans."


'/>"/>

Contact: Phyllis Edelman
pedelman@genetics-gsa.org
301-634-7302
Genetics Society of America
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Novel compound demonstrates anti-leukemic effect in zebrafish, shows promise for human treatment
2. Study reveals how cancer drug causes diabetic-like state
3. New Method to Reveal Alzheimers Marker Shows Promise
4. Study reveals major funding shortfall and high death rates for emergency laparotomy
5. Biomarkers can reveal IBS
6. A closer look at PARP-1 reveals potential new drug targets
7. Novel biomarkers reveal evidence of radiation exposure
8. Fruit flies reveal mechanism behind ALS-like disease
9. The Tennessee Car Accident Lawyers at Michael D. Ponce & Associates Alert Public of CDC Survey Revealing Majority of High School Seniors Admitting to Texting Behind Wheel
10. Researchers reveal crucial immune fighter role of the STING protein
11. Weirdest hCG Questions Revealed
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/27/2017)... ... February 27, 2017 , ... ... is proud to announce a new informational post on robotic hair transplantation. San ... Extraction (FUE) hair transplant and Follicular Unit Transplantation (FUT) can sound similar. Either ...
(Date:2/26/2017)... Como, Italy (PRWEB) , ... February 26, 2017 ... ... its last call for entries to the 7th Edition of International Social Design ... by Social Design Professionals, Product Designers, System Designers, Governments and Institutions worldwide with ...
(Date:2/26/2017)... PA (PRWEB) , ... February 26, 2017 , ... ... and services with Pay-For-Performance B2B Marketing. B2B Sellers will now only pay for B.A.N.T. ... Robert Hennessey, the founder of IndustryArchive.Org, said, “Given the new reality that B2B buyers ...
(Date:2/26/2017)... ... February 26, 2017 , ... Occupational pesticide exposure is ... specific LRRK2 mutation, according to a study released today at the 1st Pan ... a link between pesticides and incidence of sporadic PD through occupational exposure. This ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... Only two months after the official release ... show in Cannes (France), XO Private has initiated a second print-run of its lavish ... almost a metre across when open, weighs in at more than six kilos, retails ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/27/2017)... Period October – December 2016 ... to SEK -16.4 (-6.4) million Result after tax amounted to ... after dilution Cash flow from operating activities amounted to SEK ... Period full ... Operating result amounted to SEK -39.5 (-29.5) million ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... Mass. , Feb. 24, 2017  Today, ... US dental labs have a new path to ... using the Biodenta implant library integrated into exocad ... must implement FDA compliant Good Manufacturing Processes (GMP,s) ... manufacturer with Biodenta, and complete an audit process. Then, ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition ... Industry Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. ... The Global Wireless Health ... over the next decade to reach approximately $330.5 billion by 2025. ... for all the given segments on global as well as regional ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: