Navigation Links
York U study pinpoints part of brain that suppresses instinct
Date:12/22/2010

TORONTO, December 22, 2010 − Research from York University is revealing which regions in the brain "fire up" when we suppress an automatic behaviour such as the urge to look at other people as we enter an elevator.

A York study, published recently in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, used fMRI (functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging) to track brain activity when study participants looked at an image of a facial expression with a word superimposed on it. Study participants processed the words faster than the facial expressions. However, when the word did not match the image for example, when the word "sad" was superimposed on an image of someone smiling − participants reacted less quickly to a request to read the word.

"The emotion in the word doesn't match the emotion in the facial expression, which creates a conflict," said Joseph DeSouza, assistant professor of psychology in York's Faculty of Health. "Our study showed − for the first time − an increase in signal from the left inferior frontal cortex when the study participant was confronted by this conflict between the word and the image and asked to respond to directions that went against their automatic instincts."

Previous research on the prefrontal cortex has found this region to be implicated in higher order cognitive functions including longterm planning, response suppression and response selection. This experiment, conducted by graduate student Shima Ovaysikia under DeSouza's supervision, allowed researchers to study inhibitory mechanisms for much more complex stimuli than have been studied in the past.

The inferior frontal cortex is located near the front left temple. People who have problems with inhibition, including stroke or schizophrenia patients, may have damage to this inferior frontal cortex zone, says DeSouza. As a result, when they see something that is inconsistent such as the image of a smiling face with the word "sad" across it they would be expected to take more time to react, because the part of their brains needed to process it has been damaged or destroyed.


'/>"/>

Contact: Janice Walls
wallsj@yorku.ca
416-736-2100
York University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Despite Treatment, Employees with Depression Generate Higher Absentee Costs, According to Thomson Reuters Study
2. American Council on Exercise (ACE) Study Reveals Kettlebells Provide Powerful Workout in Short Amount of Time
3. TV drama can be more persuasive than news program, study finds
4. Study carried out into biological risks of eating reptiles
5. Neuroimaging study may pave way for effective Alzheimers treatments
6. Study finds racial gaps continue in heart disease awareness
7. Luth Researchs IndicatorEDG(TM) Study Finds Americans Hopes of Achieving Their Dreams Are Fading
8. First blinded study of venous insufficiency prevalence in MS shows promising results
9. Soothing infants with food focus of childhood obesity study
10. People with anxiety disorder less able to regulate response to negative emotions, study shows
11. American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report: Study Finds Racial Gaps Continue in Heart Disease Awareness, Low Knowledge of Heart Attack Warning Signs Among Women
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/26/2017)... ... 26, 2017 , ... IndustryArchive.Org . is announcing a new way for ... will now only pay for B.A.N.T. quality sales leads based on the Sellers decision ... the new reality that B2B buyers are controlling the sales process via the Internet ...
(Date:2/26/2017)... ... February 26, 2017 , ... Functional imaging data supports ... a study released today at the 1st Pan American Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders ... be effective in improving cognitive function in PD patients. This study, led by ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... HealthPostures, expert ... Core benefits and advantages built into the home office sit stand solution are ... feel. Ability to gain the benefits embedded in the TaskMate Go are available ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... WHAT: , ... and recognition opportunities as well as advocacy for the state and region‘s technology ... February 23. The Council's Innovation Forecast event highlights innovation throughout the region ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... February 24, 2017 , ... The Smart ... unemployment—researchers from Oxford University predict that 47 percent of all jobs in the United ... redefining “smart” and “successful.” The day of the aggressive know-it-all who steamrolls over colleagues ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/27/2017)... October – December 2016 Revenues amounted to SEK 0.3 ... Result after tax amounted to SEK -16.3 (-6.5) million, corresponding ... Cash flow from operating activities amounted to SEK -8.3 (-7.3) million ... Period full year 2016 ... amounted to SEK -39.5 (-29.5) million Result after tax amounted ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... Ind. , Feb. 24, 2017 Zimmer ... leader in musculoskeletal healthcare, will present at the Cowen ... at the Boston Marriott Copley Place on Tuesday, March ... A live webcast of the presentation can be ... archived for replay following the conference via Zimmer Biomet,s ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... 24, 2017  In conjunction with DURECT Corporation,s (Nasdaq: ... press release, you are invited to listen to a ... internet on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at 4:30 pm ... live audio webcast of the presentation will be available ... clicking "Investor Relations."  If you are unable to participate ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: