Navigation Links
York U study finds better way to battle mosquitoes
Date:6/28/2010

TORONTO, June 28, 2010 − Protecting ourselves from backyard mosquito bites may come down to leaving the vacuuming for later, a study from York University shows.

Rather than vacuuming the grass clippings out of catch basins before adding treatments to control mosquitoes, municipalities should leave the organic waste in place, the research found.

"Catch basins are a permanent source of mosquitoes on every street. By putting S-methoprene in cleaned catch basins we saw an average of 20 per cent of the mosquito larvae make it to the adult stage over the duration of the study. But that number was reduced to less than 3 per cent just by leaving the organic debris in the catch basins until the fall, when mosquito season is over," says Norman Yan, a professor in York University's Department of Biology.

Yan and former York master's student Stacey Baker co-authored a study published in the current issue of the Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. They were surprised by the results of the research, conducted by Baker in 2005 on residential streets in the Greater Toronto Area.

"We predicted that S-methoprene would work better in the catch basins that had been cleaned. We found the opposite that S-methoprene binds to organic material, which holds it in the catch basins longer so that mosquito larvae are exposed to it for longer," says Baker.

The research may have implications not only for our comfort levels, but for disease control, says Yan. The human West Nile Virus rate and the number of positive mosquito pools have been lower in the past two years in Ontario, but it remains a problem in some areas of the United States, and warmer temperatures and a wet season could increase the risk in Ontario. The West Nile Virus is not carried by all mosquitoes but it can lead to severe symptoms and even death.

Public health units in Ontario determine if and when they will larvicide based on their surveillance of the level of risk. S-methoprene, which is used in Canada only for control of West Nile Virus, is still being used in hundreds of thousands of catch basins in the GTA, but there has been no thought given to the cleaning schedule, according to the authors. The study demonstrates that scheduling both the application of S-methoprene and the removal of debris makes sense, they said, and it may be worthwhile to clean the catch basins every two years instead of annually.

"Accumulated Organic Debris in Catch Basins Improves the Efficacy of S-methoprene against Mosquitoes in Toronto, Ontario, Canada" appears in the Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. York University's Knowledge Mobilization Unit, which seeks to maximize the impact of academic research on public policy and professional practice, has sent a summary of the research findings to Ontario's public health units.


'/>"/>

Contact: Janice Walls
wallsj@yorku.ca
416-736-2100 x22101
York University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Casual Sex Doesnt Cause Emotional Damage: Study
2. Study Finds Possible Explanation for the Link Between Infertility and Breast/Ovarian Cancer Risks
3. Screening for Spinal Muscular Atrophy Not Cost-Effective: Study
4. New study finds possible source of beta cell destruction that leads to Type 1 diabetes
5. New Study Demonstrates Novel Use of Metabolic Imaging to Locate Sperm in Infertile Men -- Non-Invasive Imaging Procedure May Replace Invasive Techniques such as Testicula
6. Risk of stroke lower for recent Ontario immigrants: study
7. Definitive study confirms chemo benefit in postmenopausal breast cancer
8. Experimental stem cell treatment arrests acute lung injury in mice, study shows
9. Violence is part of the job say nurses as study shows only 1 in 6 incidents are reported
10. Controversial Autism Study Retracted by Medical Journal
11. Study Reveals Impact Of Health Insurance On Hispanics' Attitudes Towards Healthcare Providers
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/16/2017)... ... 2017 , ... One thing common to all types of cancer is that ... well. The money spent screening for and treating cancer in the United States is ... cancer more than in any other country that has an advanced healthcare system, sometimes ...
(Date:1/15/2017)... ... January 15, 2017 , ... Going above and beyond the ... to better communities around the world by offering the Gensuite team and their ... for team members to become involved in a cause that is bigger than ...
(Date:1/15/2017)... IL (PRWEB) , ... January 14, 2017 , ... Wondering ... Lobster Gram Dinner delivered straight to your door for a romantic, lobster feast in ... just in time for Valentine's Day. The dinners will be featured until February ...
(Date:1/14/2017)... ... January 14, 2017 , ... AgileMinder develops innovative products and services ... Scale is now available on Apple as a fun, free emoji sticker pack for ... one of the ten color coded values on The Emoji Scale. , On ...
(Date:1/13/2017)... ... 2017 , ... KOAMTAC ®, Inc., a leading manufacturer of Bluetooth barcode ... scanner and data collector at the National Retail Federation’s Big Show (NRF17) held January ... to the market’s need for more compact and rugged devices for collecting barcode data ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/13/2017)... YORK , Jan. 12, 2017  Rosen Law ... filing of a class action lawsuit on behalf of ... ALXN ) from February 10, 2014 through November 9, ... recover damages for Alexion investors under the federal securities ... go to http://rosenlegal.com/cases-991.html or call Phillip ...
(Date:1/13/2017)... JAKARTA , Jan. 13, 2017 Over the last 10 ... been developing rapidly (6% – 10% yoy) and are expected to deliver ... in the region, followed by Thailand , ... , and Singapore .  A member of the ... represents almost 40% of the SEA,s economic output and the largest ...
(Date:1/13/2017)... 2017 ... Research and Markets has announced the addition ... to their offering. The disease is divided into ... are early-stage melanoma, which can be treated with surgery, and advanced ... with early-stage therapy aiming to prevent disease re-occurrence, and advanced therapies ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: