Navigation Links
Workers Fear Stigma of Seeking Mental Health Care
Date:1/30/2010

Employers urged to do more to remove barriers to treatment

SATURDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Fears about losing status at work and about confidentiality are among the main reasons that many American workers are more hesitant to seek treatment for mental health issues than for physical health problems, according to a national survey released this week by the American Psychiatric Association.

More than 40 percent of the 1,129 respondents said their employer was supportive or extremely supportive of their workers seeking care for health concerns. However, the online survey also found that barriers persist for workers who said their workplace is unsupportive of employees seeking treatment, especially for mental health concerns.

Among employees, 76 percent believed their work status would be damaged by seeking treatment for drug addiction, 73 percent for alcoholism, and 62 percent for depression, compared with 55 percent who thought seeking care for diabetes would affect their work status and 54 percent for heart disease.

"It is important to support an environment that encourages employees taking care of their physical and mental health," Dr. Alan Axelson, chairman of the association's Partnership for Workplace Mental Health Advisory Council, said in an association news release. "Research supports the fact that when people receive needed care, they are healthier and more productive -- and employers realize the return on their health care investment."

The partnership offers the suggestions for employers:

  • Supervisors and managers should lead by example by taking care of their physical and mental health.
  • Workplaces should promote prevention, early intervention and wellness programs. This includes holding health fairs, providing healthy meals and snacks at meetings, encouraging exercise and promoting a balance between work and the rest of an employee's life.
  • Employees should be discouraged from coming to work if they're ill.
  • Workers should be reminded of health benefits and available programs, and efforts should be taken to make sure they know how to access care.
  • Employees should be reassured about confidentiality, especially those seeking mental health treatment.

More information

Mental Health America has more about mental illness and stigma.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Psychiatric Association, news release, Jan. 25, 2010


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Kaiser Workers Vote to Join NUHW, Reject SEIU in Three Elections
2. 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East Donates $1 Million to UNICEF for Haiti Earthquake Emergency Relief
3. InsureMyTrip.com and HCC Medical Insurance Services Join Forces to Protect Haiti-Bound Relief Workers
4. Health Reform Tax Changes: Good Progress for Workers; Union to Keep Working for Better Bill
5. Adoodle Donates NOXO Odor Inhibitor Product to Operation USA to Aid Rescue Workers in Haiti
6. Shebell & Shebell Prevails in "Hostile Work Environment" Workers' Comp Case Affirmed by Appellate Division of Superior Court of New Jersey
7. Consumer Watchdog Releases Coercive Lobbying E-Mail to Employees of United Health Group, Calls It Political Harassment of Workers
8. Workforce Alliance Earns Grant to Train Health Care Workers
9. Philadelphia Red Cross Blood Workers Strike to Protect Donor and Blood Safety
10. Labor Board OKs 2,300 Kaiser Professionals to Quit SEIU and Join National Union of Healthcare Workers
11. Labor Board Decision Puts Kaiser Workers Pay, Healthcare, Pensions in Jeopardy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... Worth, TX (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 ... ... financial planning agency serving communities in the greater Dallas, Miami, and Raleigh regions, ... young boy fighting to overcome a rare and deadly chromosome abnormality. , After ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... IL (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... which established the certification process to promote standards of excellence for the field ... Symposium, scheduled for March 22 – 25, 2018 in Orlando, Florida at the ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... LUIS OBISPO, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... Alzheimer’s or dementia. However, many long-term care insurance companies have a waiver for care ... is the 90-day elimination period, when the family pays for care, is often waived, ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... viewers the lowdown on sciatica in a new episode of "Success Files," which ... current events and innovation and investigates each subject in-depth with passion and integrity. ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... CitiDent ... sleep apnea using cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. As many as 18 million ... by frequent cessation in breathing. Oral appliances can offer significant relief to about ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... Texas , Oct. 11, 2017  True ... services, has amplified its effort during National Breast ... about hereditary cancer risks. ... of Clinical Oncology calculated that more than 10 ... have inherited mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and have ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... , Oct. 10, 2017   West Pharmaceutical Services, ... solutions for injectable drug administration, today shared the results ... Adapter for improving the intradermal administration of polio vaccines. ... Vaccination Summit in May 2017 by Dr. Ondrej ... Department, World Health Organization (WHO), and recently published in ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... , Oct. 4, 2017  South Korean-based healthcare product ... training aide "cprCUBE" on Kickstarter. The device will educate ... cardiac arrests with better efficiency compared to the dated ... real-time feedback on efficacy of the compression for a ... has a goal to raise $5,000. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: