Navigation Links
Work Time Predicts Sleep Time
Date:9/3/2007

Commuting to job also determines slumber hours, study says

MONDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) --The more hours adults work and the more hours they spend commuting to the job, the less time they spend sleeping.

That's the finding of new research that shows the impact of work on slumber.

Adults who sleep four-and-a-half hours or fewer worked an average of 93 minutes more on weekdays and 118 minutes more on weekends than the average sleeper, a University of Pennsylvania research team found. People sleeping 11-and-a-half hours or more worked an average of 143 minutes less on weekdays and 71 minutes less on weekends, they said.

Experts recommend that adults sleep between seven and eight hours a night.

"These cross-sectional results in a nationally representative sample suggest that compensated work time is the most potent determinant of sleep time, in which case work time should be considered an important factor when evaluating the relationship between sleep time and morbidity and mortality," lead researcher Dr. Mathias Basner said in a prepared statement.

In their study, published in the September issue of Sleep, the researchers gathered data from 47,731 respondents to the American Time Use Survey conducted in 2003, 2004 and 2005. The 15-minute telephone survey asks people how they spent their time between 4 a.m. the previous day and 4 a.m. on the day of the interview, including where they were and who they were with.

Results showed that the more daytime activities a person reported, the less he or she would spend sleeping. Time at work had the strongest effect on hours of sleep, the team reported.

The researchers said that the impact of travel time on sleep was unexpected and required further research to understand how people manage commute and sleep time, as well as other kinds of travel time for errands, socializing, worship and leisure activities.

Short sleep times were also related to time spent socializing, relaxing and participating in leisure activities on the weekends. People who slept less were spending more time in education, household activities and, for people with very little sleep, TV watching.

For most people, the researchers reported that increased TV time correlated with increased sleep time. All other activities decreased in time as sleep time increased.

On weekends, people with less sleep time also spent less time watching TV than average sleepers, while people with long sleep times spent less time socializing, relaxing and participating in leisure activities.

Age also affects sleep time, the researchers said, who noted longer average sleep times at both the older and the younger ends of the age spectrum. People between 45 and 54 years old were most likely to be working more and sleeping less.

More information

To learn more about getting a good night's sleep, visit Insomnia: How to Get a Good Night's Sleep.



-- Madeline Vann



SOURCE: American Academy of Sleep Medicine, news release, Sept. 1, 2007


'/>"/>
Copyright©2007 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Restricted Activity Predicts Disability
2. Fitness Level Predicts Stroke
3. Atrial fibrillation predicts for acute ischaemic stroke
4. Weight and size at birth predicts mortality in adulthood
5. PSA Can Predicts The Treatment Response In Advanced Prostate Cancer
6. Being Teased Predicts Poor Psychological Functioning in Youth With Cleft Lip
7. Model Predicts Colon Cancer Inheritable Genetic Defects
8. Formula Predicts Osteoporotic Fracture Risk
9. Computer Tool Predicts Effectiveness Of Microbicides
10. New Genetic Test Predicts Eye-Cancer Patients Futures
11. Technology Predicts Outcome of Child Heart Surgery
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... ... 50% lower incidence rate of type 2 diabetes in the GrassrootsHealth cohort with ... time to make a change in public health,” states Carole Baggerly, Director of ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... Las Vegas, NV (PRWEB) , ... February 08, 2016 , ... ... transformation on February 9th, 10th and 11th, 2016 in honor of his birthday on ... relationships and true happiness. Mahendra Trivedi is known by over 250,000 people from ...
(Date:2/7/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 07, 2016 , ... Women's Excellence ... National Wear Red Day. National Wear Red Day is the first Friday each ... Heart disease and stroke cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year – ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... February 06, 2016 , ... US Sports Camps is proud ... . This event brings together top non-profit leaders, ultimate organizations, and coaches from around ... Valerio Iani, Bay Area Disc Program Director of Youth and Education, describes this year ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Steven Tonkinson, 36, of Coconut Grove, Florida, ran the Miami ... in 2003. This year, he ran all 26.2 miles with a green 25-pound ShelterBox ... Miami Heat. , This Sunday, while many are watching the Superbowl, Steven Tonkinson will ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... HOUSTON , 8. Februar 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... veröffentlichte heute eine Infografik mit dem Titel ... ganzen Welt), mit der der Krankheit gegenüber ... die dazu ermutigen soll, Medikamentenresistenz bei Epilepsie ... der allgemeinen Diskussion zu machen. Mithilfe der ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... Feb. 5, 2016  ivWatch, a medical devices company, is ... Award granted by Governor Terry McAuliffe,s office. ivWatch ... February 25th at an event to be held at the ... award honors professionals and business that have made significant contributions ... Logo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160205/330117LOGO ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... -- Aethlon Medical, Inc. (Nasdaq: AEMD ), today announced ... presenting at Source Capital Group,s 2016 Disruptive Growth & Healthcare ... 2:15 p.m. ET on Wednesday, February 10, 2016.  Mr. Joyce ... at 3:15 p.m. ET. http://www.aethlonmedical.com .  The webcast ... conclusion of the live event. The panel discussion will not ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: