Navigation Links
Women's race and class impact contraception recommendations, UCSF study shows
Date:10/8/2010

A woman's race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status impact whether health care providers recommend one of the most highly effective forms of contraception, a UCSF study confirms. The results also indicate that the interaction of both factors plays a role in clinicians' decisions.

Recommendations by health care providers previously have been found to vary by patients' race and socioeconomic status, contributing to health disparities, according to the researchers. The team investigated the effect of these factors on recommendations for contraception.

Study results appear in the October print edition of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and are available online at http://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378(10)00578-8/fulltext. An editorial commenting on the study also is included in the Journal.

In the study, clinicians' recommendations for intrauterine devices (IUDs), considered among the most effective forms of contraception, were affected by both the patient's class and her race/ethnicity.

  • Clinicians were less likely to recommend IUDs to white women of low socioeconomic status than to white women of high socioeconomic status.
  • Socioeconomic status had no significant effect on recommendations for IUDs for Latinas and black women.
  • But when the researchers evaluated the groups by race/ethnicity, clinicians were more likely to recommend IUDs to Latinas and black women of low socioeconomic status than to white women of low socioeconomic status.

"Understandably, people want simple answers but the complexity of the results is not surprising. We live in a complex world where race and class are intertwined, " said Christine Dehlendorf, MD, MAS, assistant professor in the UCSF Department of Family and Community Medicine and the UCSF Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences. "Clinicians need to be cognizant of how their patients' characteristics may influence the care they provide."

In the study, one of 18 videos depicting patients with varying socioeconomic and racial characteristics was shown to 524 healthcare providers, who then were asked whether they would recommend an IUD to the patient. The study group was drawn from medical physicians, osteopathic physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants who attended meetings of professional societies of family medicine and gynecology.

Previous research on the effect of patient race/ethnicity and class on clinicians' behaviors has focused on patient-provider interactions involving medical decisions about diseases, such as coronary artery disease, for which there is general consensus about appropriate treatments. Decisions about family planning, in contrast, involve multiple clinically appropriate options. The most effective choice may depend on a patient's personal preference, the team states.

"Providing contraceptive services is a particularly sensitive area of health care, both because of the intimate nature of the discussion of sexual behavior and because of the historical relationship of efforts to promote contraception with attempts to limit the fertility of minority and poor women in the United States," Dehlendorf said. "Family planning providers should work to ensure that they provide quality, patient-centered care to all women."

The inconsistency in health care provider recommendations for such an effective contraception method suggests a need for further research into the influence of clinicians' recommendations on family planning and ways to prevent the differences in care, she said.

The IUD, a small, plastic device that is inserted and left inside the uterus to prevent pregnancy, is more effective than most other forms of birth control, according to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

"This is an especially important area of research given the high rate of unintended pregnancy in the US. It is critical that we provide comprehensive contraceptive counseling and equitable access to highly effective long-acting reversible contraceptives such as the IUD to all women," said Jody Steinauer, MD, MAS, senior study author and associate professor in the UCSF Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences.


'/>"/>

Contact: Karin Rush-Monroe
karin.rush-monroe@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California -- San Francisco
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Last-minute Valentines Day Idea: Free E-Book of Classic Chocolate Available for Download from SBI Publishing
2. New SeaColonyTennis.net Launches to Promote World-Class Tennis Programs at Sea Colony
3. MarquisNet Co-Location Agreement with MessageBroadcast Helps Message Delivery Provider Expand World-Class Network
4. The Classic Shave Company Announces the Opening of Beverly Hills Shop
5. Golf Fore Brain Cancer Research at the Barry Spiegelman Memorial Golf Classic
6. Intellimed and Analytix On Demand™ Partner To Deliver World Class Quality and Performance Management Solutions to the Healthcare Industry
7. Earth Class Mail™ Introduces Miami and Chicago Street Addresses
8. Good Vibrations' Pleasure-Ed Series Brings High Quality Erotic Education to the Classroom and the Bedroom
9. Transcendent One, Inc. Sponsors 18th Annual Fresh Start for Kids Celebrity Golf Classic
10. Classic Residence by Hyatt at Teaneck Opens Licensed Assisted Living Center
11. Bad Habits Explain Class Differences in Health: Study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Bellus Medical, a leader in medical aesthetics, ... of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP). PRP systems are used by physicians in areas ... and provide a faster and more efficient healing process. There are many systems ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... 22, 2017 , ... Forty-five percent of American respondents feel ... members or friends have also commented about their poor hearing. However, only 13 ... One reason, suggested by 89 percent of American respondents, is that they don’t ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... Isle, North Carolina (PRWEB) , ... February 22, 2017 , ... ... 59% of cats and 54% of dogs, according to the Association for Pet Obesity ... professionals disagreed on key pet food issues such as the benefits of corn and ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... ... BrightStar Care Charleston , a home care and medical staffing agency, will ... on Aging’s Senior Expo on Thursday, March 23, 2017, at the Omar Convention ... our community. We are thrilled to participate in this event because we believe it ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... Alto-Shaam is pleased to announce ... Oven offers up to four ovens in one. Control temperature, fan speed and ... evenness in cooking. Alto-Shaam has partnered with Appliance Innovation to introduce this game-changing ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/22/2017)... 22, 2017  Soligenix, Inc. (Nasdaq: ... biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing products ... unmet medical need, announced today that its proprietary ... European patent for the treatment of psoriasis. The ... treatment of skin conditions, complements the method of ...
(Date:2/21/2017)... NEW YORK , Feb. 21, 2017 ... at a CAGR of 6.0% from 2016 to 2021, ... 8.12 billion in 2016. Increasing prevalence of chronic diseases ... infusion pumps to reduce hospital expenditure, steady increase in ... in pain management are some of the key factors ...
(Date:2/21/2017)... YORK , Feb. 21, 2017 Diabetic Shoes ... ... Diabetes can be described as a disease, which is marked ... insulin production and insulin action. The disease has become a ... premature death. Diabetes affects several organs of the body including ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: