Navigation Links
Women's Death Rate Higher From Severe Heart Attack
Date:12/8/2008

Undertreatment at the hospital may be a contributing cause, study suggests

MONDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Women who suffer the most severe form of heart attack are twice as likely as men to die in the hospital, a new study finds.

The study of more than 78,000 people treated for heart attacks at 420 U.S. hospitals between 2001 and 2006 found the same overall in-hospital death rate for men and women.

But 10.2 percent of women with a STEMI heart attack died, compared to 5.5 percent of men with the same diagnosis, said the report in the Dec. 9 issue of the journal Circulation.

"We believe that a part of it may be related to the fact that women are undertreated," said study lead author Dr. Hani Jneid, an assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. "There is evidence across the board of undertreatment."

"We obviously could not assess the appropriateness of the treatments," Jneid added. "But the results point to the fact that there might be some sex-related disparity in treatment that needs to be addressed by physicians."

STEMI is short for ST-elevation myocardial infarction, a name derived from the heartbeat pattern seen on an electrocardiogram. A STEMI heart attack usually is caused by complete blockage of a coronary artery, which means that more heart muscle dies than if there is only partial blockage.

While in theory "there is no intrinsic reason why there should be a difference" in survival rates between the sexes, there are several possible explanations, said Dr. Gregg C. Fonarow, a professor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, and an author of the report. Those explanations may start with the symptoms reported by people having heart attacks and then go on to the treatment they receive, he said.

"Women when presenting with a heart attack tend to be older and have other comorbid conditions [health problems]," Fonarow said. "But even when we adjusted for that, we found a 12 percent difference."

Also, "women present more atypically," he said. "They are less likely to have sternal chest pain or pressure, just general symptoms like shortness of breath or other symptoms that are non-specific."

But there clearly was a difference in the treatment given men and women, the study found. Women were 14 percent less likely to receive early aspirin, 10 percent less likely to be given beta blocker drugs, 25 percent less likely to receive reperfusion therapy to restore blood flow, and 13 percent less likely to have artery-opening angioplasty within 90 minutes of arrival at the hospital.

The American Heart Association has started a program called "Mission: Lifeline" that's designed to educate people about the symptoms of a heart attack so they can seek treatment quickly and also "enable hospitals to make quicker diagnoses," Fonarow said. "These kinds of quality-improvement programs can lead physicians, emergency room attendants and paramedics to close the gap and eventually eliminate sex-related differences."

Some basic biological differences between the sexes might be partially responsible for the discrepancy in survival, said Dr. Laura Wexler, senior associate dean at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and another author of the report.

"For women ages 50 to 60, I wonder whether the biology of a heart attack may be different," she said. "The question is whether menopause enhances the severity of heart attacks."

The incidence of heart attack in such perimenopausal women is lower, Wexler said, "but when they do get it, the mortality rate is higher."

Still, Wexler said, "I think there are impediments to the diagnosis of coronary disease in women, including, but not exclusively, some lack of appreciation in some sectors of the importance of coronary disease in women."

More information

For descriptions about the various kinds of heart attacks and what should be done about them, visit the American Heart Association.



SOURCES: Hani Jneid, M.D., assistant professor, cardiovascular medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston; Gregg C. Fonarow, M.D., professor, cardiovascular medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine; Laura Wexler, M.D., senior associate dean, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine; Dec. 9, 2008, Circulation


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Womenshealthchannel Enhancements Support Pregnant Teens
2. Penn study finds pro-death proteins required to regulate healthy immune function
3. Study, meta-analysis examine factors associated with death from heatstroke
4. Antioxidants show no clear benefit against cardiovascular events, death in high-risk women
5. Diabetes appears to increase risk of death for patients with acute coronary syndromes
6. Diet high in meat, fat and refined grains linked to risk for colon cancer recurrence, death
7. Longer ambulance journeys boost death risk for seriously ill patients
8. Stopping Statins After Stroke Doubles Death Risk
9. Oral Health a Matter of Life and Death for Seniors
10. Pop stars more than twice as likely to die an early death
11. Australian-led international study shows blood pressure drugs cut death rate in type 2 diabetes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... A national ... Congress and Expo event March 9-11, 2016. Hosted by Ohio's Bureau of Worker's ... , As the longest running and largest worker's compensation event in Ohio, organizers ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... UNF Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32224, February 26th: Amateur & Professional Divisions - ... - Time: 7:00pm – 10:00pm | Ticket Prices $30, Social Media: ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... Anxiety of older Americans over ... of Medicare Part D a decade ago, according to The Senior Citizens League ... on how they are coping with rapidly rising costs. “The implications are chilling, ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 09, 2016 , ... According to ... witnessing a dramatic increase in the number of patients under the age of 30. ... they are seeing in their offices, and may indicate an overall shift in the ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... Las Vegas, Nevada (PRWEB) , ... February 09, ... ... is now providing treatment to Medicaid beneficiaries who are diagnosed with autism spectrum ... state of Nevada. Autism treatment using applied behavior analysis (ABA) is key ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... 2016  Astellas Pharma Inc. (TSE: 4503, President and ... it has successfully completed, through its indirect wholly-owned subsidiary ... all issued and outstanding shares of common stock of ... Paul Wotton , "Ocata") for a price of US$8.50 ... Offer"). Astellas commenced the Tender Offer on November 19, ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Tenn. , Feb. 10, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... of Nursing received an in-kind gift ... of a VeinViewer® Vision vein finder for ... will help students as they learn how ... combining technology with traditional technique. ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. , Feb. 10, ... result of a synergistic confluence of various ... unique value propositions, previously unavailable. These opportunities ... convergence and convergence, in turn, drives the ... Today,s entrepreneurial scenario is characterized by technology ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: