Navigation Links
Women Feel More Guilt, Distress About Work Intrusions at Home, Study Says
Date:3/9/2011

By Maureen Salamon
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- The eroding boundary between work and family life, fueled by constant availability via cell phone or e-mail, takes a greater emotional toll on women, a new study finds.

Researchers from the University of Toronto used data from more than 1,000 American workers to determine gender differences in how men and women respond emotionally and psychologically to increasing work-related contact outside of normal business hours.

Men were significantly less distressed than women by frequent work-related contact via phone, e-mail or text, according to the study, published in the March issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Study co-author Scott Schieman, a professor of sociology at the University of Toronto, said men and women may perceive the work-family balance differently because of lingering perceptions of gender roles.

"There may be some residual effect of gender roles, but that's purely speculative," Schieman said. "I think one of the main things [to focus on] was how men's level of guilt seemed to be the same at all levels of work contact...whereas women's levels seemed to rise in a significant way."

The study also noted that although men have taken on more responsibility at home over the past few decades, "women continue to do the majority of domestic work and are still considered the primary source of child care in the family."

In the study, men and women were asked how often co-workers, supervisors, managers, customers or clients contacted them about work-related matters outside of normal business hours.

Work-family conflict was assessed by asking participants how often their jobs left a lack of time, energy and focus on their families. Guilt levels were measured by asking participants the direct question, "In the past seven days, on how many days have you felt guilty?" Psychological distress was gauged by asking the number of days they felt tired, run down or unfocused.

Individuals of both genders reported higher levels of guilt being contacted at home when they had young children or when they had previously been married. But overall, regardless of children's age or marital status, women reported both more guilt and distress over work intrusions into the home.

"Initially, we thought women were more distressed by frequent work contact because it interfered with their family responsibilities more so than men," study author Paul Glavin, a doctoral student at the University of Toronto, said in a statement. "However, this wasn't the case. We found that women are able to juggle their work and family lives just as well as men, but they feel more guilty as a result of being contacted. This guilt seems to be at the heart of their distress."

Schieman said the study builds upon research in the 1990s that tested similar patterns in a national sample of working women and men.

"It's affirming the way our findings mapped into a much richer, qualitative in-depth study so many years ago," he said. But, he noted, "overall, the levels of guilt and distress tend to be low in the population. People are not running around riddled with guilt."

Noelle Chesley, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, said the findings tap into the idea "that women's experiences of leisure time are very different from men's. Work intruding into home life is having really different consequences for men and women."

"Women and men bring different things to the table in terms of home interactions," Chesley added. "Women's free time is more interrupted. I could see how, if you're feeling constantly interrupted...how all of this together could produce a very different psychological response."

What can be done to mitigate the intrusion of work into home life amidst the barrage of technology that facilitates it? Not much, Schieman and Chesley said.

"I think technology...is in some ways beyond our control, especially regarding work use," Chesley said. "Those are things people don't have as much discretion with, especially in the precarious economic times we're in."

"There's no stopping it," agreed Schieman. "I think to some extent, we've lost that [battle]."

More information

The Family and Work Institute has more information about work-family balance.

SOURCES: Scott Schieman, Ph.D., professor, sociology, University of Toronto; Noelle Chesley, Ph.D., assistant professor, sociology, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; March 2011 Journal of Health and Social Behavior


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Company Invites Women to STOP PMS - Take the 10-Minute Challenge
2. LifestyleMom.com and the LifestyleMom Radio Cafe Aim to Help Women Create a Family Life and "Me Life" That They Truly Love
3. Women More Likely to Fail Treatment for Atrial Fibrillation
4. Diabetes drug ups risk for bone fractures in older women
5. Womens Heart Disease Awareness Still Lacking
6. Cyndi Lauper, Lady Gaga Put Spotlight on Women and HIV
7. American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report: Study Finds Racial Gaps Continue in Heart Disease Awareness, Low Knowledge of Heart Attack Warning Signs Among Women
8. Womens Dermatologic Society Marks 35th Anniversary with Release of Unprecedented Book of Wisdom and Inspiration
9. Few Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer Take Tamoxifen
10. Diane von Furstenberg Establishes The DVF Awards to Recognize Outstanding Women Leaders
11. YazTalk Warns Women of Life Threatening Side Effects
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Women Feel More Guilt, Distress About Work Intrusions at Home, Study Says
(Date:12/9/2016)... ... 2016 , ... The Pennsylvania Athletic Trainers’ Society (PATS) aired ... of 2016. The program was made possible by a Pennsylvania Department of Health ... and Human Services Administration. The broadcast, Use Your Head: Properly Managing Sport ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Islandia, NY (PRWEB) , ... December 08, 2016 ... ... company, is pleased to announce that “Natural Language Processing–Enabled and Conventional Data Capture ... published in JMIR Medical Informatics . , Results of the comparative usability ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... ... David J. Dykeman , Ginger Pigott , and J. Rick ... West, Dec. 12, 2016, at the Fairmont Newport Beach in California. Greenberg Traurig is ... Sciences & Medical Technology Group have been featured speakers at every DeviceTalks conference since ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... , ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... Center has been recognized for adherence to the highest standards of trauma, ... accreditation organizations, announced the center's president and CEO, Dr. Daniel Messina. , Among ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Vida Health, the digital health platform that pairs ... Canvas Ventures . Other investors include Nokia Growth Partners (NGP) and returning investor Aspect ... consumers who are managing chronic conditions or simply want to improve their ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... , Dec. 8, 2016 Australia Glaucoma ... GlobalData,s new report, "Australia Glaucoma Surgery Devices ... on the Australia Glaucoma Surgery Devices market. The ... volume (in units) and average prices (USD) within ... report also provides company shares and distribution shares ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... , Dec. 8, 2016 KEY FINDINGS ... poised to grow in 2017-2023. Various reasons for growth ... obese population, higher incidences of chronic diseases, high recovery ... mobility aid services. Medical lifting sling refers to ... with limited mobility. These slings connect to the lift ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... INDIANAPOLIS , Dec. 8, 2016  Eli Lilly ... detailed results of its phase 3 EXPEDITION3 trial at ... (CTAD) meeting. As previously disclosed, solanezumab did not meet ... study of solanezumab initiated in people with mild dementia ... pursue regulatory submissions for solanezumab for the treatment of ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: