Navigation Links
Witnessing, Experiencing Traumatic Events May Worsen Heart Disease
Date:4/4/2012

WEDNESDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- Large amounts of lifetime exposure to traumatic stress -- even when it doesn't result in post-traumatic stress disorder -- boosts inflammation levels in heart disease patients, a new study suggests.

The findings are important because it's known that heart disease patients with higher levels of inflammation tend to fare worse, according to the researchers at the University of California, San Francisco and the San Francisco VA Medical Center.

They looked at the exposures to 18 types of traumatic events experienced by nearly 1,000 patients aged 45 to 90 with cardiovascular disease. All the traumatic events involved either experiencing or witnessing a direct threat to life or physical well-being.

The more traumatic stress patients experienced in a lifetime, the more likely they were to have elevated levels of inflammatory markers in their bloodstream. When the surviving patients were checked again five years later, those who reported the highest levels of traumatic stress at the start of the study still had the highest levels of inflammation.

The study was recently published online in the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity.

"Even though we lost some study participants because they died, we still observed the same relationship in those who remained," lead author Aoife O'Donovan, a fellow in psychiatry at UCSF and the VA Medical Center, said in a university news release. "This suggests that it wasn't just the people who were the most sick at the outset who were driving this effect."

The researchers also found that the association between large amounts of traumatic stress in a lifetime and elevated levels of inflammation remained even after they adjusted for mental health disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression.

"Not everyone who is exposed to trauma develops PTSD," senior investigator Dr. Beth Cohen, a VA physician and an assistant professor of medicine at UCSF, said in the news release.

"This study emphasizes that traumatic stress can have a long-term negative impact on your health even if you don't go on to develop PTSD. It also tells us that, as clinicians, we need to think about not just which diagnostic box someone might fit into, but what their lifetime trauma exposure has been," she explained.

While the study found an association between trauma and higher inflammatory markers, it did not prove that trauma directly worsens inflammation or heart disease.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more about stress.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: University of California, San Francisco, news release, March 29, 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Study finds youth-mentor relationships particularly helpful for those experiencing hardship
2. Use of decision-aid program increases safety for women experiencing abuse, researchers find
3. New Website and Self-Help Book Validate Women Experiencing Grief After an Abortion
4. Why is traumatic brain injury increasing among the elderly?
5. Childhood traumatic experiences associated with adult IBS symptoms
6. Whole-Body CT Scans Can Miss Traumatic Injuries: Study
7. New high definition fiber tracking reveals damage caused by traumatic brain injury, Pitt team finds
8. Drug Seems to Speed Recovery After Traumatic Brain Injury
9. UCLA scientists report link between traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder
10. British Troops Have Lower Rate of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
11. Traumatic injury sets off a genomic storm in immune system pathways
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/19/2017)... , ... January 19, 2017 , ... St. Catherine’s Village ... , Siena Center is a skilled nursing facility on the grounds of the St. ... rooms. It recently was voted the best nursing home in Mississippi for the second ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Attorney Robert “RC” Pate , founder of The Law ... Triumph Over Kid Cancer foundation. Each year, 175,000 children are diagnosed with pediatric cancers. ... the effect of the critical funding gap for research into pediatric cancer research. From ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... Creative messages to prevent ... contest from Impact Teen Drivers and California Casualty. Entries from students aged 14-22 ... grants totaling $15,000 will be awarded for the best peer-to-peer messages sharing solutions ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... Norwalk, CT (PRWEB) , ... January 19, 2017 ... ... board certified Reproductive Endocrinologists at Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) have ... Hurwitz, Dr. Cynthia Murdock and Dr. Shaun Williams have each been chosen by ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... The CHP suggests that ... a rain storm by slowing down and increasing the space between themselves and other ... Angeles based car accident attorney Raymond R. Hassanlou notes that, rain or shine, drivers ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... 2017 The global  pacemaker market  is expected to reach ... Research, Inc. The heightening prevalence of cardiac conditions coupled with the availability of ... In addition, technological enhancements in these devices are supporting the expansion of this ... ... Grand View Research Logo ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... NEW YORK , January 18, 2017 , , ... rd distribution agreement, following similar agreements ...   , Wound care is $2 5 ...   , E-QURE Corp. (OTCQB: EQUR), a leader in medical devices ... agreement with Tech - Médica Equipos Médicos S.A.S. (TeckMedica) in Colombia ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... -- ViewRay, Inc. (Nasdaq: VRAY ), makers ... radiation therapy system, announced today that it has raised ... a private placement of its common stock and ... was joined by certain of ViewRay,s existing investors, ... and an additional new institutional investor, Acuta Capital ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: