Navigation Links
With age comes a sense of peace and calm
Date:5/20/2008

AUSTIN, TexasAging brings a sense of peace and calm, according to a new study from the Population Research Center at The University of Texas at Austin. Starting at about age 60, participants reported more feelings of ease and contentment than their younger counterparts.

Catherine Ross and John Mirowsky, professors of sociology, have published the findings in Age and the Balance of Emotions in the May 19 issue of Social Science and Medicine. The research was funded in part by the National Institute on Aging.

The findings reveal aging is associated with more positive than negative emotions, and more passive than active emotions, Ross said.

Previous research on emotions associated with aging focused on negative emotions, such as depression. However, a second dimension underlying emotions is an active versus passive dimension, which is less studied, but may be important in explaining how emotions shift as people age, according to the researchers.

The passive/positive combination reveals that contentment, calm and ease are some of the most common emotions people feel as they age, Ross said. Emotions that are both active and negative, such as anxiety and anger, are especially unlikely among the elderly.

The study examined 1,450 responses to the 1996 U.S. General Social Survey conducted by the National Opinion Research Center, which included English-speaking people aged 18 and older. The gender distribution of the sample was 56 percent female and 44 percent male, and the racial distribution was 81 percent white, 14 percent African American and 5 percent other races.

Participants responded to statements such as On how many days in the past seven days have you...felt that you couldnt shake the blues, felt sad, felt lonely, felt anxious and tense, felt worried, felt so restless that you couldnt sit long in a chair, felt angry at someone, felt mad at someone, felt outraged at something somebody had done, felt calm, felt at ease, felt contented, felt happy, felt overjoyed by something, felt excited about or interested in something, felt proud, felt embarrassed, felt ashamed.

The researchers then grouped the emotions in four categories: active, passive, positive and negative.

Secondary findings reveal women had more negative than positive emotions, and more passive than active emotions than men. Also, participants with higher income and education levels had significantly more positive emotions than those with lower income and education levels.


'/>"/>

Contact: Catherine Ross
cross@prc.utexas.edu
239-395-2941
University of Texas at Austin
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study concludes no racial disparities in long-term outcomes in recipients of liver transplants
2. With age comes a sense of peace and calm, population research center study shows
3. Outcomes Similar for Laparoscopic, Open Colon Cancer Surgeries
4. Study suggests blood test can help improve treatment outcomes for breast cancer patients
5. AUA 2008: Access to urologists and prostate cancer screenings lead to better outcomes for patients
6. HPV Tied to Better Tongue, Tonsil Cancer Outcomes
7. A Better Tomorrow Becomes One of the First Rehabilitation Clinics in the Nation to Offer Financing for Its Drug, Alcohol and Gambling Treatment Programs
8. Clot-Busting Treatment Improves Bleeding Stroke Outcomes
9. Target Data Research Becomes the Largest Sponsor for the Annual 2008 Steppin Forward Benefit
10. Gulfport-Biloxi Airport Welcomes Installation of New YoNaturals Healthy Vending Machines
11. Andre Agassi College Preparatory School Welcomes YoNaturals Healthy Vending Program
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... 10, 2016 , ... United Benefit Advisors (UBA), the nation’s ... to its growing list of Partner Firms. S.S. Nesbitt is headquartered in ... Huntsville and in between. , Harnessing the experience and insights of the agency’s ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... 2016 , ... AHRA: The Association for Medical Imaging Management ... will serve as keynote speaker at the organization’s 2016 Spring Conference. Fox’s topic, ... effectively communicate with their own organizational staff and leadership. , “I am ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Palm Beach, Florida (PRWEB) , ... February 10, ... ... & Country Club) announced that it has been awarded the prestigious Distinguished Emerald ... the World award program conducted by BoardRoom magazine, one of the most respected ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... Workrite Ergonomics this week ... series of monitor mounts ever. , “Our goal was to develop a product ... install system that we have ever created.” said Darren Hulsey, Product Manager for Workrite ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... , ... A new leadership team for Mid-South Youth Camp, operated by Freed-Hardeman ... announcement Monday night, Feb. 8, prior to the evening session of the university’s 80th ... of GO! Camp, has been named director. Gayle McDonald, currently the assistant director of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... 10, 2016 Urologix, the market leader for ... Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH), announces new private ownership and ... a medical device industry veteran of more than 20 ... Company.  Plymouth, Minn. ... ThermoTherapy™ and Prostiva® RF Therapy, will continue to be ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... -- A Worldwide Clinical Trials expert will present ... Park Plaza in London , 24-25 February ... future advances for late phase research on Wednesday, 24 Feb ... associate director of project management at Worldwide, will focus on ... and standards in late phase research. --> ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... DIEGO , Feb. 10, 2016  Visage ... Pro Medicus Ltd. (ASX: PME), has announced that the ... of Florida (UF) have selected the Visage 7 ... viewer of the Emergent/Critical Care Imaging SIMulation (SIM). ... in Diagnostic Imaging Program (WIDI), a multi-faceted and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: