Navigation Links
Wireless Device Can Cut Heart Failure-Related Hospitalizations

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers report that a wireless implanted device monitors fluid build-up in the lungs of heart failure patients and alerts doctors when intervention is needed.

As a result, the device reduces hospitalizations and improves quality of life for these patients, they added.

"It is the build-up of fluid pressure in the lungs that causes symptoms such a shortness of breath and leads to fluid leaking into the lung, which is the major cause of hospitalization in heart failure patients," explained study author Dr. William T. Abraham, director of the division of cardiovascular medicine at Ohio State University Medical Center in Columbus.

By monitoring the fluid pressure in the lungs, the doctor can adjust the patient's medication to bring the pressure levels down and keep the patient out of the hospital, he noted.

"This promises to revolutionize the way we manage patients who have moderate or severe heart failure," Abraham said. "Prior to this, the tools that we could use to evaluate how heart failure patients were doing were not very revealing and so we have failed to keep patients out of the hospital."

The report is published in the Feb. 9 online edition of The Lancet.

For the study, Abraham's group randomly assigned 550 patients with moderately severe heart failure to have the device implanted or not, in addition to standard medical care.

The device is placed in the pulmonary artery in the lung using a catheter, so the procedure is minimally invasive, Abraham added.

During the first six months, 83 patients with devices were hospitalized for heart failure-related problems, compared with 120 patients who did not have the device, the researchers found. That's a 30 percent reduction in hospitalizations, they noted.

Over the entire 15 months of follow-up, those with the device had a 39 percent reduction in hospitalizations, compared with those who didn't, Abraham's team found.

Data from the device is picked up by an antenna outside the body that sends the information to physicians and also keeps the device powered, Abraham said.

The device has not yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Abraham noted, but it is undergoing the approval process now.

If approved, it is expected to cost about $15,000, Abraham said. "A single hospitalization for heart failure costs somewhere in the neighborhood of $12,000 to $14,000. So, just avoiding one hospitalization can make this cost-effective," he said.

Moreover, patients seem to like the device, Abraham noted: "One of our patients said they felt like we were always watching them and it gives them a sense of connectiveness to the physician and a sense of security."

Commenting on the study, Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, said that "this study represents a major advance in the management of patients with heart failure."

Heart failure results in substantial morbidity, mortality and health care expenditures, with more than 1 million hospitalizations for heart failure each year in the United States alone, he said.

"Worsening of congestion results in the majority of hospitalizations with heart failure, but traditional methods of monitoring symptoms and signs of heart failure have had limited success in preventing hospitalizations for heart failure," Fonarow said.

"Wireless implantable monitoring allows for early detection of fluid accumulation, before a patient notices changes in symptoms or weight, allowing for preemptive management to address this fluid accumulation and to prevent hospitalization for worsening heart failure," he said.

The trial was funded by CardioMEMS, the maker of the device.

More information

For more information on heart failure, visit the American Heart Association.

SOURCES: William T. Abraham, M.D., director, division of cardiovascular medicine, and professor, internal medicine, physiology and cell biology, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus; Gregg Fonarow, M.D., spokesman, American Heart Association, and professor, cardiology, University of California, Los Angeles; Feb. 9, 2011, The Lancet, online

Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Aerohive Positioned in the “Visionaries” Quadrant of the Magic Quadrant for Wireless LAN Infrastructure
2. Mennen Medical Launches the VitaLogik 6000, a Pre-Configured Multi-Parameter Patient Monitor with New High Performance Wireless Technology
3. NHS Lincolnshire Applies Intuitive ‘Cooperative Control' Wireless LAN
4. Wireless LAN Innovator Aerohive Secures $23.5 Million Series C Investment
5. Wireless health care for diabetes
6. NHS Mid Essex Prescribes Wireless Network For New Hospital Wing
7. Framingham Public School District Selects Aerohive for its Next Generation Wireless Network
8. EnGenius Technologies, Inc. Delivers High Performance, Long Range Wireless Network to Dawson Independent School District
9. Embedded Mobile & M2M Device revenues to Rise to Almost $19 Billion Globally by 2014, Says Juniper Research
10. Scott & White Memorial Hospital uses device to revolutionize treatment of traumatic aortic injury
11. Clinical trial underway: Miniature ultrasound device could revolutionize pain relief
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Wireless Device Can Cut Heart Failure-Related Hospitalizations 
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... , ... According to an article published November 6th by The ... of British Columbia suggested that laws requiring bicyclists to wear helmets may not actually ... the reason for the controversial conclusion is that, while helmets have certainly prevented a ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... toilets were," said an inventor from Hillside, N.J. "Many people catch diseases simply ... so that individuals will always be protected from germs." , He developed the ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... of progress through sharing, the 2016 Building Better Radiology Marketing Programs ... will begin on Sunday, March 6, 2016, at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... CBD College is proud to ... Programs (CAAHEP) awarded accreditation to its Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. CBD College is honored ... one of twelve colleges and universities in the state of California make the cut. ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... Patients at Serenity ... have come together on Thanksgiving Day to share the things that they are ... the Serenity Point YouTube channel, patients displayed what they wrote on index cards, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... India , November 27, ... --> --> ... personal emergency response system (PERS) ... steadily for 5 years with ... region expected to see a ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... -- --> --> Juntendo ... optimal contrast weighting of MRI for patients with Multiple ... research agreement with SyntheticMR in order to use SyMRI in ... possible to generate multiple contrast images from a single scan ... thus making it possible to both fine tune images and ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... 2015 ... the  "2016 Future Horizons and Growth ... Testing Market: Supplier Shares, Competitive Intelligence, ... --> ) has ... Future Horizons and Growth Strategies in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: