Navigation Links
Wii key to helping kids balance
Date:4/12/2011

By cleverly linking five Wii Balance Boards, a team of Rice University undergraduates has combined the appeal of a video game with the utility of a computerized motion-tracking system that can enhance the progress of patients at Shriners Hospital for Children-Houston.

The Rice engineering students created the new device using components of the popular Nintendo game system to create a balance training system.

What the kids may see as a fun video game is really a sophisticated way to help them advance their skills. The Wii Balance Boards lined up between handrails will encourage patients age 6 to 18 to practice their balance skills in an electronic gaming environment. The active handrails, which provide feedback on how heavily patients depend on their arms, are a unique feature.

Many of the children targeted for this project have cerebral palsy, spina bifida or amputations. Using the relatively inexpensive game console components improves the potential of this system to become a cost-effective addition to physical therapy departments in the future.

Steven Irby, an engineer at Shriners' Motion Analysis Laboratory, pitched the idea to Rice's engineering mentors after the success of last year's Trek Tracker project, a computer-controlled camera system for gait analysis that was developed by engineering students at Rice's Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen (OEDK).

The engineering seniors who chose to tackle this year's new project -- Michelle Pyle, Drew Berger and Matt Jones, aka Team Equiliberators -- hope to have the system up and running at Shriners Hospital before they graduate next month.

"He (Irby) wants to get kids to practice certain tasks in their games, such as standing still, then taking a couple of steps and being able to balance, which is pretty difficult for some of them," Pyle said. "The last task is being able to take a couple of steps and then turn around."

"This isn't a measurement device as much as it is a game," Irby said. "But putting the two systems together is what makes it unique. The Wii system is not well suited to kids with significant balance problems; they can't play it. So we're making something that is more adaptable to them."

The game requires patients to shoot approaching monsters by hitting particular spots with their feet as they step along the Wii array, computer science student Jesus Cortez, one of the game's creators, explained. The game gets harder as the patients improve, he said, and the chance to rack up points gives them an incentive.

A further step, not yet implemented, would be to program feedback from the handrails into the game. Leaning on the rails would subtract points from the users' scores, encouraging them to improve their postures. The game would also present challenges specific to younger and older children to keep them engaged.

The programming team also includes undergraduate Irina Patrikeeva and graduate student Nick Zhu. Studio arts undergraduate Jennifer Humphreys created the artwork.

The system's components include a PC, the Wii boards (aligned in a frame) and two balance beam-like handrails that read how much force patients are putting on their hands. Communications to the PC are handled via the Wii's native Bluetooth protocol.

The students said their prototype cost far less than the $2,000 they'd budgeted. Rice supplied the computer equipment and LabVIEW software they needed to create the diagnostic software that interfaces with Shriners' existing systems, and they purchased the Wii Balance Boards on eBay.

"Small force plates that people commonly use for such measurements cost at least a couple of grand, but Wii boards -- and people have done research on this -- give you a pretty good readout of your center of balance for what they cost," Pyle said.

Jones, who is building the final unit for delivery to Shriners, said he wants patients to see the Wii boards. "We're putting clear acrylic over the boards so there aren't any gaps that could trip up the younger ones," he said. "We wanted to use a device that's familiar to them, but they might not be convinced it's a Wii board unless they can see it."


'/>"/>

Contact: David Ruth
druth@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Explorers Bounty Puffed Fruit Snacks Helping Parents Battle Summer Obesity
2. Helping Turn "WannabeWELLS" into Wise Consumers
3. Leading U.S. Infertility Practice Opens Boston IVF The Maine Center in Portland, Helping Build Families in Maine
4. Doctor Joseph Racanelli is Helping Christina Get Back Her Shape After Brutal Attack
5. Star of TVs The Doctors Helping Put Smiles on Faces of Needy Children in India
6. A Small Grass-roots Non-profit, Announces That They Haven't Gone Away and are Still Alive with Helping the Disadvantaged Children in Ukraine
7. New Treatments and Good Skin Care Helping Patients Control Acne and Rosacea
8. LocalITCompanies.com now Helping Chicago, Dallas and Houston Businesses Find Pre-Screened IT Companies
9. The American Heart Association's The Heart of Diabetes Campaign is Helping Patients 'Know Your Diabetes' Better
10. Sisters Helping Sisters: A New Lupus Research Study to Follow Sisters of Lupus Patients
11. New England Journal of Medicine Article Trumpets “Priority” Status of Helping Patients Take Medications Correctly
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Wii key to helping kids balance
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... Intermedix announced on Wednesday that ... an emergency medicine professional association, to support the organization's newly established physician group ... of Emergency Medicine, or AAEM, seeks to empower emergency physicians to control their ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... Emergency rooms ... harder to find. Unfortunately, this can leave patients with dental emergencies at risk of ... is now offering emergency dental care. , Common dental emergencies include:, ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... 10, 2016 , ... Dr. Jessica Barron, of Barron Family Dental in ... patients and families in the North Metro Denver area. The new dental practice focuses ... dentistry, and all in the most relaxing environment. , While some dental visits can ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... United Benefit Advisors ... the latest addition to its growing list of Partner Firms. S.S. Nesbitt ... from Orlando to Huntsville and in between. , Harnessing the experience and insights ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... Armune BioScience ... across their network of laboratory service centers across the country. Launched in April of ... in the detection of prostate cancer. Apifiny order volume exceeded 3,000 tests in 2015. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... The campaign aims to ensure 2,50,532 ... reach the milestone of their 5 th birthday   --> ... between the ages of 2 - 5 years reach the ... campaign aims to ensure 2,50,532 children ... of their 5 th birthday   India , ...
(Date:2/9/2016)...  Misonix, Inc. (NASDAQ: MSON ), an ... markets innovative therapeutic ultrasonic products for spine surgery, ... surgery and other surgical applications, today announced financial ... half of fiscal year 2016 ended December 31, ... --> Highlights for the second quarter and ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... YORK, Pa., Feb. 9, 2016  Unilife Corporation ("Unilife" or "Company") ... of injectable drug delivery systems, today announced its financial results for ... 2015). ... Revenue for the ... million in the same period last year.  Cash receipts from customers ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: