Navigation Links
What's wrong with selling kidneys?
Date:6/13/2008

Doctors in this week's BMJ debate the issue of selling kidneys.

A regulated system of compensation for living donors may be the solution to the growing shortage of kidneys for transplantation, writes Arthur Matas, Professor of Surgery at the University of Minnesota.

In many areas of the United States the average wait for a transplant from a deceased donor is five years, but in some parts it is as long 10 years. Because of this the annual death rate for suitable transplant candidates has risen from 6.3% in 2001 to 8.1% in 2005.

Current unregulated systems in developing countries only benefit the rich, and provide no long term donor follow-up, or protection for either buyer or seller, he says.

In contrast, Matas argues, a regulated compensation system in the Western world would increase the number of available organs. Such a system would provide strict control and limit harm by allowing every candidate an opportunity for transplant, full donor evaluation, informed consent, long term health follow-up, with payment managed by the government or insurance companies, and the banning of any other commercialisation.

We already compensate people for sperm, ova, surrogate motherhood, and loss of body parts in court cases without any loss of dignity or humanity. Similarly, Matas concludes that we should allow a trial of compensation for living donation to learn if we can increase the number of kidneys while protecting the dignity and humanity of the donors.

But Jeremy Chapman, from the Centre for Transplant and Renal Research in Sydney, argues that this could reduce the supply of all organs.

He believes that the idea of the regulated market is a myth, which could have devastating consequences on the less easily regulated environments of Asia and Africa.

According to Chapman, selling organs does not help lift people out of poverty. In India and Pakistan people sell their kidneys to pay off debts, but they continue to live below the poverty line, and recent data show that 86% report deteriorating health after organ removal.

In addition, he asks, which family member would donate if the government is willing to pay for a kidney? Many would prefer a stranger rather than a family member to take the risk. What's more, if a kidney is worth money before death, then rather than donating, families may demand money for all sorts of organs after death.

The reality of regulated organ purchase will be a reduction in organ donation, and the destruction of kidney, heart, lung, liver, and pancreas transplantation, he concludes.


'/>"/>

Contact: Arthur Matas
matas001@umn.edu
612-625-9192
BMJ-British Medical Journal
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Connecticut Catholic Conference Wrong to Allow Plan B in Catholic Hospitals
2. ALLs Judie Brown: Supreme Court is Wrong on Contraception Ruling
3. Novel semiconductor structure bends light wrong way -- the right direction for many applications
4. DNC: Bush Republicans Have the Wrong Priorities
5. 63 percent of diabetics risk serious foot problems by wearing the wrong-sized shoes
6. Britney and K-Fed doing it all wrong, MU family researcher says
7. Diagnosis of Heart Attack Can Be Wrong
8. Patient Safety Authority Visits Facilities for Information on Wrong-Site Surgery
9. Pelosi: President Bushs Proposed Medicare and Medicaid Cuts Are Exactly the Wrong Medicine
10. Darwin Introduces Enhancements to its Lawyers Professional Liability Insurance Policy Including Privacy Wrongful Acts and More
11. Consumer Watchdog Praises CA HMO Regulators Promise to Reinstate Health Coverage for Wrongfully Cancelled Patients; Cautions That All Health Costs During Gap Must be Covered
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Marcy was in a crisis. Her son James, eight, was ... his family verbally and physically. , “When something upset him, he couldn’t control his emotions,” ... He would throw rocks at my other children and say he was going to kill ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... Dr. Amanda Cheng, an orthodontist ... has extensive experience with all areas of orthodontics, including robotic Suresmile technology, ... , Micro-osteoperforation is a revolutionary adjunct to orthodontic treatment. It can be used ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , ... June 24, 2016 , ... People across the ... Genome magazine’s Code Talker Award, an essay contest in which patients and their families ... to be presented at the 2016 National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Nevada (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... Vegas client, The Grove Investment Group (TGIG), has initiated cultivation and processing operations ... in Las Vegas and Pahrump, Nevada. , Puradigm is the manufacturer of a ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Venture Construction Group (VCG) sponsors Luke’s ... June 20th at the Woodmont Country Club at 1201 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland, 20852. ... helping service members that have been wounded in battle and their families. Venture Construction ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... 24, 2016   Bay Area Lyme Foundation ... Dean Center for Tick Borne Illness , Harvard ... MIT Hacking Medicine, University of California, Berkeley, and ... the five finalists of Lyme Innovation , ... than 100 scientists, clinicians, researchers, entrepreneurs, and investors ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... CLEMENTE, Calif. , June 24, 2016  American Respiratory Labs ... company, is now able to perform sophisticated lung assessments in patients, ... Technologies , Inc. Patients are no longer limited ... ndd,s EasyOne PRO ® , ARL patients like Jeanne R. of ... done in the comfort of her own home. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... June 24, 2016  Arkis BioSciences, a leading ... and more durable cerebrospinal fluid treatments, today announced ... Series-A funding is led by Innova Memphis, followed ... other private investors.  Arkis, new financing will accelerate ... the market release of its in-licensed Endexo® technology. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: