Navigation Links
Want to be safe? Move to the City. No, really.
Date:7/22/2013

WASHINGTON Large cities in the U.S. are significantly safer than their rural counterparts, with the risk of injury death more than 20 percent higher in the country. A study to be published online tomorrow in Annals of Emergency Medicine upends a common perception that urban areas are more dangerous than small towns ("Safety in Numbers: Are Major Cities the Safest Places in the U.S.?").

"Cars, guns and drugs are the unholy trinity causing the majority of injury deaths in the U.S.," said lead study author Sage Myers, MD, MSCE, of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pa. "Although the risk of homicide is higher in big cities, the risk of unintentional injury death is 40 percent higher in the most rural areas than in the most urban. And overall, the rate of unintentional injury dwarfs the risk of homicide, with the rate of unintentional injury more than 15 times that of homicide among the entire population. This has important implications about staffing of emergency departments and trauma care systems in rural areas, which tend to be underserved as it is."

Analyzing 1,295,919 injury deaths that occurred between 1999 and 2006, researchers determined that the risk of injury death was 22 percent higher in the most rural counties than in the most urban. The most common causes of injury death were motor vehicle crashes, leading to 27.61 deaths per 100,000 people in most rural areas and 10.58 per 100,000 in most urban areas. Though the risk of firearm-related death showed no difference across the rural-urban spectrum in the entire population as a whole, when age subgroups were studied, firearm-related deaths were found to be significantly higher in rural areas for children and people 45 years and older; however, for people age 20 to 44, the risk of firearm-related death was significantly lower in rural areas.

Race was also a factor. Rural counties with large black populations had significantly lower risk of injury death than those with small black populations. The opposite was true for Latino populations: Rural counties with large Latino populations had significantly higher risk of injury death than rural counties with small Latino populations.

Surprisingly, rural counties with the highest levels of college-educated inhabitants and median income had significantly increased risk of injury death compared to rural counties with the lowest levels of each.

"By digging deep into the data, we may be able to tailor injury prevention efforts to the populations that need them, such as seniors in cities who are more likely to fall and rural children who are more likely to drown," said Dr. Myers. "This data is relevant to staffing issues as well. Injury-related mortality risk is highest in the areas least likely to be covered by emergency physicians and least likely to have access to trauma care, which argues for using a population-planning approach to improve emergency and trauma care systems in the U.S."


'/>"/>

Contact: Julie Lloyd
jlloyd@acep.org
202-728-0610
American College of Emergency Physicians
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Is Combining Hysterectomy and a Tummy Tuck Safe?
2. Most prescription drugs manufactured overseas -- are they safe?
3. Botox – Is the World’s Most Popular Cosmetic Procedure Safe?
4. Is Your Garage Safe? Be Sure to Store Flammable Items Properly with Tips from Amica
5. TheHardwareCity.com Now Offering STEELHEAD Stainless Steel Fasteners
6. TheHardwareCity.com Now Offering Solar-Powered Rain Barrel Pump System
7. Stand Up Paddle Boarding Social Network & Marketplace, Supcity.com, Announces Launch
8. Native Remedy for Brushing Teeth; Zion Health’s Non Fluoride Mineral Toothpaste -ClayBrite Now Available at Westerly Natural Market in New York City.
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... Contrary to popular perception, ... is declining—and at noteworthy rates. Between 2002 and 2014, Salas-Wright and his colleagues ... violence in the United States. The study, Trends in Fighting and Violence ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (PRWEB) , ... April ... ... leading provider of wilderness therapy treatment for adolescents and young adults, has kicked ... Thursday, April 20th-Sunday, April 23rd. This year’s theme is “Attachment Informed Therapy ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Young Asset Protection, an insurance provider and ... greater Pittsburgh metropolitan region, is joining forces with the local chapter of the ... , Variety the Children’s Charity is a national organization dedicated to empowering, enabling, ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... April 21, 2017 , ... The adage ... Flex House, the next project in the company’s esteemed VISION House demonstration project series. ... use exactly the amount of resources they need to live affordably and abundantly without ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... The ... of Record (AOR) for Theravent, Inc. , the makers of a revolutionary ... Foundation Consumer Healthcare, is now working to expand distribution in anticipation of a ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)... Eyevensys, a private biotechnology company developing its ... that enables the safe, local, sustained production of therapeutic ... of ophthalmic diseases, announces it has received approval from ... to advance its technology into clinical development. ... The EyeCET platform uses ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... The Mobile X-Ray product segment is the most ... the forecast period Mobile X-Ray segment is the ... X-Ray devices market, which is estimated to be valued at ... CAGR of 7% over the forecast period. Mobile X-Ray segment ... US$ 100 Mn in 2017 over 2016. The segment,s revenue ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... 19, 2017 The Global Effective Microorganisms ... 2022 report has covered and analysed the potential of Global ... market size, shares and growth factors. The report identifies and ... opportunities in the global market. ... Browse 152 Tables and Figures, 6 Major Company Profiles, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: