Navigation Links
WSU study may lead to greater understanding of human genome regulation
Date:3/4/2011

DETROITMany multi-cellular animals use sex chromosomes to determine sex. In fruit flies and in humans, this produces XX for females and XY for males. Cellular mechanisms then kick into gear to compensate the two-to-one imbalance of X-linked genes in females and males.

Victoria Meller, Ph.D., associate professor of biological sciences and resident of Huntington Woods, Mich., received $301,392 from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to investigate the role of a type of RNA in the X chromosome dosage compensation of Drosophila, or fruit flies. The findings are likely to improve the understanding of gene regulation in humans, which employ similar cellular tools to regulate their complex genome.

Uncovering clues in genetic regulation in humans is instrumental in understanding a wide range of pathologies, including cancer, developmental abnormalities and some birth defects. The misregulation of large groups of genes is characteristic of these diseases.

There are significant differences in the way humans and fruit flies achieve X chromosome dosage compensation. "Humans double the expression of genes on the X chromosome, then deactivate one X chromosome in the female," Meller said. "Taking a much simpler approach, fruit flies double the X-expression from the male X chromosome and keep the female level the same."

Although these approaches differ, humans and flies both use regulatory complexes that recognize the X chromosome. These complexes bind to and alter chromatin, the structure formed by DNA and associated proteins, to change the expression of the entire chromosome. "It's somewhat of a mystery, though, how these complexes identify the X chromosome," Meller said.

Recently, Meller's lab uncovered clues that a class of non-coding RNA called RNAi plays a role in X chromosome recognition. Her current study will explore the role of RNAi, along with short DNA sequences on the X chromosome, in X chromosome recognition.

Because of the similarities of human and fruit fly X chromosome recognition, findings from Meller's lab are likely to contribute to the understanding of gene regulation in humans. "Exploring how organisms achieve overall regulation of large groups of genes is basic research," said Meller. "Flies and mammals have the same tool kit for regulating their genome, and we are looking at how they use it."

"New information on how regulation works may lead to greater understanding of how those systems sometimes fail and how future medical interventions can potentially treat these health problems," Meller said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. White Patients Most Likely to Get Kidney Transplants: Study
2. Risk of Drug-Resistant Staph Infection in Gym Low: Study
3. Parks Add Options for Kids Exercise, Study Finds
4. Scripps Research study points to liver, not brain, as origin of Alzheimers plaques
5. Study Finds Third of Cancer Patients on Opioids Are Confused
6. Diabetes Ups Death Risk Overall, Study Shows
7. Men in low income neighborhoods drink more than women: Study
8. Latest findings of Dartmouth HIV/AIDS study could turn treatment on its head
9. 6 out of 10 male drug-addicts abuse their partners, a study says
10. Study finds MRSA danger in gyms may be exaggerated
11. 6-month drug regimen cuts HIV risk for breastfeeding infants, NIH study finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... February 06, 2016 , ... Shark Finds and Kevin Harrington, ... a new DRTV campaign with Belly Bands. , Having a dog is great—except when ... puppy pads and find nothing works, get Belly Bands, the easiest way to ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... Today, the Whole-Food Warrior TV show, ... much-anticipated feature with author Jahnavi Foster, specialist in healthy vegetarian cuisine, will stream on ... week, on his weekly Whole-Food Warrior TV show, Frank Davis highlights Whole-Food Warriors - ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... York, New York (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... life? The answer may be at the tips of your toes. Foot massage, whether ... as well as pure comfort and relaxation. The American Board of Multiple Specialties ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... franchises from across the country gathered at the La Valencia Hotel in San ... PROSHRED Chicago was named the year’s most outstanding franchise, walking away with ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... in the 2015 Best in KLAS: Software & Services for HIT Implementation Support ... in KLAS report independently ranks vendor performance by healthcare executives, managers and clinicians ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/4/2016)... LODI, N.J. , Feb. 4, 2016  Montoya ... Pinnacle Professional in the field of Pharmaceuticals. Montoya is ... . ... and supplies, Becton Dickinson provides healthcare institutions, ... medical equipment throughout fifty countries across the globe. ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... LONDON , Feb. 4, 2016 ... and competitive market to drive long-term market growth ... very common set of chronic disorders that affect ... disparate in terms of their symptoms and key ... by dysregulation of immune pathways and an inappropriate ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... -- Omnicell, Inc. (NASDAQ: OMCL ), a leading provider of ... announced results for its fiscal year and fourth quarter ... --> GAAP results: Revenue for the fourth quarter ... 4.1% from the third quarter of 2015, and up ... 2014. Revenue for the year ended December 31, 2015 was ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: