Navigation Links
Viral microRNAs responsible for causing AIDS-related cancer, new USC study shows

LOS ANGELES - For the first time, scientists and engineers have identified a critical cancer-causing component in the virus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma, the most common cancer among HIV-infected people. The discovery lays the foundation for developing drugs that prevent Kaposi's sarcoma and other related cancers.

"The mechanism behind the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) that causes healthy cells to become malignant is not well understood despite two decades of intensive studies," said S. J. Gao, Ph.D., professor of molecular microbiology and immunology at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) and principal investigator of the study. "This is the first time that a viral factor has been shown to be required for KSHV-induced malignant transformation. We have identified a mechanism by which these tiny viral molecules cause the cells to become malignant."

Distinguished by dark lesions on the skin, Kaposi's sarcoma most commonly develops in people who are infected with KSHV and also have compromised immune systems. Although many people infected with KSHV never show any symptoms, Kaposi's sarcoma is a persistent problem in areas where HIV infection is high and access to HIV therapy is limited. More than 90 percent of the population in some areas of Africa shows signs of KSHV infection, according to the American Cancer Society.

Gao and colleagues from the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio studied KSHV using a rat stem cell model they developed in 2012. Until then, researchers had been unable to study the virus because most healthy cells, once infected with KSHV, died before turning into cancer cells.

In this study, which appears in the Dec. 26 edition of the peer-reviewed journal PLOS Pathogens, the team identifies a cluster of viral microRNA molecules that are necessary to transform healthy cells into cancerous ones. When this microRNA cluster was suppressed, the cells died after they were infected with KSHV. Flipping the switch and turning the cluster back "on," however, allowed the cells to stay alive and become malignant when infected with the virus.

Using advanced genomic methods, the researchers also found that the microRNAs target the IκBα protein and the NF-κB cellular pathway, both of which are associated with cancer development.

"Our results suggest that this cluster of KSHV microRNAs and their regulated NF-κB pathway may be potential targets for new therapeutics of KSHV-related cancers," said Gao, who is also a member of the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. "Several of the microRNAs appear to have redundant functions, so targeting their common pathways might be a more feasible approach. It would be interesting to test them in the KSHV-induced Kaposi's sarcoma model."

Contact: Alison Trinidad
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Related medicine news :

1. Does the bodys immune response to viral vector delivery systems affect the safety or efficacy of gene therapy?
2. Population Council awarded USAID cooperative agreement to develop non-antiretroviral HIV microbicide
3. PDL-1 antibody could help immune system fight off influenza viral infection, study suggests
4. BU researchers explore possible link between cognitive depressive symptoms and antiretroviral therapy uptake
5. Advanced Back Pain Website Tool is a Viral Approach to Treatment
6. Risk of HIV treatment failure present even in those with low viral load
7. Study identifies protein essential for immune recognition, response to viral infection
8. Pregnant women with hepatitis C may pass heartier viral strain to newborns, study suggests
9. Findings: How viral infection disrupts neural development in offspring, increasing risk of autism
10. Casey Gollan’s: Viral Marketing 101: A Complete Guide for Businesses
11. UC Davis Researchers Find How Viral Infection Disrupts Neural Development in Offspring, Increasing Risk of Autism
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/26/2015)... , ... November 26, 2015 , ... Jobs in hospital ... healthcare professionals and offered by healthcare staffing agency Aureus Medical Group . ... month of October 2015 among those searching for healthcare jobs through the company’s website, ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... WorldCare ... participated in the 61st annual Employee Benefits Conference. The Employee Benefits Conference was ... November 8th through Wednesday, November 11th, 2015. The conference was held at the ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , ... November 26, 2015 ... ... platform for mental health and wellness consultation, has collaborated with Women’s Web ... address their reader’s queries on topics on mental and emotional well-being relationship, ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Additional breast ... found on mammography, according to a study published online in the journal Radiology. ... on mammography may necessitate a change in treatment. , Breast MRI is the ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... 25, 2015 , ... The holiday season is jam-packed with ... palates of attendees is of the utmost importance. Whether you are cooking at ... these recipes a try this holiday season. , Turkey Croquettes , ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 ... Juntendo universitetssjukhus ser potential att använda ... magnetresonansbilder (MR-bilder) för patienter med multipel ... ett forskningsavtal med SyntheticMR AB för att ... forskningsprojekt på sjukhuset. Med SyMRI kan man ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... 26, 2015 ... adds "Global Repaglinide Industry 2015 ... on China Repaglinide Market, 2010-2019" reports ... and information to its online business ... . --> ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... DUBLIN , November 26, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... the addition of the "Radioimmunoassay Market ... User (Hospital, Pharmaceutical Industry, Academics, Clinical Diagnostic ... - Global Forecast to 2020" report ... ) has announced the addition of the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: