Navigation Links
Violent TV Shows Keep Young Kids Awake: Study
Date:8/6/2012

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- There's more evidence that watching violent or age-inappropriate images on TV, in movies or on computers can significantly disrupt children's sleep.

Kids between 3 and 5 years old who were exposed only to age-appropriate viewing materials in the hour before bed were 64 percent less likely to have any type of sleep disturbance, such as trouble falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep or nightmares, according to a new study.

Perhaps surprisingly, "violent" media might even include popular kids' fare such as SpongeBob SquarePants, said the study's lead author, Michelle Garrison.

"Making a relatively simple change in what kids are watching is a change worth the effort," said Garrison, a principal investigator at the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Seattle Children's Research Institute. "Sometimes parents feel overwhelmed by the idea of getting rid of TV altogether, but switching shows can make a big difference."

The study will be published in the September issue of the journal Pediatrics, and was released online Aug. 6.

Numerous studies have linked media use with sleep problems, but most of these studies have had children of various ages and varying media use. It also hasn't been clear whether watching something right before bed is stimulating in itself or if the content of the media plays a role.

The current study included nearly 600 children aged 3 to 5 living in the Seattle area. Families were randomized into one of two groups: One group received a home visit, follow-up phone calls and mailings with coaching about how to make better media choices for their young children; the other group simply received mailings about nutrition.

The researchers didn't attempt to reduce the total number of hours of media use. The goal instead was to reduce violent and age-inappropriate content.

The types of programming that are considered age-inappropriate might surprise you.

"An 8-year-old can watch superheroes and understand that it's not what happens in real life," Garrison said. "But the same content can be overwhelming and scary for a 3-year-old. The idea that people might just explode is scary for a 3-year-old."

Garrison said the research suggests that parents should instead select shows such as Sesame Street, Curious George and Dora the Explorer. "These shows can be beneficial for preschool children to watch, because they emphasize things such as literacy, numbers and social skills," she said.

"When kids in this age group watched violent or age-inappropriate media, they were more likely to have nightmares, have a hard time falling asleep and wake up during the night," Garrison said.

The researchers found the opposite was true when kids watched nonviolent, age-appropriate media. These youngsters were 64 percent less likely to have any sleep problems.

"Clearly, children process information while they sleep. If it's the last thing they do before bed, they'll be processing that as they sleep," said Dr. Sangeeta Chakravorty, director of the Pediatric Sleep Evaluation Center at Children's Hospital in Pittsburgh.

Ideally, Garrison said, children this age wouldn't be engaged with any media in the hour before bed.

"Even shows with really good content can still be a problem for sleep," she said. "When kids are reading a book or playing with toys before bed, they control the pace. But TV ramps their brains up when they're trying to slow down."

Chakravorty agreed. "Electronic stimulation at bedtime can affect your child's sleep and affect their thinking process," she said. "It's best to avoid exposure altogether at least an hour before bedtime. But if your children are watching something before bed, make sure it's age appropriate."

More information

To read more about children's sleep, visit the Nemours Foundation.

SOURCES: Michelle Garrison, Ph.D., acting assistant professor, department of health services, University of Washington, and principal investigator, Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle; Sangeeta Chakravorty, M.D., director, Pediatric Sleep Evaluation Center, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh; Sept. 2012 Pediatrics


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Are women with a history of violent experiences more likely to have risky sex?
2. Wellesley study shows income inequality a key factor in high US teen births
3. Invasive heart test being dramatically overused, Stanford study shows
4. Novel compound demonstrates anti-leukemic effect in zebrafish, shows promise for human treatment
5. Lung Cancer Screening Might Pay Off, Analysis Shows
6. Nonsurgical Method to Measure Brain Pressure Shows Promise
7. BMC study shows diverting passengers to elevators could help reduce falls at Logan Airport
8. Study Shows New Option for Kids With Tough-to-Treat Leukemia
9. Politics May Get in the Way of Empathy, Research Shows
10. Live imaging shows response to cancer drugs can be boosted by altering tumor microenvironment
11. Experimental Pill for Multiple Sclerosis Shows Promise
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Violent TV Shows Keep Young Kids Awake: Study
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Global law firm Greenberg Traurig, P.A. ... The attorneys chosen by their peers for this recognition are considered among the top ... Shareholders received special honors as members of this year’s Legal Elite Hall of Fame: ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Diego, CA (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... with the American Cancer Society and the Road To Recovery® program to drive cancer ... to seniors and other adults to ensure the highest quality of life and ongoing ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... People across the U.S. are sharpening their pencils ... an essay contest in which patients and their families pay tribute to a genetic ... 2016 National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education Conference (AEC) this September. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The ... recognize Dr. Barry M. Weintraub as a prominent plastic surgeon and the network’s ... the world, and the most handsome men, look naturally attractive. Plastic surgery should ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... the Frederick area economy by obtaining investment capital for emerging technology companies. ... years that have already resulted in more than a million dollars of capital ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016  Global Blood Therapeutics, ... company developing novel therapeutics for the treatment of ... announced the closing of its previously announced underwritten ... at the public offering price of $18.75 per ... were offered by GBT. GBT estimates net proceeds ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... DUBLIN , June 24, 2016 ... and Markets has announced the addition of the ... their offering. ... products and provides an updated review, including its applications ... covering the total market, which includes three main industries: ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... -- The Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP) today ... allow biopharmaceutical companies to more easily share health care ... coverage decisions, a move that addresses the growing need ... The recommendations address restrictions in the sharing of product ... a prohibition that hinders decision makers from accessing HCEI ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: