Navigation Links
Vanderbilt study explores genetics behind Alzheimer's resiliency
Date:5/2/2014

Autopsies have revealed that some individuals develop the cellular changes indicative of Alzheimer's disease without ever showing clinical symptoms in their lifetime.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center memory researchers have discovered a potential genetic variant in these asymptomatic individuals that may make brains more resilient against Alzheimer's.

"Most Alzheimer's research is searching for genes that predict the disease, but we're taking a different approach. We're looking for genes that predict who among those with Alzheimer's pathology will actually show clinical symptoms of the disease," said principal investigator Timothy Hohman, Ph.D., a post-doctoral research fellow in the Center for Human Genetics Research and the Vanderbilt Memory and Alzheimer's Center.

The article, "Genetic modification of the relationship between phosphorylated tau and neurodegeneration," was published online recently in the journal Alzheimer's and Dementia.

The researchers used a marker of Alzheimer's disease found in cerebrospinal fluid called phosphorylated tau. In brain cells, tau is a protein that stabilizes the highways of cellular transport in neurons. In Alzheimer's disease tau forms "tangles" that disrupt cellular messages.

Analyzing a sample of 700 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, Hohman and colleagues looked for genetic variants that modify the relationship between phosphorylated tau and lateral ventricle dilation a measure of disease progression visible with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One genetic mutation (rs4728029) was found to relate to both ventricle dilation and cognition and is a marker of neuroinflammation.

"This gene marker appears to be related to an inflammatory response in the presence of phosphorylated tau," Hohman said.

"It appears that certain individuals with a genetic predisposition toward a 'bad' neuroinflammatory response have neurodegeneration. But those with a genetic predisposition toward no inflammatory response, or a reduced one, are able to endure the pathology without marked neurodegeneration."

Hohman hopes to expand the study to include a larger sample and investigate gene and protein expression using data from a large autopsy study of Alzheimer's disease.

"The work highlights the possible mechanism behind asymptomatic Alzheimer's disease, and with that mechanism we may be able to approach intervention from a new perspective. Future interventions may be able to activate these innate response systems that protect against developing Alzheimer's symptoms," Hohman said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Vanderbilt study finds physical signs of depression common among ICU survivors
2. Vanderbilt study: Ancient chemical bond may aid cancer therapy
3. Vanderbilt study finds limited resources for injured surgeons
4. AxoGen, Inc. Receives Grant in Partnership with Vanderbilt University from U.S. Department of Defense
5. Vanderbilt study finds lack of exercise not a factor in health disparities
6. Vanderbilt study finds maternal diet important predictor of severity for infant RSV
7. Vanderbilt study reveals clues to childhood respiratory virus
8. Vanderbilt study examines Affordable Care Acts impact on uncompensated care
9. Vanderbilt study finds diverse genetic alterations in triple-negative breast cancers
10. UNC, Vanderbilt discover a new live vaccine approach for SARS and novel coronaviruses
11. Vanderbilt study looks at benefits of progestogens to prevent early childbirth
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/3/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... May 03, 2016 , ... ProIntro ... Final Cut Pro X. Pixel Film Studios’ titles allow users to add a terrifying ... basic elements such as boxes, lines and accents. To add greater contrast, all the ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... ... Sue Desmond-Hellmann, chief executive officer of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, will call ... keynote address at Georgia State University’s spring commencement on Saturday, May 7 ... a scientist, physician and executive, Desmond-Hellmann leads the Gates Foundation’s efforts to help more ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... 03, 2016 , ... Calvary Hospital recently hosted a reception to mark a ... unit located at Mary, Manning Walsh Home (MMW) in Manhattan. , During the ... half an hour, once a week. The music brings a lot of joy to ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... May 03, 2016 , ... Horizon Blue ... been honored as one of the nation’s most accomplished business technology innovators by ... received the recognition for technology achievements that have enabled the delivery of the ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... FL (PRWEB) , ... May 03, 2016 , ... ... leading innovative specialty pharmacies, will be represented at the 2016 Asembia Specialty ... Vegas. The Asembia Summit is the largest U.S. health care conference for the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/3/2016)... May 3, 2016 Intec Pharma ... clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company, today announced the appointment of ... Affairs. "Ms. Strauss-Levy has 15 years of ... established an outstanding track record, having supported the advancement ... approval processes in the United States ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... -- Leading Economies with Fastest Real GDP Annual Percentage Change, 2015  ... Ireland 7.8 India 7.3, , Source: IMF and TechSci Research ... of Brazil , Russia , ... , registered the fastest GDP growth during the first decade of the ... recession in Brazil and Russia , ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... COUNTY, Calif. , April 29, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... industry is projected to shift from systems dependent ... replace all types of modality CRT Medical monitors ... Although there are a host of foreseeable benefits ... serious concern; will existing modalities have to be ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: