Navigation Links
Vanderbilt study examines Affordable Care Act's impact on uncompensated care
Date:12/27/2012

Nashville (Tenn.) - The decision by several states not to expand Medicaid health insurance for the poor may create unintended cuts for hospitals that provide uncompensated care, according to a study by John Graves, Ph.D., a Vanderbilt policy expert in the Department of Preventive Medicine.

Graves used financial data from U.S. hospitals and insurance data in each state to predict cuts in Medicare and Medicaid disproportionate share (DSH) funds paid to the nearly three-fourths of U.S. hospitals that serve low-income patients. The results, published in the Dec. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, put numbers behind the impact of funding changes and predict what the difference would be if Medicaid is, or is not, expanded in each state.

"Expanded insurance through the exchanges alone will trigger lower DSH payments to hospitals," Graves said. "The problem comes in states where much of the uncompensated care provided will remain the same if Medicaid is not expanded, yet DSH cuts will still occur. Hospitals will need to recoup these DSH losses either by providing less uncompensated care, or by shifting the costs onto everyone else."

As planned under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Medicare DSH cuts will begin with a 75 percent across-the-board reduction in 2014 as new insurance exchanges come on line across the country. To reduce the impact of the cuts, the government has devised a calculation to add some DSH funds back, based on the proportion of citizens who are uninsured in each state. But because of the Supreme Court determination that states could not be compelled to expand Medicaid, who becomes covered in each state will vary widely.

Graves found that some states that do not expand Medicaid will be offering coverage to a greater number of people in their insurance exchanges, while continuing to leave most low-income, uninsured people without coverage. DSH cuts will still move forward in those states, placing a burden on hospitals that provide the most uncompensated care.

On the flip side, Graves found states that are planning to expand Medicaid coverage could end up covering as much as 60 percent of their uninsured citizens, significantly increasing the amount of hospital care covered by public and private insurers and offsetting the reduction in DSH funds.

Graves said of the top five states his calculations show will experience the most unintended DSH reductions, three Texas, Louisiana and Florida have already announced they will not expand Medicaid.

The federal government has set no time limit on states opting in or out of Medicaid expansions, but DSH cuts are currently set to begin in 2014.


'/>"/>

Contact: Carole Bartoo
carole.bartoo@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Vanderbilt study finds diverse genetic alterations in triple-negative breast cancers
2. UNC, Vanderbilt discover a new live vaccine approach for SARS and novel coronaviruses
3. Vanderbilt study looks at benefits of progestogens to prevent early childbirth
4. Vanderbilt-led study reveals racial disparities in prostate cancer care
5. Vanderbilt researchers find proteins may point way to new prostate cancer drug targets
6. Vanderbilt study finds obesity linked to kidney injury after heart surgery
7. Cancer-Related Fatigue Often Overlooked, Study Finds
8. Fibromyalgia Diagnosis Often Missed in Men: Study
9. Males Struck by Cars Die More Often Than Females: Study
10. U.S. Cancer Screening Rates Dropping: Study
11. Ability to metabolize tamoxifen affects breast cancer outcomes, Mayo Clinic-led study confirms
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/26/2017)... ... 26, 2017 , ... IndustryArchive.Org . is announcing a new way for ... will now only pay for B.A.N.T. quality sales leads based on the Sellers decision ... the new reality that B2B buyers are controlling the sales process via the Internet ...
(Date:2/26/2017)... , ... February 26, 2017 , ... ... disease (PD) in persons with a specific LRRK2 mutation, according to a study ... Previous studies have provided evidence of a link between pesticides and incidence of ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... Only two months after the official ... (ILTM) show in Cannes (France), XO Private has initiated a second print-run of its ... measures almost a metre across when open, weighs in at more than six kilos, ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... 24, 2017 , ... The Smart Machine Age is here, and it’s disrupting ... percent of all jobs in the United States may be taken over by technology ... the aggressive know-it-all who steamrolls over colleagues is drawing to a close. Success will ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... Australia (PRWEB) , ... February 24, 2017 , ... The ... AU) offers Erik Schanssema ’s true account of his paramedic experiences. Schanssema describes ... stress disorder and his attempts to overcome them. , Schanssema, initially unsure of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/23/2017)... REDWOOD CITY, Calif., Feb. 23, 2017 Nevro Corp. ... innovative evidence-based solutions for the treatment of chronic pain, today ... ended December 31, 2016. 2016 Accomplishment & ... the full year 2016, an increase of 228% as reported, ... million for 2016, an increase of 612% over the prior ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... 23, 2017 Research and Markets has announced ... Strategies - 2016" report to their offering. ... The latest research Oesophageal Cancer ... and benchmarks in the global Oesophageal Cancer market. The ... are the key drugs marketed for Oesophageal Cancer and their clinical ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... , Feb. 23, 2017 Regulus ... the discovery and development of innovative medicines targeting microRNAs, ... year 2016 financial results on Thursday, March 2, 2017 ... a conference call and webcast on March 2, 2017 ... and full year 2016 financial results and provide a ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: