Navigation Links
Vaccine Shows Promise Against Mosquito-Borne Virus
Date:8/15/2014

By
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Aug. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental vaccine to protect people from the mosquito-borne chikungunya virus has shown promise in its first human trial.

"This vaccine was safe and well-tolerated, and we believe that this vaccine makes a type of antibody that is effective against chikungunya," said trial leader Dr. Julie Ledgerwood, chief of the clinical trials program at the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Currently, there are no vaccines or drugs to treat this debilitating infection, which causes fever and intensely painful, severe arthritis.

Chikungunya has spread from its origins in Africa to Asia and the Caribbean, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Last month, the first U.S. cases were reported in Florida, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The new report was published online Aug. 15 in The Lancet.

Ledgerwood said the next step is to test the vaccine in more people and more age groups. The current study looked at 25 people who were between the ages of 18 and 50. The vaccine also needs to be tested in populations where the virus is endemic, to see if it really prevents people from getting the disease, she added.

Testing will take more than five years before a vaccine could be offered to the public, however, Ledgerwood said. Should the vaccine prove safe and effective, it could be given to people living in areas where chikungunya is endemic and also to travelers and military personnel going to those places, she said.

"In areas where this virus is active, people feel the need for the vaccine is great," Ledgerwood said.

Chikungunya (pronounced chick-en-gun-ye) virus causes high fevers, joint pain and swelling, headaches and a rash. For some people, the pain can last even after other symptoms disappear, and in rare cases it can be fatal, the CDC said.

Ann Powers, a CDC research microbiologist and author of an editorial in the same journal, said, "There are a number of approaches going on with chikungunya vaccine, and I am excited to see one is moving forward in clinical trials."

Powers added that in areas like India, where chikungunya is endemic, a vaccine has been needed for years. "Now that chikungunya is in the Western Hemisphere, there is no reason not to suspect it won't be endemic in Central or South America," she said.

And as more cases show up in the southern United States, it is likely that local outbreaks will increase, Powers said. "Given the ability of mosquitos to transmit the virus, we could see outbreaks in other areas of the country," she said.

There may even come a time when the vaccine will be needed in the United States, Powers added.

"That's an absolute possibility. We don't anticipate right now that would be a huge necessity, but since this is a new virus coming into a new ecology we would have to keep the possibility open that something could change and we would have to think seriously about broader distribution of the vaccine," she said.

Powers said that chikungunya isn't the only virus people need to worry about. "Chikungunya is just one example. There are somewhere around 550 different mosquito-transmitted viruses. We have to be aware that there are more things that will be coming, and we need to be prepared for them," she said.

In this phase 1 trial, the vaccine was given in different doses to 25 healthy volunteers. To determine the effectiveness and safety of the vaccine, researchers measured at regular intervals the amount of antibodies produced against chikungunya in the participants.

The investigators found that, after the first shot, even the lowest dose produced antibodies in most patients. After a second shot, all the participants developed high amounts of antibodies. These antibodies were long-lasting and were detected six months after the last vaccination, Ledgerwood said.

The vaccine was also well-tolerated with no serious side effects, she said. Four volunteers reported mild to moderate side effects, including an increase in an enzyme in liver and heart cells that rises when these organs are damaged, and a low white blood cell count that leaves people vulnerable to infections, the researchers noted.

After 11 months, the levels of antibodies were similar to those found in people who had been infected with chikungunya, which suggests that the vaccine might protect people over the long haul, Ledgerwood said.

In addition, the vaccine made antibodies against multiple types of the virus, so it might be effective against any strain of chikungunya, she noted.

More information

Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for more on chikungunya.

SOURCES: Julie Ledgerwood, D.O., chief, clinical trials program, U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Ann Powers, Ph.D., research microbiologist, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Aug. 15, 2014, The Lancet, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2014 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Study Suggests Vaccine May Help Kids With Brain Cancer
2. Young girls more likely to report side effects after HPV vaccine
3. Preteens More Likely to Report HPV Vaccine Side Effects
4. Vaccine yielded encouraging long-term survival rates in certain patients with NSCLC
5. Early Study Finds Some Promise for Lung Cancer Vaccine
6. From a Failed Vaccine, New Insights Into Fighting HIV
7. From herd immunity and complacency to group panic: How vaccine scares unfold
8. Brain Tumor Vaccine Shows Promise in Early Trial
9. Army researcher develops potential vaccine carrier
10. A physicians guide for anti-vaccine parents
11. Shingles Vaccine Safe, Underutilized, Study Says
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Vaccine Shows Promise Against Mosquito-Borne Virus 
(Date:2/17/2017)... Rancho Palos Verdes, CA (PRWEB) , ... February ... ... well-being, and emotional flow is Dr. Carol Francis' goals for each ... Federation Retreat Conference, Dr. Carol Francis will demonstrate five different brainwave tools which ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... ... February 17, 2017 , ... ... announced today that Karen Pilley has been promoted to Chief Executive Officer. ... shifting healthcare paradigm – a shift that demands the transition from pay-for-service to ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Top neuroendocrine cancer doctors, nurses and specialists from around the ... - 23 in Beaver Creek, CO. It was announced today by Cindy Lovelace, executive ... Beaver Creek, hosting over 60 faculty members and addressing unmet needs of the NET ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... ... February 17, 2017 , ... Teaching nursing care of vulnerable children is the ... (pediatrics) is being created with the support of the Hearst Foundations. An initiative of ... will address what has been identified as a critical gap in preparing the next ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... ... 16, 2017 , ... The field of hair restoration includes a variety of ... of Parsa Mohebi Hair Restoration, is trained in performing these treatments and techniques on ... he recently expanded the information content on the blog section of his ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/17/2017)... YORK , Feb. 17, 2017   Risperdal ... side effects allegedly associated with use of the atypical ... Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, where ... mass tort program. According to a notice posted on ... to convene a meeting on March 9, 2017 at ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... 17, 2017 On Thursday, February ... edged lower at the closing bell, while the Dow ... 20,000 benchmark. Moreover, five out of nine sectors ended ... yesterday,s market sentiment, Stock-Callers.com assessed the following Medical Appliances ... (NYSE: SNN ), ABIOMED Inc. (NASDAQ: ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... Inc. (NYSE: DVA ) today announced results for ... Net income attributable to DaVita Inc. for the quarter ... $0.80 per share and $880 million, or $4.29 per share, ... Inc. for the quarter and year ended December 31, 2016, ... $0.98 per share, and $789 million, or $3.85 per share, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: