Navigation Links
UofL scientists uncover how grapefruits provide a secret weapon in medical drug delivery
Date:5/21/2013

LOUISVILLE, Ky. Grapefruits have long been known for their health benefits, and the subtropical fruit may revolutionize how medical therapies like anti-cancer drugs are delivered to specific tumor cells.

University of Louisville researchers have uncovered how to create nanoparticles using natural lipids derived from grapefruit, and have discovered how to use them as drug delivery vehicles. UofL scientists Huang-Ge Zhang, D.V.M., Ph.D., Qilong Wang, Ph.D., and their team today (May 21, 2013), published their findings in Nature Communications.

"These nanoparticles, which we've named grapefruit-derived nanovectors (GNVs), are derived from an edible plant, and we believe they are less toxic for patients, result in less biohazardous waste for the environment, and are much cheaper to produce at large scale than nanoparticles made from synthetic materials," Zhang said.

The researchers demonstrated that GNVs can transport various therapeutic agents, including anti-cancer drugs, DNA/RNA and proteins such as antibodies. Treatment of animals with GNVs seemed to cause less adverse effects than treatment with drugs encapsulated in synthetic lipids.

"Our GNVs can be modified to target specific cells we can use them like missiles to carry a variety of therapeutic agents for the purpose of destroying diseased cells," he said. "Furthermore, we can do this at an affordable price."

The therapeutic potential of grapefruit derived nanoparticles was further validated through a Phase 1 clinical trial for treatment of colon cancer patients. So far, researchers have observed no toxicity in the patients who orally took the anti-inflammatory agent curcumin encapsulated in grapefruit nanoparticles.

The UofL scientists also plan to test whether this technology can be applied in the treatment of inflammation related autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.

A Common Sense Approach

Zhang said he began this research by considering how our ancestors selected food to eat.

"The fruits and vegetables we buy from the grocery today were passed down from generation to generation as favorable and nutritious for the human body. On the flip side, outcomes were not favorable for our ancestors who ate poisonous mushrooms, for example," he said. "It made sense for us to consider eatable plants as a mechanism to create medical nanoparticles as a potential non-toxic therapeutic delivery vehicle."

In addition to grapefruit, Zhang and his team analyzed the nanoparticles from tomatoes and grapes. Grapefruits were chosen for further exploration because a larger quantity of lipids can be derived from this fruit.


'/>"/>

Contact: Julie Heflin
julie.heflin@louisville.edu
502-852-7987
University of Louisville
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Most scientists agree: Humans are causing climate change
2. Scientists Use Cloning Technique to Produce Human Stem Cells
3. Brain rewires itself after damage or injury, life scientists discover
4. Queens scientists develop magic bullet nanomedicine for Acute Lung Injury
5. Scientists Discover More Genetic Clues to Testicular Cancer
6. Advocacy Group Awards $300,000 to Young Scientists in Search of a Cure for Bladder Cancer
7. Scientists define a new mechanism leading to tumor hypoxia
8. Scientists Explore Secrets of the Well-Hit Fastball
9. Monell scientists identify critical link in mammalian odor detection
10. Duke scientists build a living patch for damaged hearts
11. Scientists revolutionize the creation of genetically altered mice to model human disease
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/27/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... February 27, 2017 , ... ... for hair transplantation therapy, is proud to announce a new informational post on ... therapy procedures. Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) hair transplant and Follicular Unit Transplantation (FUT) ...
(Date:2/26/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... February 26, 2017 , ... ... in 2011 the lab became the world’s first to be ISO/IEC 17025:2005 INAB ... (cat allergen) analysis. , ISO/IEC 17025:2005 is the globally recognised standard that sets ...
(Date:2/26/2017)... ... February 26, 2017 , ... ODH, Inc.™ announced today ... 27-28 at the Sheraton Pentagon City Hotel in Arlington, VA. ODH’s director of medical ... behavioral health analytics to improve Medicaid population health management. , ODH will also have ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Houston dentist , Dr. Behzad Nazari, ... Center. Currently, patients can get single dental implants for $3,599 and All On ... more about these offers by contacting Antoine Dental Center. Both of these options ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... ... The Smart Machine Age is here, and it’s disrupting everything. Not only ... jobs in the United States may be taken over by technology in the next ... who steamrolls over colleagues is drawing to a close. Success will belong to those ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/27/2017)... -- Leading Countries, Technologies and Companies ... at a CAGR of 8.9% from 2016-2021 and CAGR of 9.2% ... of 9.1% from 2016 to 2027. The market is estimated at ... ... Read on to discover how you can exploit the future business ...
(Date:2/27/2017)... Israel , Feb. 27, 2017 ... of adult stem cell technologies for neurodegenerative diseases, announced ... M.D., Ph.D., FACP, and Arturo O. Araya , ... "Dr. Almenoff and Mr. Araya are talented and ... time for our company," said Chaim Lebovits , ...
(Date:2/27/2017)... , Feb 27, 2017 The ... by NATO for use at the security level RESTRICTED. The ... the NATO organization for the communication of classified information. ... Sectra and ... with an eavesdrop-secure smartphone solution. Sectra Tiger/R is developed by ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: