Navigation Links
University of Maryland study: Neonatal heart stem cells may help mend kids' broken hearts
Date:9/10/2012

Baltimore, MD September 10, 2012 Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, who are exploring novel ways to treat serious heart problems in children, have conducted the first direct comparison of the regenerative abilities of neonatal and adult-derived human cardiac stem cells. Among their findings: cardiac stem cells (CSCs) from newborns have a three-fold ability to restore heart function to nearly normal levels compared with adult CSCs. Further, in animal models of heart attack, hearts treated with neonatal stem cells pumped stronger than those given adult cells. The study is published in the September 11, 2012, issue of Circulation.

"The surprising finding is that the cells from neonates are extremely regenerative and perform better than adult stem cells," says the study's senor author, Sunjay Kaushal, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director, pediatric cardiac surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center. "We are extremely excited and hopeful that this new cell-based therapy can play an important role in the treatment of children with congenital heart disease, many of whom don't have other options."

Dr. Kaushal envisions cellular therapy as either a stand-alone therapy for children with heart failure or an adjunct to medical and surgical treatments. While surgery can provide structural relief for some patients with congenital heart disease and medicine can boost heart function up to two percent, he says cellular therapy may improve heart function even more dramatically. "We're looking at this type of therapy to improve heart function in children by 10, 12, or 15 percent. This will be a quantum leap in heart function improvement."

Heart failure in children, as in adults, has been on the rise in the past decade and the prognosis for patients hospitalized with heart failure remains poor. In contrast to adults, Dr. Kaushal says heart failure in children is typically the result of a constellation of problems: reduced cardiac blood flow; weakening and enlargement of the heart; and various congenital malformations. Recent research has shown that several types of cardiac stem cells can help the heart repair itself, essentially reversing the theory that a broken heart cannot be mended.

Stem cells are unspecialized cells that can become tissue- or organ-specific cells with a particular function. In a process called differentiation, cardiac stem cells may develop into rhythmically contracting muscle cells, smooth muscle cells or endothelial cells. Stem cells in the heart may also secrete growth factors conducive to forming heart muscle and keeping the muscle from dying.

To conduct the study, researchers obtained a small amount of heart tissue during normal cardiac surgery from 43 neonates and 13 adults. The cells were expanded in a growth medium yielding millions of cells. The researchers developed a consistent way to isolate and grow neonatal stem cells from as little as 20 milligrams of heart tissue. Adult and neonate stem cell activity was observed both in the laboratory and in animal models. In addition, the animal models were compared to controls that were not given the stem cells.

Dr. Kaushal says it is not clear why the neonatal stem cells performed so well. One explanation hinges on sheer numbers: there are many more stem cells in a baby's heart than in the adult heart. Another explanation: neonate-derived cells release more growth factors that trigger blood vessel development and/or preservation than adult cells.

"This research provides an important link in our quest to understand how stem cells function and how they can best be applied to cure disease and correct medical deficiencies," says E. Albert Reece, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A., vice president for medical affairs, University of Maryland; the John Z. and Akiko K. Bowers Distinguished Professor; and dean, University of Maryland School of Medicine. "Sometimes simple science is the best science. In this case, a basic, comparative study has revealed in stark terms the powerful regenerative qualities of neonatal cardiac stem cells, heretofore unknown."

Insights gained through this research may provide new treatment options for a life-threatening congenital heart syndrome called hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Dr. Kaushal and his team will soon begin the first clinical trial in the United States to determine whether the damage to hearts of babies with HLHS can be reversed with stem cell therapy. HLHS limits the heart's ability to pump blood from the left side of the heart to the body. Current treatment options include either a heart transplant or a series of reconstructive surgical procedures. Nevertheless, only 50-60 percent of children who have had those procedures survive to age five.

According to the American Heart Association, congenital heart disease may affect approximately one in 100 children. In the United States, more than 1 million adults are living with congenital heart defects.


'/>"/>

Contact: Bill Seiler
bseiler@umm.edu
410-328-8919
University of Maryland Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Aarhus University to inaugurate the ultimate source of light:
2. Multi-functional anti-inflammatory/anti-allergic developed by Hebrew University researcher
3. University of Hawaii cancer researchers discover gene defect responsible for cancer syndrome
4. Oxford University Press acquires American Journal of Hypertension
5. Queens University Belfast wins national environment award
6. Non-invasive treatment for children with obstructive sleep apnea suggested by Ben-Gurion University study
7. University of Colorado Cancer Center earns major grant to develop new bladder cancer drugs
8. Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania selected to lead US nurse-training initiative
9. University of Pennsylvania and Novartis form alliance to expand use of personalized T cell cancer therapy
10. Boston University researchers expand synthetic biologys toolkit
11. Canadians super-sizing Canadas Food Guide servings: York University study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/25/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... April 25, ... ... based in Newport Beach, California, committed to raising awareness for Duchenne muscular ... results from its randomized CAP-1002 (cardiosphere-derived cells) Phase I/II HOPE clinical trial ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... As President Trump challenges ... for how his administration could impact the employee benefits industry. James Slotnick, AVP, ... most likely to make it through Congress. His discussion will focus on the ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... The doctors at Wall Centre Dental ... with dental fear and require sedation to receive dental care. The doctors offer three ... procedures, from hygienic cleanings to oral surgery, at their dental office in Vancouver. Wall ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... Patients who would like ... in a fraction of the time as traditional braces – Wilckodontics®. Dr. Victoria ... now offers this revolutionary treatment with or without a referral. , Wilckodontics ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... ... in unveiling cutting-edge birth defects research related to Zika virus during pregnancy, as ... premier society for this important science. , The Teratology Society ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/19/2017)... 2017 Companion animal ... in pets such as canine, avian and feline. ... types such as Attenuated Live Vaccines, Conjugate Vaccines, ... and Recombinant Vaccines. Attenuated live vaccines are derived ... which have been weakend under laboratory conditions. Conjugate ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... , April 19, 2017  SARES•REGIS Group leased ... is developing at Conejo Spectrum Business Park in ... Atara Biotherapeutics, Inc. , a biopharmaceutical company ... life-threatening diseases that have been underserved by scientific ... therapies for cancer, autoimmune and infectious disease. ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... , April 18, 2017 Viverae ® , ... announce the integration of IBM ® Watson Campaign ... deliver targeted communications for a personalized experience. Through digital ... on their health in real time. The enhanced experience ... most to members, wherever they are in their journey ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: