Navigation Links
Undertreatment of common heart condition persists despite rapid adoption of novel therapies
Date:9/21/2012

A novel blood thinner recently approved by the FDA, dabigatran (Pradaxa), has been rapidly adopted into clinical practice, yet thus far has had little impact on improving treatment rates for atrial fibrillation. This is according to a new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health that examined national trends in oral anticoagulant use. They found that despite rapid adoption of dabigatran for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, a large proportion of patientstwo in fivedid not receive oral anticoagulant therapy. In addition, although the majority of dabigatran utilization was for its FDA-approved indication, atrial fibrillation, an increasing proportion of use was for off-label indications such as venous thromboembolism. The results are featured in the September 2012 issue of Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

"Dabigatran has been briskly adopted into clinical practice since its October 2010 Food and Drug Administration approval for the prevention of stroke among patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation," said G. Caleb Alexander, MD, MS, lead author of the study and a research scientist in the Bloomberg School's Department of Epidemiology. "Between 2007 and 2011, use of the oral anticoagulant warfarin declined from approximately 2.1 million quarterly physician visits to approximately 1.6 million visits while since its release, dabigatran use increased from 3.1 percent to 18.9 percent of physician visits where an oral anticoagulant was used."

Using data from the IMS National Disease and Therapeutic Index, a nationally representative audit of ambulatory providers, Alexander and colleagues quantified patterns of oral anticoagulant use among subjects between 2007 and 2011. Focusing on the oral anticoagulant drugs, dabigatran and warfarin, they examined treatment patterns by patient age, provider specialty and common indications for oral anticoagulation. Pharmacy expenditures for warfarin and dabigatran were quantified using a nationally representative audit of retail, mail order and long-term care pharmacies.

According to the National Institutes of Health, atrial fibrillation is the most common type of arrhythmia and, compared with their counterparts, patients with atrial fibrillation have an increased risk of stroke. Previous research has indicated the use of oral anticoagulants may reduce the risk of thromboembolic events like stroke by up to two-thirds and is especially vital in the prevention of such events among high-risk individuals.

The authors conclude that, "a better understanding of how these therapies are being applied in the real world is an important step in understanding their potential to ultimately improve care."


'/>"/>

Contact: Natalie Wood-Wright
nwoodwri@jhsph.edu
410-614-6029
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Texting in College Classrooms Common, Distracting
2. Recovery from propofol anesthesia may be sped by use of common stimulant
3. Long-term neuropsychological impairment is common in acute lung injury survivors
4. Overuse Injuries Common Among Female College Athletes
5. Common Blood Pressure Drug Safe for Heart Failure: Study
6. Test links strains of common parasite to severe illness in US newborns
7. Common Plastics Chemical Might Boost Diabetes Risk
8. Off-Label Drug Use Appears Common
9. Global, common approach to pharmaceutical supply chain integrity the focus of workshop
10. Slow-growing babies more likely in normal-weight women; Less common in obese pregnancies
11. Common Blood Pressure Drugs May Not Cut Colon Cancer Risk
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Mystic Buddha Publishing House ... Blue SKies Buddha, the biography of Rama - Dr. Frederick Lenz. , ... the love of a Buddhist teacher for teaching and helping others. Valentine’s Day ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... 12, 2016 , ... CDRH Enforcement Trends: , Back to the Future , Feb. 25, 2016 ... Winston Churchill said, “Those who don’t learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” , ... come knocking this year. But that takes time. , Take a close look at ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Coco Libre, the maker ... Red Carpet Events LA GRAMMY’s Style Lounge Event. Coco Libre will offer musicians and ... hydrated before the big event. The invitation-only gifting suite, held this year at the ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Every winter, someone is killed, ... the West Penn Burn Center, part of the Allegheny Health Network, has ... bring you the “Space Heaters Need Space” campaign. , “Space Heaters Need ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 , ... Vail knee ... Industry Physician Leaders to Know in 2016 . The list consists of physicians establishing, ... physicians to establish this list. , An Ambulatory Surgery Center, also known as ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/12/2016)... , February 12, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... nicht anders vermerkt)   http://www.sedar.com ... http://www.telestatherapeutics.com abrufbar.    --> ... des Unternehmens http://www.telestatherapeutics.com abrufbar.    ... (TSX:TST; PNK:BNHLF) veröffentlichte heute seinen Konzernabschluss des ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... , Feb. 12, 2016  SI-BONE, Inc., a medical device company ... ("iFuse"), a minimally invasive surgical (MIS) device indicated for fusion for ... Services, Inc. (NGS), the Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) covering the states ... Maine , Massachusetts , ... New York , Rhode Island , ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... , Feb. 12, 2016  Memorial Hermann Health System ... Dwight Howard to bring a one-of-a-kind experience to ... Using cutting-edge technologies such as 360-degree video and Google ... virtually, then literally – giving the patients and their ... it was all caught on video . ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: