Navigation Links
USC study finds evidence of gender-related differences in development of colon cancer

Los Angeles, April 15, 2008 -- A new study by researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) has found evidence that supports gender-related differences in the development and survival of metastatic colon cancer.

The study, which will be published in the April 15 issue of the journal Cancer Research, found that specific gene variants linked to the development of colon cancer resulted in opposite survival outcomes for men and women.

Germline variations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) DNA -- a gene widely expressed in colonic tissue -- has been linked with poor prognosis in colon cancer, says Oliver Press, an M.D. student at the Keck School of Medicine of USC and lead author of the study. However, when researchers looked at EGFR as a prognostic factor, they found that it had opposite implications for men and women.

"We expected to find that high expression would correlate with a poor prognosis and faster growth of the cancer," says Press. "What we found was that men followed the expected trend, while women's response was the opposite."

Researchers analyzed 318 patients -- 177 men and 141 women -- with metastatic colon cancer treated at the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center and the LAC+USC Medical Center between 1992 and 2003. All the patients were exposed to similar chemotherapy treatments. When genomic DNA samples were analyzed, researchers found that women who had specific gene variants linked with high expression of EGFR had higher overall survival rates, while men with the same variants had lower survival.

"This is the first report to show that the prognostic value of EGFR depends on gender," says Heinz-Josef Lenz, M.D., professor of medicine at the Keck School of Medicine and the principal investigator on the study. "This may suggest that, in the future, molecular markers should be evaluated differently in women and men and that treatment decisions may depend on gender and not only on molecular or clinical findings."

Previous research has shown a protective effect of female hormones in colon cancer survival, Press notes. The findings of the study indicate that hormone receptors are important to signal pathways related to the survival of patients.

The study is an important jumping off point to further research into how men and women differ in response to specific treatments, he says.

"Research will need to be done to determine whether women and men respond differently to certain cancer therapies," Press says. "Down the road we may see targeted chemotherapy that is tailored to get the best response from male and female patients."


Contact: Meghan Lewit
University of Southern California

Related medicine news :

1. New study in JCSM finds that obesity can predict upper airway obstruction amongst children
2. Study shows increase of hip and knee replacements in the US
3. Study shows decline in work disability due to rheumatoid arthritis
4. Study details cost-effectiveness of rheumatoid arthritis treatments for Medicare recipients
5. Study sheds light on deadly lung disease
6. NovoCure presents results from breast cancer pilot study
7. Mayo-led study finds smoking related to subset of colorectal cancers
8. National hospice study reveals gaps in service
9. Study Points to New Treatments for Polycystic Kidney Disease
10. MRI better than MDCT in detecting endoleaks, study says
11. Personality study shows risk of first depression episode late in life
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... ActivePDF, a ... PDF automation tool to batch conversions of CAD drawings, plans, and diagrams ... fidelity. , CADConverter eliminates the complexity requirement of specialized applications to view CAD ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... the world’s first commercially-available next-generation sequencing laboratory test for bacterial vaginosis- a ... and Obstetrics in Vancouver, BC, Canada. , In a presentation entitled: ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... biannual Heroes in Recovery Awards at Foundations Recovery Network’s Moments of Change conference ... the one-of-a-kind awards to Noah Levine and Dean Dauphinais who exemplify the ideals ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... CA (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2015 , ... According to an article ... data from adults today versus those of a similar group taken in 1988 has shown ... that a person in 2008 with the same diet as someone in 1971 would be ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... ... October 12, 2015 , ... Amerec , a leader in ... and skin care equipment, will be displaying custom sauna and steam room solutions at ... high-end resorts and spas as customers, SpaEquip is recognized for their ability to assist ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2015)... Oct. 12, 2015  CME Group,s Center for Innovation ... CEO of Theranos, is the 11 th recipient of ... the revolutionary blood diagnostics company, Theranos , to change ... in a new era of preventive care. CME Group will ... Leadership Conference in Naples, Florida , ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... , October 12, 2015 ... - Pipeline Review, H2 2015 market research report ... R&D pipelines by identifying new targets and MOAs ... . --> ... pipeline spread across 62 pages, analyzing 6 companies, ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... VALLEY COTTAGE, New York , October 12, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... Market Insights (FMI) delivers key insights on the global vital ... Signs Monitoring Devices Market: Global Industry Analysis and Opportunity Assessment ... to expand at a healthy CAGR of 9.5% and 9.2% ... period, due to factors, regarding which FMI offers major insights ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: