Navigation Links
USC study finds evidence of gender-related differences in development of colon cancer
Date:4/15/2008

Los Angeles, April 15, 2008 -- A new study by researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) has found evidence that supports gender-related differences in the development and survival of metastatic colon cancer.

The study, which will be published in the April 15 issue of the journal Cancer Research, found that specific gene variants linked to the development of colon cancer resulted in opposite survival outcomes for men and women.

Germline variations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) DNA -- a gene widely expressed in colonic tissue -- has been linked with poor prognosis in colon cancer, says Oliver Press, an M.D. student at the Keck School of Medicine of USC and lead author of the study. However, when researchers looked at EGFR as a prognostic factor, they found that it had opposite implications for men and women.

"We expected to find that high expression would correlate with a poor prognosis and faster growth of the cancer," says Press. "What we found was that men followed the expected trend, while women's response was the opposite."

Researchers analyzed 318 patients -- 177 men and 141 women -- with metastatic colon cancer treated at the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center and the LAC+USC Medical Center between 1992 and 2003. All the patients were exposed to similar chemotherapy treatments. When genomic DNA samples were analyzed, researchers found that women who had specific gene variants linked with high expression of EGFR had higher overall survival rates, while men with the same variants had lower survival.

"This is the first report to show that the prognostic value of EGFR depends on gender," says Heinz-Josef Lenz, M.D., professor of medicine at the Keck School of Medicine and the principal investigator on the study. "This may suggest that, in the future, molecular markers should be evaluated differently in women and men and that treatment decisions may depend on gender and not only on molecular or clinical findings."

Previous research has shown a protective effect of female hormones in colon cancer survival, Press notes. The findings of the study indicate that hormone receptors are important to signal pathways related to the survival of patients.

The study is an important jumping off point to further research into how men and women differ in response to specific treatments, he says.

"Research will need to be done to determine whether women and men respond differently to certain cancer therapies," Press says. "Down the road we may see targeted chemotherapy that is tailored to get the best response from male and female patients."


'/>"/>

Contact: Meghan Lewit
lewit@usc.edu
323-442-3576
University of Southern California
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. New study in JCSM finds that obesity can predict upper airway obstruction amongst children
2. Study shows increase of hip and knee replacements in the US
3. Study shows decline in work disability due to rheumatoid arthritis
4. Study details cost-effectiveness of rheumatoid arthritis treatments for Medicare recipients
5. Study sheds light on deadly lung disease
6. NovoCure presents results from breast cancer pilot study
7. Mayo-led study finds smoking related to subset of colorectal cancers
8. National hospice study reveals gaps in service
9. Study Points to New Treatments for Polycystic Kidney Disease
10. MRI better than MDCT in detecting endoleaks, study says
11. Personality study shows risk of first depression episode late in life
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... ... Delaware farmer Rick Dickerson attended the 2017 Soybean Leadership College ... a thousand acres of soybeans, corn and wheat, and raises peas, sweet corn, baby ... for the fresh market. He also operates a roadside stand and raises broilers for ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... FORT LAUDERDALE, FL (PRWEB) , ... January 18, ... ... and how to manage it from the number one doctor-recommended OTC antiperspirant, Certain ... population and often go untreated. , Certain Dri created this infographic to explain ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... ARBOR, Mich. USA; SAN JOSE, Calif, USA; and SHANGHAI, China ... ... (PRWEB) January 18, 2017 -- Global public health ... to reduce arsenic V (pentavalent arsenic) to NSF/ANSI 53: Drinking ... for drinking water treatment units. This certification verifies that MicroCeramics’ ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... The V Foundation for Cancer Research, ... official endurance training and fundraising team, to compete in the Boston Marathon on April ... to finish the world’s oldest annual marathon to join Team V and support the ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... , ... January 18, 2017 , ... ... announce that their Vice President of Franchise Development, Paula Turner Pizarro, was recently ... business program, which features the insights of top business leaders from across the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... SUNNYVALE, Calif. , Jan. 19, 2017 ... that its CyberKnife® and TomoTherapy® Systems continue to set ... systems received the highest composite overall user satisfaction rating ... to the Q4 2016 MD Buyline Market Intelligence Briefing™. ... achieved the highest composite ratings among industry peers for ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... January 19, 2017 Shire plc ... the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has acknowledged ... Drug Application (NDA) for SHP465, a long-acting, triple-bead, mixed ... potential once-daily treatment for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The FDA ... June 20, 2017, the designated Prescription Drug User Fee ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... SAN FRANCISCO , January 19, 2017 The global  ... a new report by Grand View Research, Inc. The heightening prevalence of cardiac ... governing the growth of Pacemaker globally. In addition, technological enhancements in these devices ... Reading ... Grand View Research Logo ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: