Navigation Links
USC, Oxford researchers find high fructose corn syrup-global prevalence of diabetes link
Date:11/27/2012

LOS ANGELES AND OXFORD, U.K. A new study by University of Southern California (USC) and University of Oxford researchers indicates that large amounts of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in national food supplies across the world may be one explanation for the rising global epidemic of type 2 diabetes and resulting higher health care costs.

The study reports that countries that use HFCS in their food supply had a 20 percent higher prevalence of diabetes than countries that did not use HFCS. The analysis also revealed that HFCS's association with the "significantly increased prevalence of diabetes" occurred independent of total sugar intake and obesity levels.

The article, "High Fructose Corn Syrup and Diabetes Prevalence: A Global Perspective," is published in the journal Global Public Health.

"HFCS appears to pose a serious public health problem on a global scale," said principal study author Michael I. Goran, professor of preventive medicine, director of the Childhood Obesity Research Center and co-director of the Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute at the Keck School of Medicine at USC. "The study adds to a growing body of scientific literature that indicates HFCS consumption may result in negative health consequences distinct from and more deleterious than natural sugar."

The paper reports that out of 42 countries studied, the United States has the highest per capita consumption of HFCS at a rate of 25 kilograms, or 55 pounds, per year. The second highest is Hungary, with an annual rate of 16 kilograms, or 46 pounds, per capita. Canada, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Belgium, Argentina, Korea, Japan and Mexico are also relatively high HFCS consumers. Germany, Poland, Greece, Portugal, Egypt, Finland and Serbia are among the lowest HFCS consumers. Countries with per capita consumption of less than 0.5 kilogram per year include Australia, China, Denmark, France, India, Ireland, Italy, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and Uruguay.

Countries with higher use of HFCS had an average prevalence of type 2 diabetes of 8 percent compared to 6.7 percent in countries not using HFCS.

"This research suggests that HFCS can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, which is one of the most common causes of death in the world today," said study co-author Professor Stanley Ulijaszek, director of the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Oxford.

The article proposes that this link is probably driven by higher amounts of fructose in foods and beverages made with HFCS. Fructose and glucose are both found in ordinary sugar (sucrose) in equal amounts, but HFCS has a greater proportion of fructose. The higher fructose content makes HFCS sweeter and provides processed foods with greater stability and better appearance because of the more consistent browning color when foods made with higher fructose are baked.

In a previous related study, the authors found that the fructose content in some U.S.-produced soft drinks, especially the most popular, was about 20 percent higher than expected, suggesting that some manufacturers might be using HFCS with more fructose than previously estimated. Such differences could "potentially be driving up fructose consumption in countries that use HFCS," the researchers said. The study notes the difficulty in determining the actual amount of fructose in foods and beverages made with HFCS because of "a lack of industry disclosure on food labels."

Growing evidence reveals that the body metabolizes fructose differently from glucose. Among other things, fructose metabolism occurs independently of insulin, primarily in the liver where it may be readily converted to fat, which likely contributes to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition on the rise in Hispanics in the U.S. and Mexico.

"Most populations have an almost insatiable appetite for sweet foods, but regrettably our metabolism has not evolved sufficiently to be able to process the fructose from high fructose corn syrup in the quantities that some people are consuming it," said Ulijaszek. "Although this syrup can be found in many of our processed foods and drinks, this varies enormously from country to country."

The U.S. is the single largest consumer of high fructose corn syrup. By the late 1990s HFCS made up 40 percent of all caloric sweeteners and was the predominant sweetener in soft drinks sold in the U.S. However, since 2008, exports of HFCS from the U.S. to Mexico increased "exponentially" after trade restrictions were removed, the researchers said. They call for updated public health strategies requiring better labeling of fructose and HFCS content in processed foods.

To explain the varying degrees of HFCS consumption in the European Union, the researchers note that trade and agricultural policies set quotas for HFCS production, and while some countries, such as Sweden and the U.K., do not take their assigned quotas, other countries, such as Hungary and Slovakia, are able to purchase extra quotas from countries that do not accept them. The findings of the paper thus have important implications for global trade policies that may affect public health.

"If HFCS is a risk factor for diabetesone of the world's most serious chronic diseasesthen we need to rewrite national dietary guidelines and review agriculture trade polices," said Tim Lobstein, director of policy for the International Association for the Study of Obesity. "HFCS will join trans fats and salt as ingredients to avoid, and foods should carry warning labels."


'/>"/>
Contact: Leslie Ridgeway
lridgewa@usc.edu
323-442-2823
University of Southern California - Health Sciences
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Oxford University Press launches Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health
2. Oxford University Press acquires joint ownership of Journal of Surgical Case Reports
3. Oxford University Press acquires American Journal of Hypertension
4. NIH awards $20 million over 5 years to train next generation of global health researchers
5. Researchers develop a new cell and animal model of inflammatory breast cancer
6. Researchers uncover a viable way for colorectal cancer patients to overcome drug resistance
7. Researchers Find Gene Mutations That May Be a Key to Autism
8. Researchers find evidence of banned antibiotics in poultry products
9. NJ stroke researchers report advances in spatial neglect research at AAN Conference
10. Autism by the numbers: Yale researchers examine impact of new diagnostic criteria
11. Researchers Map Brain Regions Linked to Intelligence
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/30/2016)... Bay, Jamaica (PRWEB) , ... April 30, 2016 ... ... University, and Duane Boise, President and CEO of EMED, today signed a multifaceted ... Jamaica. , EMED and the Northern Caribbean University Department of Natural and Applied ...
(Date:4/30/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 30, 2016 , ... Orlando-based Maximized ... as they go for gold in Rio. Under the care of Maximized Living ... golds! , In an unprecedented showing, Maximized Living is sending the largest contingent of ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... 2016 , ... In an article published April 16th on the ... and lip injections, which she underwent in order to feel more at home at ... Festival. The article explains that Ms. Mirmelli’s situation is not unique; many plastic surgeons ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... , announces the addition Onnit brand Alpha BRAIN and New Mood Daily-Stress Formula ... brain and mood optimization products to the store is just one more way ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... California (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... at the heart of our nation’s productivity, stability, even security. Most importantly, employees ... their organizations. , Then why are American workers so unhappy? , Just under ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... SHAWNEE, Kan. , April 27, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... Martabano , a senior from the University of ... winner of the Bayer Excellence in Communication Award ... veterinary schools, which were awarded a total of ... Over the last four years, Bayer has provided ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... FRANCISCO , April 27, 2016 ... reach over USD 2.14 billion by 2022, according ... Inc.       (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150105/723757 ... technological advancement affecting the efficiency and accuracy delivered ... the persistent demand for novel urinalysis instruments and ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... April 26, 2016 Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: ... presentation at the Deutsche Bank 41 st Annual Health ... EDT. You are invited to listen to the ... or access it directly at http://edge.media-server.com/m/p/mr4uxgas . A recorded ... conclusion of the live event and accessible at the links ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: