Navigation Links
UR discovers new way to boost vaccines, seeks patent
Date:8/4/2010

As the medical community searches for better vaccines and ways to deliver them, a University of Rochester scientist believes he has discovered a new approach to boosting the body's response to vaccinations.

Richard P. Phipps, Ph.D., found that the same molecules used in drugs that treat diabetes also stimulate B cells in the immune system, pushing them to make antibodies for protection against invading microorganisms.

The University of Rochester Medical Center has applied for international patent protection for this discovery.

Phipps believes further research will show that low doses of insulin-sensitizing drugs might be useful as vaccine adjuvants, particularly for people with weakened immune systems who cannot produce a proper antibody response. This would include some infants, the elderly, and patients with chronic health problems that lower immunity.

Currently the only widely approved vaccine adjuvant in the United States is alum. A vaccine adjuvant is a substance added to a vaccine to improve the body's immune response. Various forms of aluminum salts have been used for 70 years. (Adjuvants are added to some vaccines but not all. For example, live viral vaccines given during childhood and seasonal flu vaccines do not contain adjuvants.)

"The search is always on for new adjuvants and safe adjuvants," said Phipps, a Dean's Professor of Environmental Medicine and professor of Medicine, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Microbology and Immunology, Pediatrics and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. "We are excited that we've identified a potentially important new and effective adjuvant."

Phipps' discovery grew from years of NIH-funded research investigating a protein called PPAR gamma and its ligands, which are present inside B cells and are involved in inflammation and in regulating the properties of immune cells and cancer cells. The way B cells evolve, or differentiate, is central to the body's immune response.

A closer examination of the role of PPAR gamma in relation to B cell function showed that PPAR levels increase upon B cell activation, according to a study published in 2009 by Phipps' laboratory in the Journal of Immunology.

Thus, researchers theorized that any molecule that binds to and activates PPAR gamma would, in turn, improve B cell secretion of antibodies. Researchers tested both natural and synthetic PPAR gamma ligands and discovered that the synthetic molecules used to create anti-diabetic drugs such as Actos and Avandia stimulated human and mouse B cells to better produce antibodies.

The drawback, Phipps said, is the possibility that too much stimulation would cause the immune system to overreact, triggering autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus. Additional research is needed to better understand this process.


'/>"/>

Contact: Leslie Orr
Leslie_Orr@urmc.rochester.edu
585-275-5774
University of Rochester Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Mount Sinai discovers bone marrow plays critical role in enhancing immune response to viruses
2. Professional Web Design Agency Discovers Winning Web Development Formula for Beating the Recession.
3. 28-Year Old from Texas Discovers His Own 'Instant Weight-Loss' Miracle Online
4. IU research team discovers TB disease mechanism and molecule to block it
5. High Cholesterol in Youth Boosts Heart Risk In Middle Age
6. Boosting the efficacy of anticancer vaccines
7. Calcium Supplements Linked to Boost in Heart Attack Risk
8. Vaccine Boosts Survival for Men With Advanced Prostate Cancer: Study
9. Radiation for Childhood Cancer Can Boost Risk of Stillbirth Later
10. Some on Statins May Not Need Boost in Good Cholesterol
11. NIH-funded study finds early HAART during TB treatment boosts survival rate in co-infected people
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/6/2016)... , ... December 06, 2016 , ... ... availability of the newly updated International Audit Protocol Consortium (IAPC) EHS audit protocol ... audit protocols to understand the scope of their EHS regulatory obligations and rapidly ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... 06, 2016 , ... U.S. Security Associates (USA) was named ... their industry leading training methods that engage their associates and link their achievements ... elite in employer-sponsored training and development programs. , “The 2017 Training Top 125 ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... , ... December 05, 2016 , ... ... its latest transitional care facility – Avamere Transitional Care of Puget Sound ... foot short-term, post-acute health care center will provide patients recovering from illness or ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... St. Petersburg, Fla. (PRWEB) , ... December 05, 2016 , ... ... effects concussions have on the growing brains of young athletes. Over the course of ... to the head through unique mouth guards. The mouth guards, equipped with special sensors, ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... ... December 05, 2016 , ... Physicians Education Resource®, ... International Congress on Hematologic Malignancies®: Focus on Leukemias, Lymphomas, and Myeloma, on February ... are honored to have Amy E. Herman present at this year’s conference, her ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/5/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of ... & Biochemical Research, Disease Diagnostics), End User (Academic & Research Institutes, ... to their offering. ... , The western blotting market ... 574.8 Million in 2016, growing at a CAGR of 4.9%. ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... 5, 2016   BIOTRONIK today announced the ... study evaluates the safety and feasibility of performing the ... setting. BioMonitor 2 is an insertable cardiac ... placed underneath a patient,s skin to help physicians accurately ... fibrillation is a leading cause of stroke and heart ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... Dec. 5, 2016  CVS Health, the nation,s largest ... a perfect score of 100 percent on the Corporate ... CEI is an annual national benchmarking survey and report ... administered by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation. ... that our colleagues, customers and suppliers bring to CVS ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: