Navigation Links
UNC research highlights at 2011 Digestive Disease Week

Digestive Disease Week (DDW) is the largest international gathering of physicians, researchers and academics in the fields of gastroenterology, hepatology, endoscopy and gastrointestinal surgery. Jointly sponsored by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract, DDW takes place May 7-10, at McCormick Place in Chicago, Ill. The meeting showcases approximately 5,000 abstracts and hundreds of lectures on the latest advances in GI research, medicine and technology.

The following are a selection of oral presentations given at this year's DDW by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine researchers.

1. Meditation offers relief for people with irritable bowel syndrome

This first-ever randomized controlled trial of the effect of mindfulness meditation training on irritable bowel syndrome found that the behavioral technique could significantly reduce the severity of symptoms. Dr. Olafur Palsson, associate professor of medicine, division of gastroenterology and hepatology, and UNC co-investigators also found that over time mindfulness training also reduced psychological distress associated with IBS. The study was led by Susan Gaylord, PhD, director of the University of North Carolina Program on Integrative Medicine.

2. Tough economic times affect colonoscopy screening rates even among the insured

This study sought to determine if the recent economic recession had an impact on the use of screening colonoscopy among people with health insurance. Dr. Spencer D. Dorn, assistant professor of medicine and co-investigators in the division of gastroenterology and hepatology at UNC found that it did. Colonoscopy rates decreased among insured Americans during the recession, with high out-of-pocket costs a major factor. The findings support policies aimed at reducing costs for the procedure.

3. Diets high in fiber won't protect against diverticulosis

People whose diets are low in fiber are thought to be at greater risk for developing the diverticular disease of the large intestine than those who eat high-fiber diets. The disease, in which pouches develop in the colon wall, affects about one-third of adults over age 60 and often occurs without symptoms. But complications can be severe and resultant U.S. health expenditures very high, an estimated $2.5 billion per year. A study of more than 2,000 people reported by Anne Peery, MD, fellow in the gastroenterology and hepatology division at UNC, could change dietary recommendations regarding the problem. Rather than a decrease, Peery and co-investigators found an increased risk of diverticulosis in people whose diets are high in fiber and who have more frequent bowel movements.


Contact: Les Lang
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Related medicine news :

1. Embedded Mobile & M2M Device revenues to Rise to Almost $19 Billion Globally by 2014, Says Juniper Research
2. 2010 HSR Impact Award recognizes surgical safety research
3. MSU launches first anti-counterfeiting research program
4. Researchers map all the fragile sites of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiaes genome
5. UH Case Medical Center researchers publish promising findings for advanced cervical cancer
6. Researchers discover new way to kill pediatric brain tumors
7. Family Research Council: Planned Parenthood Report Oversexualizes Ten-Year-Olds, Undermines Parental Authority
8. Michael J. Fox Foundation Awards $1 Million to Drive Critical New Research Tools and Technologies in Parkinsons Drug Development
9. Luth Researchs IndicatorEDG(TM) Study Finds Americans Hopes of Achieving Their Dreams Are Fading
10. International Diabetes Federation awards $2 million to 9 global diabetes research projects
11. Gladstones Robert Mahley to receive Research!America advocacy award
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/30/2015)... , ... November 30, 2015 , ... MOSI recently added ... Sea along with Back to the Jurassic to their collection of interactive exhibits within ... created dynamic worlds that will allow guests to get closer than ever to a ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... 2015 , ... The world of hair transplants and restoration is filled with ... and procedures have been in use for many years and are among the most ... M.D. has utilized many of these methods over the years, he also keeps an ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... On Saturday, October 24th, 2015, at the Mill ... fundraising event, a 5K walk known as “Making Strides Against Breast Cancer”. Patients and ... is also located in Battle Creek, joined in for this campaign that sought to ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... CA (PRWEB) , ... November 30, 2015 , ... The ... matters of personal styling. So why is it a national news story when Donald ... to Parsa Mohebi, M.D., because appearances count more than anyone wants to admit when ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... According to an article published November ... slightly unusual choice to show her Instagram followers that the praise that they were ... pre-mature. Saying that she didn’t “want to mislead any mommy's who just had babies ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2015)... , Nov. 30, 2015   Royal Philips ... the launch of Radiology Solutions, a fully integrated, ... Solutions comprises customized, data-driven practice management approaches that ... help radiology practices improve care delivery and reduce ... Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting (RSNA) ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... , Nov. 30, 2015  IBA Molecular North ... and distribution of radiopharmaceuticals, announced that as of January ... Inc. (Zevacor Pharma). The decision to rebrand the company ... firm as well as its close relationship with Zevacor ... Illinois Health and Science (IHS). Peter ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... BOCA RATON, Fla. , Nov. 30, 2015 ... Public Research (the Institute) announced today that it ... a medical device start-up company with technology developed at ... based on publicly-funded research, and bridges early funding gaps ... -based universities and research institutions. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: