Navigation Links
UNC report: Heat-related deaths in high school football players dip, but all are preventable
Date:7/30/2008

CHAPEL HILL You could say two is a small number.

But that's still two too many for Frederick O. Mueller, Ph.D., professor of exercise and sports science in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The figure represents the number of reported cases of heat stroke deaths among high school level football players in 2007. To Mueller, it also represents two young lives unnecessarily lost: one was 17-years-old; the other, just 16.

"There's no excuse for any number of heat stroke deaths, since they are all preventable with the proper precautions," said Mueller, the author of the Annual Survey of Football Injuries, a long-running compilation of statistics that tracks major injuries and deaths in 1.8 million football players on middle school, high school, college, sandlot (organized, non-school affiliated) and professional teams. The report is produced by the UNC-based National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research, of which Mueller is director.

The figures take to 33 the total number of football players who have died from heat stroke since 1995 (25 high school, 5 college, 2 professional and one sandlot).

With summer now in full swing and football training sessions kicking into gear, the latest annual report serves as a stark reminder of the precautions that coaches and players need to take when practicing and playing in the heat.

Mueller's report offers the following advice for helping prevent heat-related deaths:

  • Require each athlete to have a physical and know if an athlete has a history of heat-related illness; such players are more susceptible to heat stroke. Overweight players are also at higher risk.
  • Acclimatize players to the heat slowly; North Carolina mandates that the first three days of practice be done without uniforms.
  • Alter practice schedules to avoid long workouts in high-humidity.
  • Provide cold water before, during and after practice in unlimited quantities.
  • Provide shaded rest areas with circulating air; remove helmets and loosen or remove jerseys; some schools have plastic outdoor pools filled with ice for cool-downs after practice.
  • Athletes should weigh in each day before and after practice and their weight charts should be checked in order to treat any who lose excessive weight each day. Generally, a three percent loss in body weight through sweating is safe; five percent is in the danger zone.
  • Know the symptoms of heat illness: nausea, incoherence, fatigue, weakness, vomiting, muscle cramps, weak rapid pulse and visual disturbance. Contrary to popular belief, heat stroke victims may sweat profusely.
  • Have an emergency plan in place; parents should inquire about emergency plans for their children's teams.

Along with the two confirmed fatal cases last year, there was one other death of a high school player that might have been due to heat stroke, but no autopsy was performed. This compares to five heat stroke deaths in 2006. In the past decade, there have been only two years when no such deaths were recorded: 2002 and 2003.

In all, the 2007 football season saw 13 fatalities among the estimated 1.8 million players. Including the three high school deaths mentioned above, there were nine "indirect" fatalities (e.g. heat stroke, heart related, etc), as well as four "direct" deaths, which are defined as fatalities resulting directly from participation in the fundamental skills of football, such as tackling and blocking.

Of the indirect deaths, six were high school players, one was a college athlete, one was a sandlot player, and one semi-professional. Along with 2003, last year was the only time since 1999 that the total number of indirect fatal injuries has been in the single figures.

Among the four direct fatalities, three were in high school football and one was at the professional level in the World Indoor Football League. Two fatalities resulted from injuries to the brain, one to the spinal cord and one to internal injuries.


'/>"/>

Contact: Patric Lane
patric_lane@unc.edu
919-962-8596
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. American Heart Association Surgical Supplement Journal Report: Appropriate Hospital Discharge System Can Prevent Future Cardiac Events
2. New Report: Dangerous Drug Side Effects and Deaths Doubled Since 1998... Seniors Hit Hardest
3. New Report: Increasing Oregons Cigarette Tax Will Reduce Smoking, Save Lives and Save Money
4. New report: private/public insurance mix is most practical way to achieve universal coverage
5. New Report: Increasing Marylands Cigarette Tax Will Reduce Smoking, Save Lives and Save Money
6. Report: Medicare-Administered Drug Benefit Would be More Affordable, Comprehensive, Stable than Current Private Insurance-Run Drug Benefit
7. Landmark Report: Excess Body Fat Causes Cancer
8. New Report: Tobacco Regulation Would Save Iowa $449 Million in Health Care Costs by Preventing 25,700 Kids from Smoking
9. Report: Too Few Physicians, Nurses to Implement Presidential Candidates Health Reform Plans
10. American Heart Association Themed Issue Journal Report: Journal Edition Dedicated to Womens Unique Hypertension Issues
11. New MedPAC Report: Abbreviated Biogenerics Pathway Urgently Needed
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... ... On The Brink”: the Christian history of the United States and the loss of ... William Nowers. Captain Nowers and his wife, Millie, have six children, ten grandchildren, ... Navy. Following his career as a naval aviator and carrier pilot, he spent ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The company has developed a suite of ... authorities worldwide. From Children’s to Adults 50+, every formula has been developed by ... , These products are also: Gluten Free, Non-GMO, Vegan, Soy Free, Non-Dairy*, Preservative ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... drug delivery system that we intend to develop to enable prevention of a ... lead to severe hearing loss, especially in pediatric patients. For cisplatin, hearing loss ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... On Saturday, October 21, the Health & Wellness ... Moonlight to raise money for the American Heart Association Heart Walk. Teams of up ... work together to keep their treadmills moving for 5 hours. Treadmills will start at ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... in wound care advancements to physician colleagues, skilled nursing facility medical directors and ... the Treacherous Waters of Wound Care." , "At many of these conferences we ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... -- AVACEN Medical , Inc. (AVACEN) announced that Frost ... Product Innovation Award for Its fibromyalgia pain management device. ... device market research by Frost & Sullivan,s industry experts. ... relief product, the AVACEN 100, offers a safe and effective ... ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... Texas , Oct. 11, 2017  Caris Life ... focused on fulfilling the promise of precision medicine, today ... has joined Caris, Precision Oncology Alliance™ (POA) as its ... cancer centers, the St. Jude Crosson Cancer Institute will ... advance the use of tumor profiling, making cancer treatment ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... EXTON, Pa. , Oct. 10, 2017   ... leader in innovative solutions for injectable drug administration, today ... of West,s ID Adapter for improving the intradermal administration ... the Fourth Skin Vaccination Summit in May 2017 by ... Team Lead, Polio Department, World Health Organization (WHO), and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: