Navigation Links
UNC expert: Better decision support tools needed for prostate cancer screening choice
Date:9/28/2009

CHAPEL HILL - Although screening for prostate cancer with the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) test in men ages 50-70 can detect the cancer before it becomes symptomatic, knowing whether screening is beneficial for these men is uncertain.

Recent trials have shown small or no reductions in prostate cancer mortality among those screened. The small potential for benefit must be balanced against the more common and immediate downsides of increasing the chance of prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment-related complications.

Developing more effective decision support tools may help men and their physicians discuss whether or not to undertake PSA screening.

Michael Pignone, M.D., M.P.H., authored an editorial in the Sept. 28 Archives of Internal Medicine about this issue. He reviewed two studies: one from the National Survey of Medical Decisions and a second study from Australia that modeled the potential effects of screening for use in discussions about screening.

Pignone is associate professor of medicine and chief of the division of general internal medicine in the UNC School of Medicine and a member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

He explained, "To make a good decision about whether or not to be screened, patients need to know their chances of being helped by screening and their chances of being harmed."

"The National Survey of Medical Decisions suggests that patients are not being regularly informed about the advantages and disadvantages of screening. The downsides of screening were talked about in only 32 percent of the discussions. Half of the patients couldn't answer any of the knowledge questions correctly about screening risks.

The Australian study provides updated data for such conversations: screening increases the chance of being diagnosed with prostate cancer from 23 per 1000 to 53 per 1000 over 10 years. The number of men with treatment related impotence or incontinence would also be twice as common: about 26 per 1000 vs. 12 per 1000. The chance of death from prostate cancer would be reduced from 4 in 1000 to 3 in 1000."

"The next step is to study whether providing patients with such information and determining if it changes their knowledge and preferences about screening."


'/>"/>

Contact: Dianne Shaw
dgs@med.unc.edu
919-966-5905
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Expert: Long-term care health coverage a hidden casualty of economic slide
2. Food Safety Expert: Americans Not Aware of Ongoing Risk & Complications of Salmonella Poisoning
3. Conventional prognostic factors fail to explain better prostate cancer survival in most Asian men
4. Waist-to-hip ratio may better predict cardiovascular risk than body mass index
5. Informational handout key to giving parents a better understanding of CT radiation risks
6. Children of depressed moms do better when dad is involved, SLU researcher finds
7. Struggling male readers respond better to female teachers
8. Physician Skin Care Specialist Says Proposed New Rules for Sunscreen Products Will Better Protect the Public
9. Mothers Know Best: NFL Moms Team With Eddie George to Showcase a Better Way to a Healthier Lifestyle
10. Researchers Find Better Way to Deliver Blood Thinner
11. Clinical trials present better alternatives for dialysis patients
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
UNC expert: Better decision support tools needed for prostate cancer screening choice
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... TopConsumerReviews.com recently awarded their highest five-star rating to ... of individuals in the United States and Canada wear eyeglasses. Once considered to be ... vision and make a fashion statement. Even celebrities use glasses as a way of ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... Cary, North Carolina (PRWEB) , ... June 26, 2016 , ... ... the release of a new product that was developed to enhance the health of ... harvested for centuries. , The two main herbs in the PawPaws Cat Kidney ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Austin residents seeking Mohs surgery services, can now ... and to Dr. Russell Peckham for medical and surgical dermatology. , Dr. Dorsey brings ... The selective fellowship in Mohs Micrographic Surgery completed by Dr. Dorsey was under the ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong Southern ... Laude and his M.D from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He ... Los Angeles to complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... A recent article published June 14 ... The article goes on to state that individuals are now more comfortable seeking to ... operations such as calf and cheek reduction. The Los Angeles area medical group, Beverly ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... Revolutionary technology includes multi-speaker listening to conquer ... in advanced audiology and hearing aid technology, has today ... world,s first internet connected hearing aid that opens up ...      (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160622/382240 ) , ... , TwinLink™ - the first dual communication ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Research and Markets has announced ... Analysis (United States, China, Japan, Brazil, United Kingdom, Germany, ... offering. Surgical Procedure ... planners, provides surgical procedure volume data in a geographic ... in-depth analysis of growth drivers and inhibitors, including world ...
(Date:6/23/2016)...  The National Pharmaceutical Council (NPC) today announced ... research organization as its newest member.  ... president and chief scientific officer, Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals, will ... Board of Directors. ... us in support of our efforts to conduct ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: