Navigation Links
UMD team gives drug dropouts a second chance

A cross-disciplinary team of researchers at the University of Maryland has designed a molecular container that can hold drug molecules and increase their solubility, in one case up to nearly 3000 times. Their discovery opens the possibility of rehabilitating drug candidates that were insufficiently soluble. It also offers an opportunity to improve successful drugs that could be made even better with better solubility.

The team's innovative findings were recently published in a study in Nature Chemistry, in which the authors note that "the solubility characteristics of 40-70 percent of new drug candidates are so poor that they cannot be formulated on their own, so new methods for increasing drug solubility are highly prized."

The Maryland scientists where able to increase the solubility of ten insoluble drugs by between 23 and 2,750 times, by forming container-drug complexes. They also show that their containers have low toxicity in human cell line and mice studies, and that the molecular containers can be built from inexpensive and readily available reagents.

"We already are working with drug companies to help them solubilize their interesting drug candidates and hope to get them interested in licensing our technology," says co-leader Volker Briken, an associate professor in the department of cell biology and molecular genetics and also a scientist in the Maryland Pathogen Research Institute.

The team, led by Briken and UMD Chemistry & Biochemistry Professor Lyle Isaacs, created their "new class of general-purpose solubilizing agents" based on a type of compound called cucurbit[n]urils - or CB[n]. These are 'macrocyclic' molecules made up of units of bicyclic glycoluril C4H4N4O2 monomers. The n in CB[n] refers to the number of repeat units in the macrocycle.

Many previous attempts have been made to capture drug molecules within these and other synthetic cages and capsules to increase drugs' solubility, but with limited success.

Issacs and Briken say that next their team would like to increase the variety of novel acyclic CBs in order to be able to solubilize a maximal number of small chemical drug candidates, and also would like to generate CBs that can be specifically targeted -- for example to cancer cells.

Macrocycles have long been studied and used for a variety of applications from synthetic dyes to fabric softeners. Existing medical applications related to the new UMD work include "cyclodextrin" molecular containers currently used for the formulation of hydrophobic insoluble drugs that are on the market. Examples of biological macrocyclic molecules are Heme, the active site in hemoglobin (the protein in blood that transports oxygen) and the chlorin ring in chlorophyll (the green photosynthetic pigment found in plants).


Contact: Lee Tune
University of Maryland

Related medicine news :

1. Procedure gives patients with A-fib who cant take blood thinners alternative to reduce stroke
2. Image share project gives patients and physicians anytime, anywhere access to medical images
3. U.S. Gives Green Light to Publish Controversial Bird Flu Research
4. Research gives hope to detecting cancer in early stages
5. Electrical pulse treatment gives pancreatic cancer patients new hope
6. Chorus Gives Voice to Those With Alzheimers
7. Dentist Gives Advice to Keep Holiday Smiles Bright
8. Hospital gives first tomosynthesis mammograms in region this week
9. Rare Seizure Disorder Gives Clues About Brains Laughter Center
10. Dr. Albert Rizzo gives Estabrook Lecture on Dec. 2
11. George Mason University research gives hope to women with deadliest breast cancer
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
UMD team gives drug dropouts a second chance
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... The ... OSHA Training Institute Education Center headquartered in Northern California, has issued an important ... heat at their worksites. Employers with workers exposed to high temperatures should ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... ... "FCPX editors can now reveal their media with growing colorful split screen ... - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProSlice Color brings the split screens ... reveal the media of their split screens with growing colorful panels. , ProSlice Color ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... TherapySites, ... today its affiliation with Tennessee Counseling Association. This new relationship allows ... the Tennessee Counseling Association, adding exclusive benefits and promotional offers. , "TCA is ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... industry today announced its strategic partnership with Connance, a healthcare industry leader ... two companies’ proven, proprietary technology combine to provide health systems, hospitals and ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... cutting edge technology to revolutionize the emergency ambulance transport experience for the millions ... aware of how Uber has disrupted the taxi industry through the use of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... DUBLIN , June 23, 2016 ... "Global MEMS Devices Medical Market Analysis 2016 - Forecast to ... The report contains up to date financial ... reliable analysis. Assessment of major trends with potential impact on ... dive analysis of market segmentation which comprises of sub markets, ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 , ... Thursday, July 7, 2016 , , , , LOCATION: , ... , , , , EXPERT PANELISTS:  , , , Frost ... Industry Analyst, Christi Bird; Senior Industry Analyst, Divyaa Ravishankar and Unmesh ... The global pharmaceutical industry is witnessing an exceptional era. Several ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016  Guerbet announced today that it has been ... Award . One of 12 suppliers to ... its support of Premier members through exceptional local customer ... commitment to lower costs. ... our outstanding customer service from Premier," says Massimo ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: