Navigation Links
UIC researchers hunting drugs for devastating parasitic disease
Date:12/16/2008

Hundreds of millions of people, mainly in developing countries, are disabled by infectious diseases, according to the World Health Organization.

More than 12 million people in 88 countries are infected with leishmaniasis, a parasitic disease spread by the bite of infected sand flies. Nearly 2 million new cases are reported and about 70,000 people die from the disease annually.

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered that compounds derived from a natural product can be used in developing a new drug to treat the disease.

Despite a worsening global impact of this disease, little progress has been made toward the development of new chemotherapeutics against it, says Alan Kozikowski, professor and director of UIC's Drug Discovery Program and coordinator of the project.

Drugs compounded from the toxic metal antimony have been the first-line therapeutic option for more than 50 years.

"But antimonials may cause acute pancreatitis and cardiac arrhythmia and can sometimes lead to death," Kozikowski said. Only recently, he said, have novel agents been added to the therapeutic arsenal.

Leishmaniasis can be cutaneus, which causes skin sores that leave ugly scars, or visceral, which is 100 percent fatal if left untreated.

Visceral leishmaniasis has increased in recent years due to emerging co-infections with HIV, spreading the disease to the developed countries in North America and southern Europe, Kozikowski said. The disease is normally found in tropical regions, from the rain forests in Central and South America to deserts in West Asia.

To find a starting point from which to develop a better drug, UIC postdoctoral researchers Suresh Tipparaju and Marco Pieroni synthesized a chemical "library" of more than 100 diverse compounds and screened them for biological activity against the Leishmania parasite. They observed high antiparasitic activity in a compound first isolated from streptomyces bacteria more than 20 years ago. That compound, Tipparaju said, could potentially be modified to treat leishmaniasis. It was already three times more active than miltefosine, a drug in current use, he said.

Miltefosine is the first oral drug to cure both visceral and cutaneus leishmaniasis. Despite the drug's efficacy, Tipparaju said, miltefosine is limited by its persistence in the bloodstream and long-term side effects. It is also not effective when given to patients co-infected with HIV.

The UIC researchers are attempting to develop an antiparasitic agent that is less toxic than miltefosine and that can kill the parasite inside blood cells. In addition, the researchers are investigating the mechanism of action of the new candidate compounds through a collaboration with Manlio Tolomeo of the Center for Parasitic Diseases in Palermo, Italy. Mechanistic studies could lead to further improvement of promising agents, Tipparaju said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sam Hostettler
samhos@uic.edu
312-355-2522
University of Illinois at Chicago
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Stanford researchers find culprit in aging muscles that heal poorly
2. UCLA researchers identify markers that may predict diabetes in still-healthy people
3. Mayo Clinic researchers discover new diagnostic test for detecting infection in prosthetic joints
4. Bipolar disorder relapses halved by Melbourne researchers
5. Cell that triggers symptoms in allergy attacks can also limit damage, Stanford researchers find
6. High and mighty: first common height gene identified by researchers behind obesity gene finding
7. Researchers estimate about 9 percent of US children age 8 to 15 meet criteria for having ADHD
8. Majority of 2.4 Million U.S. Children With ADHD Not Diagnosed or Consistently Treated, According to New Gold Standard Study by Cincinnati Childrens Researchers
9. Researchers develop long-lasting growth hormone
10. Jefferson immunology researchers halt lethal rabies infection in brain
11. Purdue researchers develop technology to detect cancer by scanning surface veins
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/9/2016)... ... December 09, 2016 , ... The Holy Name Medical Center ... NY, on December 3rd, to benefit Holy Name Medical Center's programs and services. ... raised over $1 million - the largest event in the Center's history, both ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... ... December 09, 2016 , ... "I had a terrible time trying ... Va. "I thought that if the nebulizer had a more child-friendly design, then children ... , He developed the patent-pending NEBY to avoid the need to deliver medication via ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... will become Quality Insights beginning January 1, 2017. The name change aligns ... commitment to measuring and improving health care quality. , “We are very proud ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... , ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... Research Institute (WCRI) officially opened registration today for its 33rd Annual Issues ... Boston, MA . , The theme of the conference is “Persistent Challenges and ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... ZyDoc ... Language Processing–Enabled and Conventional Data Capture Methods for Input to Electronic Health Records: ... , Results of the comparative usability study demonstrate that a dictation-based method (“NLP ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... IRIDEX Corporation (NASDAQ: IRIX ) today ... common stock, $0.01 par value (the "Offering" with such shares ... final terms of the Offering will depend on market and ... be no assurance as to whether or when the Offering ... net proceeds it will receive from this offering for working ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Dec. 8, 2016 KEY FINDINGS ... Patient warming ... of blood during surgeries, lowering the risks of neurological disorders ... of SSIs. The patient warming systems can be segmented into ... benefits in turn reduce the stay at hospitals thus, lowering ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... , Dec. 8, 2016 KEY FINDINGS ... poised to grow in 2017-2023. Various reasons for growth ... obese population, higher incidences of chronic diseases, high recovery ... mobility aid services. Medical lifting sling refers to ... with limited mobility. These slings connect to the lift ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: