Navigation Links
UH Case Medical Center publishes study on novel treatment for skin lymphoma
Date:1/17/2012

CLEVELAND: Promising findings on a novel combination treatment approach for a chronic type of skin lymphoma are being published today (embargoed for 4 pm) in JAMA's Archives of Dermatology by clinical researchers from Seidman Cancer Center at University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

The article outlines findings from a first-of-its-kind study showing that O6-benzylguanine is successful in treating cutaneous T-Cell lymphoma by enhancing the efficacy of topical chemotherapy (carmustine).

"Current therapy for cutaneous T-Cell lymphoma is suboptimal and this new study shows that adding O6-benzylguanine to carmustine is more effective and less toxic to the skin, allowing for more optimal treatments," says Kevin Cooper, MD, Chairman of the Department of Dermatology at UH Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "This treatment essentially weakens the cancer cells to make the lymphoma more vulnerable to topical chemotherapy and has a lot of potential in alleviating patients' disease burden in this chronic and progressive disease."

Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is a form of lymphoma which affects the skin and typically relapses and becomes increasingly challenging to treat. The new drug combination offers a potential new option for patients using skin-directed treatments, before the need to undergo systemic chemotherapy.

Clinical researchers at UH Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University have been investigating O6-benzylguanine over the past decade and were participants in the original research into its mechanism of action as a cancer treatment potentiator. This study, funded by National Cancer Institute grants to Case Western Reserve University in conjunction with Keryx Pharmaceuticals Inc., is the first to explore the drug's efficacy to intensify treatment for skin lymphoma.

When used alone, carmustine attaches to the DNA in the patient's cancer cells during the replication process, causing the cancer cells to die. Problems sometimes occur when an enzyme clips off the treatment from the DNA, allowing the cancer cells to replicate. O6-benzylguanine inhibits the enzyme from clipping off the carmustine from the DNA, so the drug can complete its mission and kill the cancer cells.

"By adding O6-benzylguanine, we can effectively lower the dosage of the topical treatment, carmustine, and render it less toxic on healthy cells but more effective at killing cancer cells," says Dr. Cooper. "This combination treatment has had excellent initial clinical results and we are following it up with additional ongoing studies."


'/>"/>
Contact: Alicia Reale
alicia.reale@uhhospitals.org
University Hospitals Case Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Surgical robots to provide open-source platform for medical robotics research
2. CCNYs Robert Alfano wins first biomedical optics award
3. CareFirst BCBS and ACP offer new tool to advance development of patient-centered medical homes
4. Use of acupuncture in the US military highlighted in special issue of Medical Acupuncture
5. Lingua franca critical for electronic medical records and health information exchange
6. Self-affirmation may break down resistance to medical screening
7. Society of Interventional Radiology Foundation receives support from Siemens Medical
8. FDA Seeks to Get More Women Into Trials of Medical Devices
9. Experts Urge Limits on Medical Research on Chimpanzees
10. UW Medical Center granted magnet status for excellence in nursing care
11. Nations largest federation of biological and biomedical organizations welcomes 2 new members
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... Be Well Medical Group ... heart of Old Town at 108 South Columbus St, Suite 201, Alexandria, VA. Be ... of medical care in the convenience of their homes, offices or at the practices’ ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , ... February 11, 2016 , ... ... dynamometers and ergoFET force gauges used in physical therapy, occupational therapy and sports ... sensor for resistance cord exercise and therapy, introduces its new microFET Digital Pinch ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 11, 2016 , ... ... have become more actively engaged in health and wellness best practices in the ... of riding this trend. February is American Heart Month, which acts as an ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... Research led ... rates of several common cancer screenings, especially among women. Cancer screenings are often ... rates. , The study,“What Does Medicaid Expansion Mean for Cancer Screening and ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... President Obama’s budget proposal ... to deliver medical services via telehealth, estimated to generate more than $160 million ... language for many years. Although there is more to be done, this ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... WILMINGTON, N.C. , Feb. 11, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... a leading provider of custom manufacturing and development ... announces expanded sterile fill-finish capabilities and capacity in ... Substantial growth in demand has driven several recent ... in 2001 it had one filling line with ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , 11 de fevereiro de 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... de sua fábrica de soroalbumina bovina (BSA -- ... A fábrica fica na Ilha Norte da Nova ... desenvolvido e estabelecido na fábrica da Proliant nos ... . O projeto e instalação dos equipamentos foram ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... February 11, 2016 Breast Cancer Therapeutics ... Asia-Pacific (APAC) breast cancer market will ... billion by 2021, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) ... Markets to 2021 - states that the ... expansion from $1.9 billion in 2014 to $3.4 billion by ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: