Navigation Links
UCSD researchers receive $2.5 million in new stem cell grants
Date:6/23/2010

A pair of University of California San Diego researchers Martin Marsala, a specialist in spinal cord trauma and disorders, and Yang Xu, an immunologist have been awarded more than $2.5 million in new grants from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM).

The grants are two of 19 Stem Cell Transplantation Immunology awards totaling $25 million that were approved at the June 23 meeting of CIRM's Independent Citizens' Oversight Committee to fund work that translates basic research into clinical cures.

Marsala, MD, professor of anesthesiology in the UC San Diego School of Medicine, was awarded a grant worth more than $1.3 million to develop methods that would promote and prolong the survival of therapeutic stem cells grafted into the central nervous system, using few or no immunosuppressive drugs.

"Immunosuppressive drugs have many negative side effects," said Marsala. "If we can improve immune tolerance to specific cell lines, we may be able to develop therapies that are well-tolerated; which would have a significant impact for patients."

There are multiple prongs to Marsala's project. Researchers will test engraftment of three different neuronal precursor cell lines of human origin using an animal model. They will study the comparative survival of cells grafted into healthy and into injured spinal cord tissue. And they will test the engraftment success of genetically reprogrammed neuronal cells generated from pig skin cells.

Xu, PhD, a professor of biology at UC San Diego, and colleagues received a $1.2 million CIRM grant to exploring improving the human immune system's tolerance to grafted tissues derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).

Xu's project involves developing an appropriate animal model for testing the idea of inducing tolerance by transplanting hESC-derived hematopoietic stem cells (multipotent stem cells that give rise to all blood cell types) into recipients prior to grafting other tissues derived from hESCs.

"Right now, rejection of grafted tissues expressing antigens from the donor can be delayed for a time if the immune system is persistently suppressed," said Xu. "But eventually, most grafts are rejected. And persistent immune suppression increases the risk for cancer and infection.

"By learning how to effectively generate and graft hESC-derived hematopoietic stem cells before other tissues are grafted, we hope to induce immune tolerance that would allow other transplanted hESC-derived cells to survive long-term and accomplish their missions."


'/>"/>

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Researchers find key to getting estrogens benefits without cancer risk
2. Mount Sinai researchers find structural basis for incidence of skin cancers in a genetic disorder
3. WSU researchers find mothers of children with autism pay price in workplace
4. Free Resources from EBSCO Publishing Providing Useful Information to Researchers
5. University of Utah researchers fight genetic killer of infants and toddlers
6. Researchers identify key enzyme in melanoma cell development
7. Researchers predict human visual attention using computer intelligence for the first time
8. Montreal researchers shed light on common juvenile cancer
9. Early detection of cancer: The FDA approves procedure discovered by EPFL researchers
10. Researchers report new autism genes discovered
11. Simple eye test measures damage from multiple sclerosis, UT Southwestern researchers find
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... professionals, announced today its affiliation with Tennessee Counseling Association. This new ... network of the Tennessee Counseling Association, adding exclusive benefits and promotional offers. , ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... Quality metrics are proliferating in ... ways they remain in the eye of the beholder, according to experts who offered ... The American Journal of Managed Care. For the full issue, click here . ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... Brent Kasmer, a legally blind and certified personal trainer ... through a fitness app. The fitness app plans to fix the two major problems leading ... a one size fits all type program , They don’t eliminate all the ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 25, 2016 , ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 due to ... a new, often overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ability to live away from ... common occurrence, but a necessary one in the event that lice have simply gotten out ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... recover from injury. Recently, he has implemented orthobiologic procedures as a method for ... is one of the first doctors to perform the treatment. Orthobiologics are substances ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... CLEMENTE, Calif. , June 24, 2016  American Respiratory Labs ... company, is now able to perform sophisticated lung assessments in patients, ... Technologies , Inc. Patients are no longer limited ... ndd,s EasyOne PRO ® , ARL patients like Jeanne R. of ... done in the comfort of her own home. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... LEXINGTON, Mass. , June 24, 2016   ... specialty pharmaceutical company developing innovative inhaled drugs, announced today ... when Russell Investments reconstituted its comprehensive set ... 2016. "This is an important milestone for ... "It will increase shareholder awareness of our progress in ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- MedSource announced today that it has selected Datatrial,s ... choice.  This latest decision demonstrates MedSource,s commitment to ... by offering a state-of-the-art electronic data capture (EDC) ... the EDC platform of choice in exchange for ... long been a preferred EDC platform by our ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: